Why software is becoming more hyper personalized

At SAP SAPPHIRE NOW 2019, Max Wessel sits down with TechRepublic to discuss why customers expect such a personalized experience from their software.

Why software is becoming more hyper personalized At SAP SAPPHIRE NOW 2019, Max Wessel sits down with TechRepublic to discuss why customers expect such a personalized experience from their software.

At SAP SAPPHIRE NOW 2019, TechRepublic Associate Staff Writer Macy Bayern sits down with SAP CIO Max Wessel to discuss why customers expect such a personalized experience from their software. The following is an edited transcript of the interview.

Macy Bayern: Why is it necessary for software to be hyper personalized, and what are some examples of ways that it is hyper personalized?

Max Wessel: The real reason we need software to be hyper personalized is because users expect it. All of us are used to carrying around a smartphone in our pockets and having apps that launch on demand that have full context of where we are and how we want to engage. They have our latitude, our longitude, our contact history. They integrate seamlessly with other applications on the device. And so we've become accustomed to this standard of usability, and it would be completely unfair for us in the enterprise world to force our users to engage with anything that delivers an experience that is anything but that level of personalized.

So it's critical that we build systems that adapt to the needs of our end users that understand their context and can often anticipate what they want to do, even before it starts. And I could give you some tangible examples.

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One of the products that we're building right now is called Room. It's a very kind of stealthy product developed by SAP. It's got about 25,000 users at 2,000 companies, and the entire thesis behind Room is you have these big back office systems, and in all of these systems, there are anomalies, there are issues that come up and we've always forced our users to then go figure out how to handle an issue somewhere else, come back into the system, and log a change.

And what we wanted to do is provide that front end that automatically brings any sort of alert into a collaborative environment, that brings the right people into that space such that they can engage, participate, collaborate and then direct action right from a screen that is as usable as Google Docs or PowerPoint. So we're really trying to bring that consumer grade experience with prediction and usability directly into that enterprise workflow.

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By Macy Bayern

Macy Bayern is an Associate Staff Writer for TechRepublic. A recent graduate from the University of Texas at Austin's Liberal Arts Honors Program, Macy covers tech news and trends.