Enterprise Software

Web continues to stagnate

If you are in the Internet Explorer development team, you are faced with a conundrum -- the choice is either break the Web or give standards compatibility a lower priority.

If you are in the Internet Explorer development team, you are faced with a conundrum.

You have a browser that has been mercilessly hounded for lagging behind in standards compatibility in the past — yet you know that if you improve the engine to a comparable point with Safari or Mozilla, then a plethora of sites serving content based on IE's past irregularities will fail.

The choice is either break the Web or give standards compatibility a lower priority. The juiciest part in this is that you're damned if you do, and damned if you don't.

This week the IE team revealed that they had chosen to make IE8's true standards mode an optional extra. When IE8 arrives, a meta tag will need to be inserted into the page to instruct IE8 to render it in full standards mode.

The downside of this is that the bad HTML constructed in 1998 will still render properly in IE8 and will continue to for the foreseeable future. Broken HTML is still rewarded as equally as well-formed HTML in the IE world.

Opera CTO, Hakon Wium Lie, penned a piece discussing how the impact of this decision will mean that IE8 will fail the Acid2 test as it will now need a special mode invoked to render it.

Staying with the Web theme, Yahoo announced that they will be using OpenID and Lana Kovacevic chimed in with an article showing how to start taking advantage of Protype.js.

We also had an in-depth interview with Brendan Eich the CTO of Mozilla and this week's Club Builder focused on the new European antitrust probes and an interview with Jim Gettys from One Laptop Per Child.

Have a great long weekend, and we'll see you next week as we cover linux.conf.au.

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