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CodeWarriorz Thoughts

By codewarrior.wins ·
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Cheney May Be Entangled in CIA Leak Investigation

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

Cheney May Be Entangled in CIA Leak Investigation (Update3)
<br />Oct. 17 (Bloomberg) -- A special counsel is focusing on whether Vice President **** Cheney played a role in leaking a covert CIA agent's name, according to people familiar with the probe that already threatens top White House aides Karl Rove and Lewis Libby.
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<br />The special counsel, Patrick Fitzgerald, has questioned current and former officials of President George W. Bush's administration about whether Cheney was involved in an effort to discredit the agent's husband, Iraq war critic and former U.S. diplomat Joseph Wilson, according to the people.
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<br />Fitzgerald has questioned Cheney's communications adviser Catherine Martin and former spokeswoman Jennifer Millerwise about the vice president's knowledge of the anti-Wilson campaign and his dealings on it with Libby, his chief of staff, the people said. The information came from multiple sources, who requested anonymity because of the secrecy and political sensitivity of the investigation.
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<br />New York Times reporter Judith Miller, who has now testified twice before a federal grand jury probing the case after spending 85 days in jail for refusing to cooperate with Fitzgerald, wrote in yesterday's New York Times that Fitzgerald asked her whether the vice president ``had known what his chief aide,'' Libby, ``was doing and saying'' regarding Wilson, a critic of the war in Iraq.
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<br />Potential `Big Case'
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<br />Fitzgerald has told lawyers involved in the case that he hopes to conclude it soon -- the grand jury's term expires Oct. 28, although it could be extended -- and there is a growing sense among knowledgeable observers that the outcome will involve serious criminal charges. ``Fitzgerald is putting together a big case,'' Washington attorney Robert Bennett, who represents Miller, said yesterday on ABC's ``This Week.''
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<br />The charges could range from a broad conspiracy case to more narrowly drawn indictments for obstruction of justice or perjury, according to lawyers involved in the case. Charges are considered less likely on the law that initially triggered Fitzgerald's probe, which makes it illegal to deliberately unmask an undercover intelligence agent, because of the difficulty in meeting that statute's exacting standards for prosecution.
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<br />Lea Anne McBride, a Cheney spokesman, declined to comment yesterday on whether the vice president, 64, has been contacted by Fitzgerald about his status in the case, except to say: ``This is an ongoing investigation, and we are fully cooperating.'' White House spokesman Scott McClellan wouldn't comment on the probe today, citing a request from the special prosecutor. Randall Samborn, a Fitzgerald spokesman, declined to comment, and calls to Robert Luskin, Rove's attorney, and Joseph Tate, Libby's lawyer, weren't returned.
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<br />Options
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<br />There's no indication Fitzgerald is considering criminal charges against the vice president, who gave unsworn testimony to investigators last year. One option for Fitzgerald is to outline his findings about Cheney's role if he files a final report on the investigation.
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<br />Fitzgerald, 45, has also questioned administration officials about any knowledge Bush may have had of the campaign against Wilson. Yet most administration observers have noted that on Iraq, as with most matters, it's Cheney who has played the more hands-on role.
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<br />``Anything dealing with intelligence, no matter how big or how small, Cheney is involved in it,'' Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid of Nevada said in an interview. ``This is his portfolio, and he guards it very well.''
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<br />Pursuit of Evidence
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<br />One lawyer intimately involved in the case, who like the others demanded anonymity, said one reason Fitzgerald was willing to send Miller to jail to compel testimony was because he was pursuing evidence the vice president may have been aware of the specifics of the anti-Wilson strategy.
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<br />And both U.S. District Court Judge Thomas Hogan and an appellate-court panel -- including David Tatel, a First Amendment advocate -- said they ruled in Fitzgerald's favor because of the gravity of the case.
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<br />Katy Harriger, a political scientist at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, who has written extensively about special-counsel investigations, said the pace and trajectory of Fitzgerald's probe suggests it will end with the indictment of Rove, Libby or both.
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<br />Harriger said she anticipates indictments in part because of the special prosecutor's willingness to jail Miller. ``That's not something you do unless you really have something more going on that isn't obvious to the public,'' she said.
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<br />Avenues of Investigation
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<br />Larry Barcella, a former assistant U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia, said the recent activity in the case suggests criminal charges are likely, although not in connection with the 1982 law making it illegal to disclose a covert agent's identity.
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<br />A more likely focus is possible ``false statements, conspiracy or obstruction of justice,'' said Barcella, now a defense lawyer for the Washington-based law firm of Paul, Hastings, Janofsky & Walker. ``It's obviously not good that Rove and Libby have spent so much time before the grand jury.''
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<br />To make a case against Cheney as part of a conspiracy indictment, Fitzgerald would have to show the vice president was an active participant in a decision to smear Wilson, Barcella said. ``It's a case most easily made if you can prove a person knowingly entered into an agreement to do something illegal,'' he said. ``Beyond that, it can be tricky.''
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<br />Fitzgerald's status differs in one potentially important respect from the independent counsels who investigated alleged wrongdoing during earlier administrations. They reported to a panel of appellate judges, while Fitzgerald reports to the Justice Department.
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<br />Given the prospect of both protracted criminal cases and then civil lawsuits, it now seems possible the issue will bedevil the final years of Bush's presidency, much as the Iran-contra affair burdened President Ronald Reagan's second term and the Monica Lewinsky scandal plagued President Bill Clinton's.
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<br />No Leaks
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<br />While there have been virtually no leaks out of Fitzgerald's office, and even the subjects of his investigation are unsure about his intentions, White House officials and Bush supporters are fearful that recent developments spell legal jeopardy for Rove, the central strategist behind Bush's political campaigns and much of his presidency, and Libby, a key architect of the Iraq war strategy.
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<br />When the investigation began, White House officials asserted that neither Rove nor Libby played any role in the outing of Plame, and both aides told Fitzgerald that they learned of her identity from journalists.
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<br />Reporter's Account
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<br />In her Times account, Miller said she told Fitzgerald and the grand jury that Libby, 55, raised the subject of Wilson's wife during a meeting with Miller on June 23, 2003. That was before Wilson, 55, went public in a Times op-ed piece with his accusation that Bush and his aides had ``twisted'' intelligence findings to justify invading Iraq, although administration officials knew he was privately critical.
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<br />While Miller didn't say Libby had identified Plame as a covert agent, her account calls into question Libby's assertion that he first learned of Plame's identity from reporters.
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<br />Miller, 57, said she went to jail rather than testify because, unlike other reporters, she didn't feel Libby had given her specific and voluntary permission to speak about their confidential conversations. She relented when Libby contacted her by telephone and letter last month, saying he had always expected her to testify.
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<br />Those communications with Miller may pose legal problems for Libby. His letter to her stated that ``the public report of every other reporter's testimony makes clear that they did not discuss Ms. Plame's name or identity with me.''
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<br />Surprise
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<br />Miller wrote in her Times article that Fitzgerald asked her to read that portion of the letter aloud to the grand jurors and asked for her reaction to Libby's words. She said that part of the letter had ``surprised me because it might be perceived as an effort by Mr. Libby to suggest that I, too, would say we had not discussed Ms. Plame's identity. Yet my notes suggested that we had discussed her job.''
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<br />Bennett, Miller's attorney, yesterday called that part of Libby's letter ``a very stupid thing to do.'' Other lawyers suggested it could become part of any obstruction-of-justice charge Fitzgerald might bring.
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<br />Rove's testimony also has been contradicted by others, such as Time magazine reporter Matt Cooper. He said his July 2003 conversation with the White House aide focused more on Wilson and his wife than Rove had testified, while adding Rove had not identified her by name. There is also at least one discrepancy between Rove's version and that of columnist Robert Novak, who first identified Plame as a Central Intelligence Agency operative in July 2003, according to persons familiar with their accounts.
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<br />Return for Testimony
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<br />Rove, 54, returned to the grand jury for a fourth time on Oct. 14 and testified for more than four hours. His lawyer, Luskin, who has spoken frequently with reporters, has gone from public optimism that his client faces little legal danger to cautiously noting only that Fitzgerald hasn't told them Rove is a ``target.''
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<br />Bush refused to comment when asked by a reporter today whether he would expect a member of his administration to resign or take leave if indicted.
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<br />``There's a serious investigation,'' Bush said. ``I'm not going to pre-judge the outcome.''
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<br />Wilson was dispatched by the CIA in February 2002 to investigate reports, since discredited, that Saddam Hussein's regime was trying to buy uranium in Niger as part of a nuclear- weapons program. After Bush cited similar reports in his Jan. 28, 2003, State of the Union speech and the U.S. invaded Iraq in March of that year, Wilson began telling some journalists anonymously that the claim was questionable.
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<br />Reacting to Wilson
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<br />That prompted behind-the-scenes administration attempts to discredit Wilson. In his June 2003 meeting with Miller, Libby told her, in the context of a conversation critical of the CIA, that Wilson's wife worked for the spy agency, according to an account published in the Times yesterday.
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<br />Wilson went public with his criticism on July 6, 2003. In his Times piece, he concluded: ``Some of the intelligence related to Iraq's nuclear weapons program was twisted to exaggerate the Iraqi threat.''
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<br />Over the next week, Libby and Rove talked to reporters, on the condition they not be identified, about Wilson's article and the fact that his CIA-employed wife may have had a role in giving him the Niger assignment.
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<br />Publication
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<br />Plame's identity was first published by Novak on July 14. He cited ``two senior administration officials'' as the sources of the information that Plame, 42, suggested Wilson for the Niger trip. Novak hasn't commented publicly on those sources.
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<br />Miller never wrote a story about Wilson or his wife -- although in one of her notebooks, dated July 8, 2003, a notation appears for ``Valerie Flame.''
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<br />One of the subplots is the role played by the New York Times. In addition to Miller's personal account, the Times yesterday published a separate 5,800-word piece that criticized both Miller and the way the newspaper handled the story.
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<br />The article reported the paper's publisher, Arthur Sulzberger Jr., and its executive editor, Bill Keller, unequivocally supported their reporter in her legal battle although ``they knew few details about Ms. Miller's conversations with her confidential source,'' and ``did not review'' her notes.
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<br />Miller, who wrote many influential pre-war war stories about Hussein's purported weapons of mass destruction that the Times later acknowledged were flawed, told the grand jury she recommended in 2003 that the newspaper pursue the Plame story. Jill Abramson, the newspaper's managing editor, said Miller never made any such recommendation.
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<br />In an interview yesterday, Wilson said that once the criminal questions are settled, he and his wife may file a civil lawsuit against Bush, Cheney and others seeking damages for the alleged harm done to Plame's career.
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<br />If they do so, the current state of the law makes it likely that the suit will be allowed to proceed -- and Bush and Cheney will face questioning under oath -- while they are in office. The reason for that is a unanimous 1997 U.S. Supreme Court decision ruling that Paula Jones' sexual harassment suit against then- President Clinton could go forward immediately, a decision that was hailed by conservatives at the time.
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<br /><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/10/cheney-may-be-entangled-in-cia-leak.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Oregon Daily Emerald - University of Oregon news and sports - The Cartman Connection

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">The Cartman Connection
<br />In my opinion
<br />By Army Feth
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<br />October 19, 2005
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<br />It may happen tomorrow. It may happen Friday. It may be happening right now as you read this. Hopefully it does not happen after my deadline today, making this intro outdated. But if it does happen, it may well be as early as this week. I am talking about the possible indictment of White House officials in the Plamegate scandal.
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<br />In other news, Comedy Central has been playing a countdown of Cartman?s 25 Greatest Moments to amp up viewers for tonight?s season premiere of South Park.
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<br />I?ve been following both stories, and as I eagerly await well-deserved indictments and well-written satire, I have noticed a few similarities. Basically, Karl Rove and Eric Cartman are freakishly similar.
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<br />Both are chubby, arguably pure evil and definitely vengeful. Neither is opposed to exploiting others for personal gain. Both feel a sense of entitlement that seems unfounded to the rest of us. Both play off the fear and ignorance of others. Both Rove and Cartman?s friends know these things, and allow them to pursue their outrageous plans.
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<br />There are very specific allusions to Karl Rove through the character of Cartman. Take for example, episode number 95, ?My Future Self n? Me.? Cartman is the man behind ?The Parental Revenge Center of Western America,? the place where Butters and Stan go to seek revenge on their parents. As it turns out, Cartman?s only plan involves smearing poo all over the parents? homes. Karl Rove is, likewise, known for his smear tactics, especially revenge. President Bush?s nickname for Rove is ?Turd Blossom.? The Parental Revenge Center of Western America could easily be renamed The Dissenter Revenge Center of America with Rove taking Cartman?s place as leader.
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<br />In ?The Passion of The Jew,? Cartman leads a neo-Christian movement. The basis for his beliefs is the movie, ?The Passion of The Christ,? which he has seen 34 times. Cartman starts a ?Mel Gibson ?The Passion? Fan Club?, and recruits evangelical Christians to join his mission. It was Karl Rove?s strategy to target evangelicals during the 2004 election. The Christians Cartman gathered simply wanted to celebrate their rebirth, while Cartman ultimately wanted them all to go see ?The Passion of The Christ? again. Karl Rove wanted deeply religious citizens to vote for George W. Bush. Both Rove and Cartman exploit people?s genuine religious beliefs in order to further their own self-serving causes.
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<br />Revenge by Rove and Cartman is also often grossly disproportionate to the harm they endure. An episode rated by viewers as one of Cartman?s greatest moments was ?Scott Tenorman Must Die.? In this episode, Cartman is fooled and humiliated several times by Scott Tenorman. Each time, it is because Cartman has done something stupid and has been caught or called out on it. In the end, Cartman devises a successful plan ending with tricking Tenorman into eating his own dead parents, then getting his heroes (Radiohead) to laugh at him when he finally breaks down. The plan is brilliant, well thought out and completely ruthless.
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<br />Outing Valerie Plame as a CIA agent is an equally disproportionate revenge. Plame?s husband, Joseph Wilson, traveled to Africa and wrote an essay about the absence of ?yellowcake? uranium. His article accused the Bush administration of ?exaggerating the Iraqi threat.? Soon, Robert Novak leaked the fact that Plame was a CIA agent. This may be treason. By leaking the information, Rove endangered the safety of Plame, Wilson, and their families. He also ruined the career of a woman whose job was to track weapons of mass destruction. Rove?s plan was equally well-planned, evil and brilliant.
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<br />Both Cartman and Rove do not directly execute revenge , but rather manipulate others to do their dirty business. Rove used journalists to do something he knew was illegal. He counted on them to protect him if they got in trouble, because good journalists are supposed to ensure the confidentiality of their anonymous sources. And if they do squeal to avoid jail, like Novak, then they appear cowardly. If they don?t squeal even with permission, like Judith Miller, they appear overly-loyal and biased. Either way, the institution of journalism is tarnished by this. Branding the media as untrustworthy is a major underlying theme in Rove?s quest to control America. If Rove is indicted and convicted though, he is almost certainly assured a pardon by President Bush.
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<br />Much as they are similar, we have to remember that Cartman is not real and Rove is. Most of the time, Cartman ends up getting what is coming to him by the end of the episode. Let?s hope Rove gets what is coming to him at the end of this two-year drama.
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</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/10/oregon-daily-emerald-university-of.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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DeLay Ordered to Texas for Booking

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">RICHMOND, Texas -- Rep. Tom DeLay was ordered to appear at the sheriff's office in his home county of Fort Bend for booking on state conspiracy and money laundering charges.
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<br />A state court issued an arrest warrant on Wednesday for DeLay and set an initial $10,000 bail, a routine step before the Texas Republican's first court appearance Friday in Austin.
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<br />Representative Tom Delay, R-Tex., talks to reporters on Capitol Hill in this Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2005 file photo. A Texas court issued a warrant Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2005, for former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay to appear for booking, where he is likely to face the fingerprinting and photo mug shot he had hoped to avoid. (AP Photo/Dennis Cook, FILE) (Dennis Cook - AP)
<br />DeLay could be fingerprinted and photographed, although his lawyers had hoped to avoid this step.
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<br />Fort Bend County Chief Deputy Craig Brady said arrangements were being made to bring DeLay to the sheriff's office sometime Thursday for booking and fingerprinting.
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<br />The process was expected to take 45 minutes to an hour.
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<br />DeLay has stepped down as U.S. House majority leader _ at least temporarily _ under a Republican rule requiring him to relinquish the post if charged with a felony.
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<br />Two grand juries have charged DeLay and two political associates in an alleged scheme to violate state election law, by funneling corporate donations to candidates for the Texas Legislature. State law prohibits use of corporate donations to finance state campaigns, although the money can be used for administrative expenses.
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<br />The indictments charge that a DeLay-founded Texas political committee sent corporate donations to the Republican National Committee in Washington, and the national party sent funds back to the state for 2002 campaigns.
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<br />DeLay has denied wrongdoing and accused Travis County District Attorney Ronnie Earle _ a Democrat _ of having partisan motives. Earle has denied the accusation.
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<br />Earle did not ask for the arrest warrant for DeLay, but approved the court's request, his office said Wednesday.
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<br />DeLay's Republican fundraising in 2002 had major political consequences, allowing the GOP to take control of the Texas Legislature. The Legislature then redrew congressional boundaries according to a DeLay-inspired plan, took command of the state's U.S. House delegation and helped the GOP retain its House majority.
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</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/10/delay-ordered-to-texas-for-booking.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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MUGSHOT OF TOM DELAY...ARRESTED

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<a href="http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/5503/396/1600/mugshot21.jpg">
<img alt="" border="0" src="http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/5503/396/320/mugshot21.jpg" style="float:left; margin:0 10px 10px 0;cursor:pointer; cursor:hand;" />
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<br />HE LOOKS LIKE HE'S REALLY HAPPY ABOUT BEING ARRESTED.</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/10/mugshot-of-tom-delayarrested.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Republican reps: It's "another world war" | World War 4 Report

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">Republican reps: It's "another world war"
<br />Submitted by Bill Weinberg on Sat, 10/22/2005 - 03:31.
<br />Condoleeza Rice spilled the beans in Congressional testimony: there really is (as we always suspected) a White House plan to redesign the Middle East! Capitol Hill liberals like Barbara Boxer squawk about the administration's "unbelievable rewriting of history" in changing the justification for the Iraq invasion after the fact. But Republicans are unrepentant: its a new world war, deal with it. From the Washington Times, Oct. 20:
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<br />Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said yesterday that it was always the Bush administration's intent to redesign the Middle East after the September 11 attacks, which exposed a "deep malignancy growing" in the region, and that the Iraq war was part of that plan.
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<br />Miss Rice, in her first testimony on Capitol Hill in eight months, refused to outline benchmarks for reducing the U.S. troop levels in Iraq.
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<br />Instead, she offered a short-term strategy to stabilize the country, including the creation of civil-military teams in key provinces, but that plan was met with skepticism by both Republican and Democratic senators on the Foreign Relations Committee.
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<br />"Even if withdrawal timelines are deemed unwise because they might provide a strategic advantage to the insurgency, the American people need to more fully understand the basis upon which our troops are likely to come home," said Sen. Richard G. Lugar, Indiana Republican and committee chairman.
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<br />"We have to level with the American people," said Sen. George V. Voinovich, Ohio Republican. "This is another world war."
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<br />Which of course raises the question of which world war is this?
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</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/10/republican-reps-its-another-world-war.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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China Declares Only "Healthy And Civilized" News Allowed On Its Websites? | The Huffington Post

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2005/09/25/china-declares-only-heal_n_7873.html">China Declares Only "Healthy And Civilized" News Allowed On Its Websites? | The Huffington Post</a>China said Sunday it is imposing new regulations to control content on its news Web sites and will allow the posting of only "healthy and civilized" news.
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<br />The move is part of China's ongoing efforts to police the country's 100-million Internet population. Only the United States, with 135 million users, has more.
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</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/10/china-declares-only-healthy-and.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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China Declares Only "Healthy And Civilized" News Allowed On Its Websites? | The Huffington Post

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2005/09/25/china-declares-only-heal_n_7873.html">China Declares Only "Healthy And Civilized" News Allowed On Its Websites? | The Huffington Post</a>China said Sunday it is imposing new regulations to control content on its news Web sites and will allow the posting of only "healthy and civilized" news.
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<br />The move is part of China's ongoing efforts to police the country's 100-million Internet population. Only the United States, with 135 million users, has more.
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</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/10/china-declares-only-healthy-and.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Why is Tom DeLay smiling?

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<a href="http://www.suntimes.com/output/news/cst-nws-delay22.html">Why is Tom DeLay smiling?</a>Why is Tom DeLay smiling?
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<br />October 22, 2005
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<br />BY LAURIE KELLMAN Advertisement
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<br />WASHINGTON -- Why is Tom DeLay smiling? He has been indicted. Forced out of his job as House majority leader. And called into court for fingerprinting and a mug shot like a common criminal.
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<br />Answer: A photo of DeLay grinning from ear to ear doesn't pack the punch in a Democratic attack ad as one that looks more like the mug shot of, say, actor Hugh Grant.
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<br />DeLay looks in the photo like a proud member of Congress who might just have won the lottery, not one indicted on charges of money laundering. The photo looks like it could have been taken anywhere. That was just the point.
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<br />Democrats already sound as if they'll make DeLay the poster boy for bad Republican behavior in next year's elections, when every House seat and a third of the ones in the Senate are up for grabs.
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<br />So for anyone who didn't get it, DeLay's lawyer, **** DeGuerin, articulated the message: ''If you saw Congressman DeLay's mug shot, he was smiling,'' DeGuerin said. ''He's eager and he's ready to go.''
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<br />First court appearance
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<br />DeLay appeared Friday in an Austin, Texas, courtroom for the first time since his indictment, but his arraignment on conspiracy and money laundering charges was delayed pending a hearing on his request for a new judge.
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<br />DeLay did not speak during the brief session, and was not called on to make a plea. At a news conference afterward, he said: ''I will absolutely be exonerated.''
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<br />DeGuerin noted that Judge Bob Perkins had donated money to MoveOn.org, a liberal group that he said has been ''selling T-shirts with Mr. DeLay's mug shot on it.''
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<br />MoveOn.org denied it was selling any such shirts.
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</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/10/why-is-tom-delay-smiling.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Colleges Protest Call to Upgrade Online Systems - New York Times

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/23/technology/23college.html?hp&ex=1130040000&en=82e2a961640ae05b&ei=5094&partner=homepage">Colleges Protest Call to Upgrade Online Systems - New York Times</a>The federal government, vastly extending the reach of an 11-year-old law, is requiring hundreds of universities, online communications companies and cities to overhaul their Internet computer networks to make it easier for law enforcement authorities to monitor e-mail and other online communications.
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<br />Skip to next paragraph
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<br />Phil Sears for The New York Times
<br />Larry D. Conrad of Florida State University calls the order to upgrade Internet systems "overkill."
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<br /> Related Site: Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (fcc.gov) The action, which the government says is intended to help catch terrorists and other criminals, has unleashed protests and the threat of lawsuits from universities, which argue that it will cost them at least $7 billion while doing little to apprehend lawbreakers. Because the government would have to win court orders before undertaking surveillance, the universities are not raising civil liberties issues.
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<br />The order, issued by the Federal Communications Commission in August and first published in the Federal Register last week, extends the provisions of a 1994 wiretap law not only to universities, but also to libraries, airports providing wireless service and commercial Internet access providers.
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<br />It also applies to municipalities that provide Internet access to residents, be they rural towns or cities like Philadelphia and San Francisco, which have plans to build their own Net access networks.
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<br />So far, however, universities have been most vocal in their opposition.
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<br />The 1994 law, the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act, requires telephone carriers to engineer their switching systems at their own cost so that federal agents can obtain easy surveillance access.
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<br />Recognizing the growth of Internet-based telephone and other communications, the order requires that organizations like universities providing Internet access also comply with the law by spring 2007.
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<br />The Justice Department requested the order last year, saying that new technologies like telephone service over the Internet were endangering law enforcement's ability to conduct wiretaps "in their fight against criminals, terrorists and spies."
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<br />Justice Department officials, who declined to comment for this article, said in their written comments filed with the Federal Communications Commission that the new requirements were necessary to keep the 1994 law "viable in the face of the monumental shift of the telecommunications industry" and to enable law enforcement to "accomplish its mission in the face of rapidly advancing technology."
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<br />The F.C.C. says it is considering whether to exempt educational institutions from some of the law's provisions, but it has not granted an extension for compliance.
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<br />Lawyers for the American Council on Education, the nation's largest association of universities and colleges, are preparing to appeal the order before the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, Terry W. Hartle, a senior vice president of the council, said Friday.
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<br />The Center for Democracy and Technology, a nonprofit civil liberties group, has enlisted plaintiffs for a separate legal challenge, focusing on objections to government control over how organizations, including hundreds of private technology companies, design Internet systems, James X. Dempsey, the center's executive director, said Friday.
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<br />The universities do not question the government's right to use wiretaps to monitor terrorism or criminal suspects on college campuses, Mr. Hartle said, only the order's rapid timetable for compliance and extraordinary cost.
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<br />Technology experts retained by the schools estimated that it could cost universities at least $7 billion just to buy the Internet switches and routers necessary for compliance. That figure does not include installation or the costs of hiring and training staff to oversee the sophisticated circuitry around the clock, as the law requires, the experts said.
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<br />"This is the mother of all unfunded mandates," Mr. Hartle said.
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<br />Even the lowest estimates of compliance costs would, on average, increase annual tuition at most American universities by some $450, at a time when rising education costs are already a sore point with parents and members of Congress, Mr. Hartle said.
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<br />At New York University, for instance, the order would require the installation of thousands of new devices in more than 100 buildings around Manhattan, be they small switches in a wiring closet or large aggregation routers that pull data together from many sites and send it over the Internet, said Doug Carlson, the university's executive director of communications and computing services.
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<br />"Back of the envelope, this would cost us many millions of dollars," Mr. Carlson said.
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<br />F.C.C. officials declined to comment publicly, citing their continuing review of possible exemptions to the order.
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</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/10/colleges-protest-call-to-upgrade.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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KAY BAILEY HUTCHINSON SAYS LYING UNDER OATH WOULD BE A "PERJURY TECHNICALITY"

by codewarrior.wins In reply to CodeWarriorz Thoughts

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<a href="http://thinkprogress.org/2005/10/23/hutchinson-technicality/">http://thinkprogress.org/2005/10/23/hutchinson-technicality/</a>
<br />Hutchinson: Indictments Should Be ?On a Crime and Not Some Perjury Technicality?
<br />On Meet the Press, Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchinson picks up where Bill Kristol left off:
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<br />I certainly hope that if there is going to be an indictment that says something happened, that it is an indictment on a crime and not some perjury technicality where they couldn?t indict on the crime so they go to something just to show that their two years of investigation were not a waste of time and dollars.
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<br />Perjury is just a little technicality punishable by up to five years in prison.
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</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://codewarriorz.blogspot.com/2005/10/kay-bailey-hutchinson-says-lying-under.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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