This Raspberry Pi-inspired Z-Berry board will take you back to the dawn of home computing

The ​Z-Berry is a single-board computer that is the same size as the Raspberry Pi and is built around the Zilog Z80 processor used in the ZX Spectrum, a best-selling British computer launched in 1982.

Video: Make your own Raspberry Pi-inspired board with the Z-Berry A tech enthusiast has built a board that apes the Raspberry Pi using a processor dating from the 1970s.

The multi-million selling Raspberry Pi was created to rekindle the curiosity about computers that the BBC Micro inspired in the 1980s.

Now the cycle has come full circle, with a hardware enthusiast creating a tiny board using components dating from the BBC's heyday, more than 30 years ago.

The Z-Berry is a single-board computer that is the same size as the Raspberry Pi and is built around the Zilog Z80 processor used in the ZX Spectrum, a best-selling British computer launched in 1982.

The 10MHz processor in the Z-Berry is orders of magnitude slower than the quad-core 1.2GHz ARM-based Broadcom processor in the latest Pi, but speed is not the point of this homebrew machine.

True to the high-end computers of the era, the Z-Berry has 512KB RAM, as well as 32KB of Read Only Memory (ROM) to store the board's firmware.

SEE: An $89 Raspberry Pi rival that runs full Windows 10 and Android

While the uses for the board are obviously more limited than the Pi, the Z-Berry has been demoed playing a numbers-themed Tetris clone called Numeris, on its attached 0.9-inch, monochrome I2C OLED display. Others hardware enthusiasts are debating whether CP/M, an operating system last updated in 1983 could be ported to the retro board.

Being the same size as the Pi, the Z-Berry fits inside Raspberry Pi cases and also includes a 40-pin GPIO header for attaching custom hardware to the board.

The homemade machine uses an SD card for storage and Micro-USB for power, a PS/2 keyboard connector, as well an I2C and an SPI bus.

If you fancy your hand at creating a Z-Berry, the board's creator has posted many details, including a schematic of the board and a list of components needed.

Read more about the Raspberry Pi