Mobility

This week's news regex: Open[A-Za-z]+

If there were announcements to be made this week, many of the usual suspects chose Oracle's OpenWorld conference in San Francisco as the place to make them.

If there were announcements to be made this week, many of the usual suspects chose Oracle's OpenWorld conference in San Francisco as the place to make them.

No points for guessing that Oracle hogged the stage at OpenWorld — with Larry Ellison reminiscing over the company's history and its first sale, which was to the CIA.

On the news front, Oracle President Charles Phillips made the announcement that there would be more announcements around virtualisation and Oracle's application stack in the future. Oh, how we do love the predictive preparatory proclamation.

Also at OpenWorld was Sun CEO Jonathan Schwartz and Dell CEO Michael Dell, who shared the stage to announce that Dell will begin shipping and supporting Solaris 10. Schwartz claimed that a third of Solaris' 12 million licensees are already on Dell hardware and it made no sense to recommend Sun hardware to people already using Dell.

Thinking about entering the world of rich media? If you are and have a spare 15 minutes then you should strap yourself into your chair and have a beverage handy as David Berlind goes through a demonstration of OpenLaszlo, an RIA framework that allows targeting to Flash and/or Ajax simultaneously.

The roundup would not be complete this week without the plethora of Android-related material that featured on the site. For the Reader's Digest condensed version, Brendon Chase put together the "Newbie guide to Google's Android". More in-depth coverage is also available with Google making the partners in the Open Handset Alliance sign a "non-fragmentation" pact. This is an interesting agreement since Google has further fragmented the mobile Java situation with its decision to develop a virtual machine outside of the Java Community Process.

What is good for the goose may well be good for the gander though. As Android is licensed under the Apache Licence, anyone is able to take the code and fork it — provided that said person/company has not signed the non-fragmentation pact. So any improvements made in Android should find their way into Java eventually; it is one of the benefits of an open source platform and an open source language.

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