Software

Watch out for this new bug in Windows 10's major update

In the wake of these latest problems, Microsoft has blocked the update from rolling out to PCs with an unsupported Intel display driver it has identified as being at the root of the issue.

Microsoft's woes with the Windows 10 October 2018 Update continue, as it emerged the update could stop audio working on some monitors.

In the wake of these latest problems, Microsoft has blocked the update from rolling out to PCs with an unsupported Intel display driver it has identified as being at the root of the issue.

The bug is the most recent in a series to have been discovered in the update since its rollout resumed last month, after being halted for more than a month to fix an earlier tranche of flaws, including a file-wiping bug.

In advice on its support page, Microsoft advises the problem emerged after "Intel inadvertently released versions of its display driver", versions 24.20.100.6344 and 24.20.100.6345, to computer manufacturers "that accidentally turned on unsupported features in Windows".

SEE: Windows 10 power tips: Secret shortcuts to your favorite settings (Tech Pro Research)

The resulting audio issues can affect monitors and TVs connected to a PC via HDMI, USB-C, or DisplayPort.

Microsoft has issued the following guidance on checking to see if your PC is affected, and advises those affected to contact Microsoft support for a resolution. Microsoft says it is working with Intel and computer manufacturers to get these display drivers replaced.

This latest Intel driver audio bug is different, according to Microsoft, to an earlier issue that occurred after installing the Intel Smart Sound Technology driver and which affected both the 1803 and 1809 versions of Windows 10.

Since the rollout of the October update, also known as version 1809, resumed on November 13th, Microsoft has also warned of ongoing issues with network drive links being unavailable after installing the update.

The initial rollout of the October update, which adds a variety of new features to Windows 10, was suspended on October 6th, in order to fix various bugs, including incorrect information being displayed about CPU utilization, an issue handling .ZIP folders, and driver clashes on HP PCs.

Following the issues with the October Update, Microsoft has faced fresh calls to slow the pace at which feature updates are applied to Windows 10 and to take time to ensure new releases are stable. In the wake of these problems, Microsoft introduced a way for those testing early builds of the OS under the Windows Insider Program to flag the severity of bugs and said it would improve communications about Windows testing and updates.

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About Nick Heath

Nick Heath is chief reporter for TechRepublic. He writes about the technology that IT decision makers need to know about, and the latest happenings in the European tech scene.

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