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2 very important sets of career / certification questions!!!

By davioh2001 ·
Question set #1 certifications:
I'm wondering what would be THE BEST training resource for those that have very limited budgets(around $100+I am wanting electronic resources only like practice tests)...PLEASE CHIME IN & let me know if you've had experience with the following...

A.www.cramsession.com how good are the training resources?
can anyone find the link to the $99 unlimited access promotion?

B.www.getcertify4less.com how good are the training resources?

C.www.itexamworld.com how good are the training resources?

D. other???? are there other better resources out there?

Question set #2 entry level career strategy:

Ok this is the question: I have seen MANY ads that want a diverse set of skills (must know microsoft, novell, and linux. Must know java, c++, assembly, c#) etc.

My question is do you think its better to specialize in one product certifcation or many and why?

I ask because as I move forward with my training I need to make a decision become the jack of all trades/master of none or focus on just one or 2 things. As an example I have decided to focus on learning JUST JAVA for my programming language! Is this approach foolish due to being to narrow?

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Another agreement

by Hubert1497 In reply to ridiculous

When the only tool in your toolbox is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

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Congratulations. I'm lost for

by Tony Hopkinson In reply to Get a Specialist ? not th ...

words, those who know me would congratulate you on the achievement. I can't think of anyway of responding without insulting you as much as you have me.

Thought of some now, but they may be too complex for you, depends on your background, so

Exactly which planet are you from ?

Programmer picks the environment he works in ?
Oh yeah, Boss this would work real well on a cray.

Legacy code equals over blown complexity and unreadability. ?
Bad code has been around for as long as bad programmers. I've have and still see terrible examples. The absolute worst yet that I've seen was written two years ago, a three tier client/ server relational database client. So much for legacy.

You can't maintain it therefore it is unmaintainable ? That isn't a system problem it's a HR one. Be glad you got the opportunity to learn it and gain real experience.

Knowing more than one language, method, environment means you haven't mastered it ?

Well **** yes my job isn't to teach the damn thing, it's to use what I can, to do what is required, when it is required, with what is available. The skills are analyse, design and code, not list out the semantic modifiers of language X for statement Y. All you have to do for that is select Help.

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Programmer or Software Engineer?

by jashburn In reply to Just Java...

Firstly, "Learn as many programming languages as you can" is not desirable. Sounds like "Jack of all trades, master of none". I echo apotheon on this - master a language, then learn another.

Secondly, it seems you're referring a "programmer" to a "coder", rather than a "software engineer" (or developer, some would opine). In an effective team, there's a need for both coders and engineers. Software development is an engineering process. It's not just writing software (unless your team is contracted to just write software). What use is a codebase written in the most intricate of ways, employing all the trick in the book, but is utterly unmaintainable by others within the team?

The whole engineering process, simplistically, involves analysis, design, implementation and test. In my book, I'd rather go for the well-rounded engineer who has effective working knowledge of the whole process, than the "well-rounded" programmer/coder. It's far easier (and cheaper!) to fix bad code on good design, than fix good code on bad design (design here implies architecture).

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Coders

by Tony Hopkinson In reply to Programmer or Software En ...

Personally I think some of the old jargon is being re-used and confused.
In the old days
Coder/Programmer was someone who given a detailed design could implement it.

Designer/Engineer was someone who could take a set of requirements and translate it into a detailed design.

Analyst was someone who could collate a customer's desires into a formalized set of requirements.

Analysts still exist, though they usually do Quality Assurance, or Project Management and probably Customer Account/Relationship Management as well.

I've never met a coder unless you count junior developers.

I do all three, buts that's about as rare in IT as being a bloke.

'Nuff said, 50/50 split soft and hard skills.

Have you seen ITTeacher's thread. What should I teach or something like that. Barely a mention of a hard skill like Java or any other language.

That doesn't mean you shouldn't learn at least one though. It's just an indicator of where the emphasis is in the market.

PS
You will struggle to get to 1st base, without a knowledge of SQL and at least a good overview of networking and the web, no matter what language you choose. This in the business environment, gaming is a different platform altogther.

C# and anything with .net on the end are goers at the moment, but java is still good too.

P.P.S
When searching jobserve et al and seeing the skill lists recruiters put down, take it with a pinch of salt, most don't know what any of them are anyway.
Java is an OO language. They ask for Java and OO, just in case they get someone who knows Java but not OO. The other way round is of course possible.

I've no Java experience, but I often get hits for jobs because I do know javascript, they think it's the same thing because the first four letters are the same.

Aside from extremely specific tasks such as DBA, network engineer, specialists are now very rare. One or three strings to your bow are a good idea, the experience of a career, will let you upgrade to a machine gun.

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get a life, joe

by bschaettle In reply to Just Java...

Face it, Joe - programming is just another job. Knowing multiple languages is simply the price of staying in the game. That still won't keep you from being outsourced next week, though.

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Not entirely

by alex.v In reply to Just Java...

Actually, as an Oracle (senior level) developer *** DBA, I think the idea of administering a test in a programming language that is not listed on the candidate's resume is interesting, in that it will separate thinkers from 'just coders', however it aims at a higher level employee (it won't test the specifics of exception handling in Java or Oracle (for instance), but knowledge of the exception mechanism in general. I however disagree with the 'learn as many languages as you can' approach. Of course, knowledge of several programming environments helps enormously make the right architectural decisions, however I think that one thouroughly understood programming language + competency in a secondary one is better, as it shows the candidate can focus on essentials, is not afraid of making choices (as long as his choices are meaningful and he didn't choose a career based on Forth and Lisp) but can also invest intellectual resources in more than one direction.

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Not entirely

by alex.v In reply to Just Java...

Actually, as an Oracle (senior level) developer *** DBA, I think the idea of administering a test in a programming language that is not listed on the candidate's resume is interesting, in that it will separate thinkers from 'just coders', however it aims at a higher level employee (it won't test the specifics of exception handling in Java or Oracle (for instance), but knowledge of the exception mechanism in general. I however disagree with the 'learn as many languages as you can' approach. Of course, knowledge of several programming environments helps enormously make the right architectural decisions, however I think that one thouroughly understood programming language + competency in a secondary one is better, as it shows the candidate can focus on essentials, is not afraid of making choices (as long as his choices are meaningful and he didn't choose a career based on Forth and Lisp) but can also invest intellectual resources in more than one direction.

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I agree, partially :)

by spitts In reply to Just Java...

I agree that passion for programming is critical to be good at the task. I also agree that good analytical skills are vital.

However, I do not agree with learning as many languages as possible. I have worked with a few languarges such as C, VB, Script, COBOL, and XBASE. What I learned is that to be "good" with any language requires extensive use, and there isn't enough time in the day to be "good" with more than a couple. Any good programmer that has both passion and the necessary analytical skills can switch to a different language when necessary and get the job done. Personally, splitting my time between as many languages as possible I feel would be a waste. But, that's just me :)

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Agree to a point but...

by jim.bassett In reply to Just Java...

I agree with the ?passion? concept in regards to projects a person has worked on and I would add to that passion they display for a department or company succeeding but the multi languages I would not put as much emphasis on as this person does. Having multi language knowledge is always good but I maintain that a good programmer is able to pick up a new language so testing them over something they currently don?t know doesn?t make sense; it would be like testing someone over Japanese when they speak English. Plus I don?t agree that knowing more than one language means one has more passion for software than another, how many passionate writers know and write in multiple languages. Anyway this guys thoughts on this are of interest.

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Big Goof!

by mwelch4 In reply to Just Java...

What you will very likely get is a jack-of-all
languages and master-of-none! Have you ever counted
up your training costs and missed deadlines with this kind of misguided hiring???

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