Still trying to decide if Windows 10 is the right fit?

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If you're still stumped about whether or not to upgrade to Windows 10 for your organization, Scott Matteson offers a flowchart to help you pinpoint whether it's beneficial.

It's been a few months since it's release, but for those still trying to decide whether Windows 10 is right for their organization, here's a flowchart to help you out.

Microsoft's last release was Windows 8.1, and they elected to skip the use of the name Windows 9 for reasons which remain vague, but could have to do with the sluggish adoption of Windows 8. Windows 8 featured the removal of the Start Menu, which was not deemed popular (although free software such as Classic Shell can bring it back)

Microsoft seeks to change that with a fresh start and new features such as:

  • The return of the Start Menu
  • The Windows 7 style desktop (the separate Metro display and Desktop are now gone)
  • Better arrangement of windows using Snap Assist
  • Virtual Desktops
  • Faster start times
  • Integration across multiple Windows devices
  • Touchscreen detection
  • Cortana search/virtual assistant
  • An Xbox app
  • Access to the Windows store

Best of all, Windows 10 is a free upgrade for existing Windows systems (for one year, after which it will cost $119). As with Windows 7, there are Home and Pro versions available, and the free offerings will correspond to currently-installed OS versions

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Trying to decide when and how to upgrade is never an easy task. As Ed Bott points out in his article "How long should you wait before deploying Windows 10?" on Tech Pro Research, the old habit of waiting to deploy after for the first operating service pack to be released is now defunct; Microsoft will only release patches and hotfixes from here on out.

We've put together a guide to help determine whether you should upgrade to Windows 10 (and if so perhaps what your timeframe should be). This series of questions and the associated points scored by each answer, which are tallied up at the end, will give you a good notion of how Windows 10 might (or might not) benefit you organization. Note that questions related to organizations can also apply to single consumers.

1. Do your computers meet the following requirements:

  • Processor: 1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster
  • RAM: 1 gigabyte (GB) (32-bit) or 2 GB (64-bit)
  • Free hard disk space: 16 GB
  • Graphics card: Microsoft DirectX 9 graphics device with WDDM driver
  • A Microsoft account and Internet access

Yes (6 points)

No (0 points)

2. Do you have a consistent environment (most users running same HW/OS)?

Yes (5 points)

No (0 points)

3. Are you able to test Windows 10 now?

Yes (7 points)

No (0 points)

4. Are you now on XP and planning an upgrade to a newer version of Windows?

Yes (7 points)

No (0 points)

5. Are you already in a Windows 7/8/8.1 deployment?

Yes (0 points)

No (6 points)

6. Are you unhappy with your existing OS environment/speed/capabilities?

Yes (7 points)

No (0 points)

7. If on Windows 8, do you find there are difficulties with the charms bar/navigation?

Yes (7 points)

No (0 points)

8. Are you buying a large amount of new systems in the next 12 months?

Yes (7 points)

No (0 points)

9. Do you see benefits from the Windows store and apps available?

Yes (6 points)

No (0 points)

10. Do you have an interest in and need for the comprehensive search/assistant tool offered by Cortana?

Yes (7 points)

No (0 points)

11. Do you use or need multiple desktops?

Yes (7 points)

No (0 points)

12. Do you use Windows on tablets/smartphones (e.g. touchscreens)?

Yes (7 points)

No (0 points)

13. Would you benefit from being able to open Metro style apps in windows rather than full screen?

Yes (7 points)

No (0 points)

14. Do you perform command prompt work that would be benefited by the use of Ctrl C/Ctrl V to copy and paste?

Yes (7 points)

No (0 points)

15. Do you use OneDrive/OneDrive for Business?

Yes (7 points)

No (0 points)

SCORING

0-25

There seems to be little if any need for you to conduct a Windows 10 upgrade.

26-50

There may be some minor benefit to a Windows 10 upgrade, but this can probably be performed as old systems age out and are replaced via the natural business process.

51-75

Windows 10 would bring some advantages which may help improve your computing capabilities, and a pilot program should be planned out to establish an implementation schedule. Make sure to include training for your users to educate them on what to expect and how to take advantage of the benefits of the new OS.

76-100

Windows 10 would bring some very strong, clear benefits to your company and you should begin testing and scheduling a phased rollout as soon as possible. Make sure to include training for your users to educate them on what to expect and how to take advantage of the benefits of the new OS.

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