CXO

The 5 most important skills a CTO can have on their LinkedIn profile

CTOs can increase their chances of landing speaking gigs and finding new positions by listing the right skills on their online resume.

Chief technology officers (CTOs) play a role in their organization's digital transformation efforts and make daily decisions around how to communicate with the business, what tech tools to use, and who to delegate tasks to.

LinkedIn is a key way for CTOs to find new jobs and opportunities in their field, as well as for others to find them for speaking events and interviews.

"LinkedIn can be a powerful tool, but not everyone takes full advantage and uses it to tell a story of who they are and what they've achieved," said Kitty Brandtner, manager of major accounts specializing in technology at staffing agency LaSalle Network.

Here are five things that CTOs should make sure they include in their LinkedIn profiles to best showcase their skills.

1. Tech skills

While CTOs aren't expected to act as heads-down coders, companies do want them to have a strong technical background demonstrated on their resume.

Agile, JavaScript, and machine learning are the top three skills employers look for for the CTO job title, according to data from Indeed. Other top skills include Amazon Web Services, Java, .NET, big data, project management, and artificial intelligence.

SEE: IT jobs 2018: Hiring priorities, growth areas, and strategies to fill open roles (Tech Pro Research)

2. Media interviews and speaking engagements

To showcase thought leadership, CTOs should share media interviews or speaking engagements on their LinkedIn profile, Brandtner said.

"It's best if these are on the topics of scaling, solving problems, disruption, innovation, building and leading teams," Brandtner said.

Those seeking speakers for industry conferences and events look to LinkedIn to find them, so having an updated profile with all press or thought leadership is important for building your own brand that way, Brandtner said.

3. Problem solving skills

If CTOs don't have thought leadership through press or speaking examples, for each role listed, you can explain how you've scaled, solved a problem, or helped the company innovate in each position's summary, Brandtner said.

4. Projects you've completed

Companies want to see the work you've done, as well as how accountable you are for successes and failures, according to Shalom Berkowitz, senior recruiting team lead at ‎IT staffing agency Mondo.

CTOs should add examples of the projects they've worked on as well as the tech stack they used, Berkowitz said. "Do research on the company you are interested in and their product, and make sure your skillset and business strategy align with what they are trying to do," he recommended.

5. Associations, groups, and philanthropy

If you're involved in any philanthropic initiatives or on the board of any associations or groups, you should include that on your profile to give a fuller view of your interests and accomplishments, Brandtner said.

Also see

istock-660751662.jpg
Image: iStockphoto/julief514

About Alison DeNisco Rayome

Alison DeNisco Rayome is a Senior Editor for TechRepublic. She covers CXO, cybersecurity, and the convergence of tech and the workplace.

Editor's Picks

Free Newsletters, In your Inbox