After Hours

Our forums are currently in maintenance mode and the ability to post is disabled. We will be back up and running as soon as possible. Thanks for your patience!

General discussion

Locked

CodeWarriorz Thoughts

By codewarrior.wins ·
Tags: Off Topic
blog root

This conversation is currently closed to new comments.

Thread display: Collapse - | Expand +

All Comments

Collapse -

CBS News | Ivy League Prof Sifts Through BS | May 16, 2005?02:24:33

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<a href="http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/05/12/60minutes/main694849.shtml">CBS News | Ivy League Prof Sifts Through BS | May 16, 2005?02:24:33</a>Ivy League Prof Sifts Through BS
<br />(Page 1 of 9)
<br />
<br />May 15, 2005
<br />
<br />
<br />
<br />Professor Studies BS
<br />
<br />
<br />The success of philosopher Harry Frankfurt's book on BS suggests that he's touched a nerve in the American psyche. (Photo: CBS)
<br />
<br />
<br />
<br />"There?s a certain titillation in the fact that an Ivy League professor is writing about a topic which is designated by this barnyard term. ... And I think people are fed up with being fed bull----."
<br />Harry Frankfurt
<br />
<br />
<br />Frankfurt joined the great American BS celebrity parade for his first live TV interview about the subject, on Jon Stewart's "The Daily Show." (Photo: CBS)
<br />
<br />
<br />Laura Penny has written a book titled, "Your Call Is Important To Us: The Truth About BS." (Photo: CBS)
<br />
<br />
<br />"On ********"
<br />by Harry Frankfurt
<br />
<br />
<br />(CBS) Prudishness prevents us from using the word, but it is one that is familiar to almost everyone, and almost everyone engages in spreading it around at one time or another.
<br />
<br />For propriety?s sake, we?ll call it BS. It could be defined as hyped-up, boastful, insincere or pretentious talk. And it?s so prevalent in American life that it?s caught the attention of our deepest thinkers.
<br />
<br />There is a bestseller on the stands, a phenomenon of sorts, by a leading American academic. It is called ?On Bull----,? and it's a serious work by a serious man about a subject that seems to inundate us at every turn. Correspondent Morley Safer reports.
<br />--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<br />The success of philosopher Harry Frankfurt's 67-page book about truth, lies and that vast putrid wasteland in between suggests that he?s touched a nerve, the BS nerve, in the American psyche.
<br />
<br />"I think there is, in the population at large, a yearning for living in an environment in which you can really believe what people tell you, and in which people who hold responsible positions or who are aspiring to responsible positions can be trusted to tell you the truth, and not try to fool you and not to try to pull the wool over your eyes and not to try to manipulate your beliefs," says Frankfurt.
<br />
<br />Was he surprised or shocked by the success of this book?
<br />
<br />"I am surprised by the response, and I attribute it to a couple of things," says Frankfurt. "First of all, there?s a certain titillation in the fact that an Ivy League professor is writing about a topic which is designated by this barnyard term. But I think also people are starved for the truth. And I think people are fed up with being fed bull----."
<br />
<br />With hundreds of TV channels running 24 hours a day, with thousands of new products to be advertised each year, with political rhetoric, lobbyists, PR, spin, and phony news reports put out by the government, and with the trivialities of a celebrity-obsessed culture, BS rules the world.
<br />
<br />
</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/06/cbs-news-ivy-league-prof-sifts-through.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

Collapse -

May's job gains weakest in 2 years

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<a href="http://www.tucsoncitizen.com/index.php?page=business&story_id=060405b5_jobs">May's job gains weakest in 2 years</a>May's job gains weakest in 2 years
<br />
<br />The Associated Press
<br />
<br />
<br />The Associated Press
<br />
<br />A landscaping company advertises for help along a busy roadway in Chesterland, Ohio.
<br />advertisement
<br />
<br />WASHINGTON - For job seekers, bosses and investors, monthly ups and downs of the nation's employment figures are like riding a jerky roller coaster.
<br />The latest report, released by the Labor Department yesterday, showed job growth slowed nearly to a crawl in May. But the unemployment rate dipped to 5.1 percent.
<br />
<br />Employers boosted payrolls by 78,000 after a hiring spurt of 274,000 in April.
<br />
<br />May's job gains were the weakest in almost two years.
<br />
<br />Economists offered several reasons for May's moderation: the toll of high energy prices squeezing bottom lines, companies reducing production to work off excess goods on shelves and back lots, cool weather and a statistical payback after the strong job figures in April.
<br />
<br />Job cuts last month were reported in categories including manufacturing, leisure and hospitality, accounting and bookkeeping and temporary help. Those losses tempered gains in retail, construction, education, health care and elsewhere.
<br />
<br />Lackluster job growth performance raises the odds the Federal Reserve may slow - or soon end - its yearlong campaign to tighten credit, many economists agreed.
<br />
<br />Despite slow growth in payrolls, the civilian unemployment rate declined fractionally last month - to 5.1 percent.
<br />
<br />That was down a notch from April's 5.2 percent jobless rate.
<br />
<br />"You have both a bit of sweet and a bit of sour in the report," said Mark Zandi, chief economist at Economy.com.
<br />
<br />
<br />
</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/06/mays-job-gains-weakest-in-2-years.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

Collapse -

FPI 2005: A 'no' to the new world order

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<a href="http://fpiarticle.blogspot.com/2005/06/no-to-new-world-order.html">FPI 2005: A 'no' to the new world order</a>
<br />I think this is an excellent article / blogpost by GREG ERICSON and makes a serious point!</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/06/fpi-2005-no-to-new-world-order.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

Collapse -

United States Economy at a Glance

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<a href="http://www.bls.gov/eag/eag.us.htm">United States Economy at a Glance</a>Data Series Back
<br />Data Dec
<br /> 2004 Jan
<br /> 2005 Feb
<br /> 2005 Mar
<br /> 2005 Apr
<br /> 2005 May
<br /> 2005
<br />Unemployment Rate (1) 5.4 5.2 5.4 5.2 5.2 5.1
<br />Change in Payroll Employment (2) 155 124 300 122 274 (P) 78 (P)
<br />Average Hourly Earnings (3) 15.85 15.90 15.** 15.95 16.00 (P) 16.03 (P)
<br />Consumer Price Index (4) 0.0 0.1 0.4 0.6 0.5
<br />Producer Price Index (5) -0.3 0.1 (P) 0.4 (P) 0.7 (P) 0.6 (P)
<br />U.S. Import Price Index (6) -1.4 0.6 0.9 2.0 0.8
<br />Employment Cost Index (7) 0.8 0.7
<br />Productivity ( 2.3 2.9
<br />
<br />Footnotes:
<br />
<br />(P) Preliminary
<br />(1) In percent, seasonally adjusted. Annual averages are available for Not Seasonally Adjusted data.
<br />(2) Number of jobs, in thousands, seasonally adjusted
<br />(3) For production and nonsupervisory workers on private nonfarm payrolls, seasonally adjusted
<br />(4) All items, U.S. city average, all urban consumers, 1982-84=100, 1-month percent change, seasonally adjusted
<br />(5) Finished goods, 1982=100, 1-month percent change, seasonally adjusted
<br />(6) All imports, 1-month percent change, not seasonally adjusted
<br />(7) Compensation, all civilian workers, quarterly data, 3-month percent change, seasonally adjusted
<br />( Output per hour, nonfarm business, quarterly data, percent change from previous quarter at annual rate, seasonally adjusted
<br />
<br />
<br />Data extracted on: June 3, 2005
<br />
<br />Source: U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
<br />Note: More data series, including additional geographic areas, are available through the "Get Detailed Statistics" link at the top of this page
<br />
<br />
</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/06/united-states-economy-at-glance.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

Collapse -

AMERICAblog: Because a great nation deserves the truth

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts
Collapse -

CodeWarriorz Thoughts - ENewsBlog

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

<a href="http://enewsblog.com/codewarriorz/post/2005-06-04_14:53:42/">CodeWarriorz Thoughts - ENewsBlog</a>
<br /><img src="p><div">http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v210/codewarrior/bolton.jpg"><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/06/codewarriorz-thoughts-enewsblog.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

Collapse -

BetaNews | News.com Says Apple Switching to Intel

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<a href="http://www.betanews.com/article/CNET_Claims_Apple_Switching_to_Intel/1117894429">BetaNews | News.com Says Apple Switching to Intel</a>News.com Says Apple Switching to Intel
<br />By Ed Oswald, BetaNews
<br />June 4, 2005, 10:13 AM
<br />CNET News.com claims that Apple will announce a switch to Intel x86 processors on Monday at its annual Worldwide Developers Conference - a move that has been rumored for years yet never materialized. According to the report, the switch would start with Apple's low-end computers by the middle of next year, with higher end systems following in 2007.
<br />
<br />The report has not been without questions to its validity and most analysts remain skeptical due to numerous unanswered problems that would arise from such a major architecture change. News.com did not address several issues, including the lack of emulation for easing the transition and necessary support from major third-party developers such as Adobe and Microsoft.
<br />
<br />
<br />
</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/06/betanews-newscom-says-apple-switching.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

Collapse -

Lexington Herald-Leader | 06/03/2005 | CDC detectives study obesity outbreak in West Virginia

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<a href="http://www.kentucky.com/mld/heraldleader/news/state/11803022.htm">Lexington Herald-Leader | 06/03/2005 | CDC detectives study obesity outbreak in West Virginia</a>CDC detectives study obesity outbreak in West Virginia
<br />
<br />AGENCY'S INQUIRY OF 2 AREAS IN STATE WILL BE PIONEERING
<br />
<br />By Gina Kolata
<br />
<br />NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE
<br />
<br />
<br />For the first time, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has sent a team of specialists into a state, West Virginia, to study an outbreak of obesity in the same way it studies an outbreak of an infectious disease.
<br />
<br />Kerri Kennedy, the program manager at the West Virginia Physical Activity and Nutrition Program, said the state had requested the investigation by the centers.
<br />
<br />"We were looking at our data," Kennedy said, and saw that "we are facing a severe health crisis."
<br />
<br />The state ranked third in the nation for obesity -- 27.6 percent of its adults were obese as compared with 20.4 percent in the rest of the country. And, Kennedy said, "our rate of obesity appears to be increasing faster than the rest of the nation."
<br />
<br />So the state asked the agency's disease detectives to tackle its obesity problem, and a three-week investigation began on April 25. It focused, Kennedy said, on two places that represented towns and cities in the state -- Gilmer County, with 7,160 residents, and Clarksburg, a city with 16,743 residents.
<br />
<br />The investigative teams spent a week and a half in each place, going to schools and asking about physical education programs and what sort of food was provided. They went to workplaces, asking whether there were policies to encourage physical activity. They went to randomly selected grocery stores and restaurants, asking whether they offered fruits and vegetables and skim or 1 percent milk.
<br />
<br />The director of the centers, Dr. Julie L. Gerberding, said in a news conference yesterday that this type of investigation was a first for the agency.
<br />
<br />"This has never happened in the history of the CDC," she said.
<br />
</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/06/lexington-herald-leader-06032005-cdc.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

Collapse -

Dominick Dunne vs. Robert Kennedy

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<a href="http://newyorkmetro.com/nymetro/news/crimelaw/features/n_8816/">Dominick Dunne vs. Robert Kennedy</a>
</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/06/dominick-dunne-vs-robert-kennedy.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

Collapse -

CBS News | Ivy League Prof Sifts Through BS | May 16, 2005?02:24:33

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<a href="http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/05/12/60minutes/main694849.shtml">CBS News | Ivy League Prof Sifts Through BS | May 16, 2005?02:24:33</a>Ivy League Prof Sifts Through BS
<br />(Page 1 of 9)
<br />
<br />May 15, 2005
<br />
<br />
<br />
<br />Professor Studies BS
<br />
<br />
<br />The success of philosopher Harry Frankfurt's book on BS suggests that he's touched a nerve in the American psyche. (Photo: CBS)
<br />
<br />
<br />
<br />"There?s a certain titillation in the fact that an Ivy League professor is writing about a topic which is designated by this barnyard term. ... And I think people are fed up with being fed bull----."
<br />Harry Frankfurt
<br />
<br />
<br />Frankfurt joined the great American BS celebrity parade for his first live TV interview about the subject, on Jon Stewart's "The Daily Show." (Photo: CBS)
<br />
<br />
<br />Laura Penny has written a book titled, "Your Call Is Important To Us: The Truth About BS." (Photo: CBS)
<br />
<br />
<br />"On ********"
<br />by Harry Frankfurt
<br />
<br />
<br />(CBS) Prudishness prevents us from using the word, but it is one that is familiar to almost everyone, and almost everyone engages in spreading it around at one time or another.
<br />
<br />For propriety?s sake, we?ll call it BS. It could be defined as hyped-up, boastful, insincere or pretentious talk. And it?s so prevalent in American life that it?s caught the attention of our deepest thinkers.
<br />
<br />There is a bestseller on the stands, a phenomenon of sorts, by a leading American academic. It is called ?On Bull----,? and it's a serious work by a serious man about a subject that seems to inundate us at every turn. Correspondent Morley Safer reports.
<br />--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<br />The success of philosopher Harry Frankfurt's 67-page book about truth, lies and that vast putrid wasteland in between suggests that he?s touched a nerve, the BS nerve, in the American psyche.
<br />
<br />"I think there is, in the population at large, a yearning for living in an environment in which you can really believe what people tell you, and in which people who hold responsible positions or who are aspiring to responsible positions can be trusted to tell you the truth, and not try to fool you and not to try to pull the wool over your eyes and not to try to manipulate your beliefs," says Frankfurt.
<br />
<br />Was he surprised or shocked by the success of this book?
<br />
<br />"I am surprised by the response, and I attribute it to a couple of things," says Frankfurt. "First of all, there?s a certain titillation in the fact that an Ivy League professor is writing about a topic which is designated by this barnyard term. But I think also people are starved for the truth. And I think people are fed up with being fed bull----."
<br />
<br />With hundreds of TV channels running 24 hours a day, with thousands of new products to be advertised each year, with political rhetoric, lobbyists, PR, spin, and phony news reports put out by the government, and with the trivialities of a celebrity-obsessed culture, BS rules the world.
<br />
<br />
</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/06/cbs-news-ivy-league-prof-sifts-through.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

Related Discussions

Related Forums