Security

Why we need to stop using personally identifiable information as a form of access

Last year over 2.2 billion personal records were hacked. In 2018 expect data firms to move away from using identifiers like social security numbers, says IBM Security's Caleb Barlow.

There are around seven billion people on the planet and in 2017 alone, over two billion personal records were hacked. This is a big problem, according to IBM Security's Caleb Barlow.

TechRepublic's Dan Patterson met with Barlow to discuss why data firms will have to begin to use new forms of access in 2018.

Most of that data that was breached last year was immutable data, meaning information that a person can't change such as their social security number, date of birth, or their mother's maiden name.

SEE: Information security incident reporting policy (Tech Pro Research)

"We have to stop using things that can't change as forms of access," Barlow said. "Unfortunately we've all been doing that for the last decade, and now that most of this information is out there 2018 will be the year that we really have to change our tune."

Going forward, not only do we have to look at new ways of securing transactions in process by using technology such as blockchain, he said, but we also have to look at new forms of access in general such as two-factor authentication and biometrics.


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About Leah Brown

Leah Brown is the Associate Social Media Editor for TechRepublic. She manages and develops social strategies for TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research.

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