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By BobArtner - TechRepublic ·
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Essential Books for Programmers?

by BobArtner - TechRepublic In reply to Bob's Blog

Over at the <a href="http://www.joelonsoftware.com/">Joel On Software blog</a>, Joel Spolsky has posted his list of the best books for programmers.

He created <a href="http://www.joelonsoftware.com/navLinks/fog0000000262.html">the list</a> back in 2002. It's amazing to me how influential Peopleware and Code Complete have been in the past decade.

I can't tell you how many list of top programming books I've seen that reference these two books.

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My last Star Wars post (probably)

by BobArtner - TechRepublic In reply to Bob's Blog

How can you resist a web site named <a href="http://www.capnwacky.com/sw/sw01.html">The Parade of Unfortunate Star Wars Costumes</a>.<br><br>I can't.<br><br><a href="http://www.capnwacky.com/sw/sw04.html">The back yard is secure!</a>

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Hacking and Social Engineering

by BobArtner - TechRepublic In reply to Bob's Blog

There is an interesting interview on Wired with three anonymous hackers claiming to be the ones behind the <a href="http://www.wired.com/news/business/0,1367,67629,00.html">data theft at LexisNexis</a>.<br><br>Apparently, they got access to LexisNexis from its Seisint subsidiary, which is an online database for law enforcement:<br><br><i>A friend of Krazed masqueraded as a 14-year-old girl online and engaged a Florida police officer in a chat session, the hackers said. The friend sent the officer an attachment, which he said was a slideshow containing naked pictures of the girl he was pretending to be. When the officer clicked on it, a Trojan horse downloaded silently to his computer, which gave Krazed complete access to the computer's files. </i><br><br>How would you like trying to explain that one to your boss?<br>

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Google Content Blocker

by BobArtner - TechRepublic In reply to Bob's Blog

<a href="http://j-walk.com/other/googlecb/index.htm">What is Google Content Blocker?</a><br><br>"Google's mission is to organize the world's advertising for maximum exposure to Web users. Unfortunately, annoying Web content often overwhelms the page, causing many users to become distracted and overlook the ads."<br><br>"That's where Google Content Blocker comes in. It effectively blocks all Web site content, leaving only the advertisements."

Clever.

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Knowledge Base RSS feed

by BobArtner - TechRepublic In reply to Bob's Blog

Microsoft has created a series of <a href="http://support.microsoft.com/selectindex/?target=rss">RSS feeds of Knowledge Base</a> articles. There are separate feeds for each product. 

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Corporate Blogging: a career path?

by BobArtner - TechRepublic In reply to Bob's Blog

<p>The Wall Street Journal has an interesting piece about a new job title: <a href="http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB111748967859946439,00.html?mod=technology%5Ffeatured%5Fstories%5Fhs">Chief Blogger</a>. (Article free for now, but I don't know for how long).</p>
<p>Here is the money graph:</p>
<p><em>A small but growing number of businesses are hiring people to write blogs, otherwise known as Web logs, or frequently updated online journals. Companies are looking for candidates who can write in a conversational style about timely topics that would appeal to customers, clients and potential recruits.</em></p>
<p>Another interesting data point from the article: Microsoft has 1,500 employee blogs.</p>

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If technologists are so smart, why can't they remember their own history?

by BobArtner - TechRepublic In reply to Bob's Blog

<p>This <a href="http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/459**47.stm">BBC story about Paul Mockapetris</a>, the inventor of the DNS system, receiving a lifetime acheivement award, struck a chord with me.</p>
<p>Why is it that the technology industry is so bad at remembering the achievements of those who built the industry? It's as if everyone who works in tech has a kind of collective amnesia.</p>
<p>I thought about this when I read about <a href="http://techrepublic.com.com/5254-6257-0.html?forumID=99&threadID=173892&messageID=1774655&id=3690253">George Dantzig's</a> passing recently. Dantzig was the inventor of the Simplex Method, the foundation of linear programming.</p>
<p>As Rex put it in his entry about Dantzig:</p>
<p><em>His discovery contributed so much to modern life. Could FedEx and UPS even exist without linear programming to optimize their delivery schedules? How would we route electric power efficiently across continental power grids? But while there's plenty of coverage for the </em><a href="em>season">http://www.cnn.com/2005/SHOWBIZ/TV/05/23/housewives.finale.ap/index.html"><em>season finale of Desperate Housewives</em></a><em>, the passing of a 20th-century giant goes largely un-noticed.</em></p>
<p>So why is it that we can't remember the giants who came before us?</p>
<p> </p>

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If technologists are so smart, why can't they remember their own history?

by jmgarvin In reply to If technologists are so s ...

It isn't "news" to the media.  While Dantzig should be a household
name, it isn't.  He did so much for programming (and computer
science in general) that he isn't forgotten by the "geeks."  He
was a great man and should have make more headlines with his
passing.  You have to wonder what will happen as the other greats
pass?  Sure there are the knobs that are politically involved and
come off as morons (Noam Chomsky comes to mind), but that doesn't
mitigate his contribution to the computing field.<br />
<br />
On that note there is an exceptionally sad part to this.  The post
Y2K world is turning into the 1980's all over again.  Why? 
We have great computer minds advancing the industry, but very few users
are educated (or care) enough to take note.  Computers are still
toys to most business and the CEO/CFO/COO don't understand you need a
staff of people to keep things humming...don't the damn things just
work?<br />
<br />
<br />

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If technologists are so smart, why can't they remember their own history?

You make a great point...don't know the answer, unfortunately.

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If technologists are so smart, why can't they remember their own history?

by gene.fellner In reply to If technologists are so s ...

<p>It infuriates me that the PC community acts as though mainframes never existed. They keep reinventing the wheel, and doing a pretty poor job of it. Deadlocks? Application program failures crashing the OS? We solved those problems on Univac mainframes more than 25 years ago.</p>
<p>But my personal favorite teeth-gnasher, the single reason that the so-called "information infrastructure" is nothing more than a glorified sandbox: Instructions masquerading as data and installing themselves in someone else's computer. You couldn't do that on a Univac mainframe. Instructions and data resided in physically separate areas of memory. You could not store anything into the instruction bank and you could not execute anything from the data bank.</p>
<p>The sandbox denizens who invented Windows get an F-minus in history. They wouldn't be allowed near an old mainframe shop with overalls and a mop.</p>
<p>Sure, the concept of securing a program library is different on a single-user PC than on a departmental mainframe. You don't have an operations staff with procedures that take a week to store a new version of a program in a production library, allowing time to verify that it wasn't compromised by a spy, criminal, or incompetent programmer. But hey, isn't everything supposed to be faster and more automated on PCs? Why don't we have software that does the job of the old production program librarians? More to the point, why don't the architects of the "information infrastructure" even care? They act as though it's one of the requirements of the technology to PERMIT strangers to infect each other's computers with cookies and whatnot.</p>
<p>Sorry, I guess I missed that day in sex education. We were taught never to accept cookies from strangers.</p>

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