Virtualization

VMware shows how not to do it

As a developer there will be a time when you ship a bug -- be it a stub that you left in, or a flaming, crashtastic segfault. The next time this happens and your bosses come baying for blood, point them in the direction of VMware, who this week gave the developer world a great example of how to ship a showstopper bug.

As a developer there will be a time when you ship a bug — be it a stub that you left in, or a flaming, crashtastic segfault. The next time this happens and your bosses come baying for blood, point them in the direction of VMware, who this week gave the developer world a great example of how to ship a showstopper bug.

Due to some code dealing with licensing making it from the beta builds into the final version, users of VMware's latest hypervisor found that their virtual machines refused to power on after being turned off. VMware rushed out a patch to rectify the issue.

Bill Gates may have signed off from daily Microsoft duties recently, but he appeared in Hong Kong to say that privacy issues pose an "interesting software challenge". If only Mr Gates was in a position to affect change in this area, something could happen to prevent it ... hang on a minute!

I hope you are seated for this one: a US counterintelligence executive said that Chinese officials could externally turn on a mobile phone and listen in on the phone's microphone. By a clear light-year, this piece of cockeyedness took out the "crackpot of the week" on Club Builder.

Just in case you forgot about it, the Semantic Web evangelists returned this week proclaiming that in the next 12 to 18 months there will be a significant increase in real world application. And they mean it this time, no really, they do! Honest!

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