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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--2/17/00

By ebott ·
I?m looking for your suggestions on the most cost-effective ways to upgrade an entire office to Windows 2000. Microsoft?s price list is terribly confusing, with all its upgrade and licensing options. Assuming you aren?t part of Microsoft?s Select program, what?s the best way to upgrade 10, 20, or more PCs to Windows 2000?

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--2/17/00

by gktod In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

In looking at cost-efectiveness, make sure not only to look at the software or licencing options, but also how much is it going to cost in time and manpower.
As far as the software goes, I would recommend purchasing Windows 2000 Server. The Advanced Server is a nice option as far as clustering etc goes, but under 50 pcs and its not really worth the extra cost for the extra utils you going to get.
For your workstations, well the Professional 2000 upgrade pack is obvious. Now as far as licencing goes, I would recommend selecting a per server option, against Microsoft's recommendation, but in a realativley small network, you not going to find many servers, so its definatley the path I would choose. As soon as you start going over 40 users, or 3 servers, per seat would be the selected option.
As far as deploying it goes, well Windows 2000 now comes with all those simple ways of creating answer files and UDF's which will make you deployment quick and easy. Incorporate some MSI files for any additional apps

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--2/17/00

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--2/17/00

by Ed@Intellicore In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The only answer here is, "it depends"

An 'entire office' may consist of 10 workstations and no servers, it may consist of 20 workstations and one server, it may even be 50 or more workstations adn multiple servers. The workstations and servers inquestion, may or may not meet hardware reommendations, may or may not be in a well managed environment, may or may not be a mixed environment.

I must assume from the context of your question, that you are not considering hardware, or the additional cost of migrating from a mixed environment, but rather are only considering licensing.

Therefore my answer is as follows:

10 user upgrade without server
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
1 Windows 2000 Professional Product upgrade
9 Windows 2000 Professional Upgrade licenses
(2 points per license, 18 total, 10 points to qualify for Microsoft Open License Level A)
See details at http://www.microsoft.com/enterprise/licensing/Open.htm#overview2

20 user upgrade without server
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--2/17/00

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--2/17/00

by Ed@Intellicore In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The only answer here is, "it depends"

An 'entire office' may consist of 10 workstations and no servers, it may consist of 20 workstations and one server, it may even be 50 or more workstations adn multiple servers. The workstations and servers inquestion, may or may not meet hardware reommendations, may or may not be in a well managed environment, may or may not be a mixed environment.

I must assume from the context of your question, that you are not considering hardware, or the additional cost of migrating from a mixed environment, but rather are only considering licensing.

Therefore my answer is as follows:

10 user upgrade without server
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
1 Windows 2000 Professional Product upgrade
9 Windows 2000 Professional Upgrade licenses
(2 points per license, 18 total, 10 points to qualify for Microsoft Open License Level A)
See details at http://www.microsoft.com/enterprise/licensing/Open.htm#overview2

20 user upgrade without server
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--2/17/00

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--2/17/00

by Inspectorclave In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

Assuming, of course, that the server is setup for "per seat" licensing (every workstation requires a separate license) then the most cost effective way would be to purchase bulk CAL's (Client Access Licenses). If you have, for example, 40 workstations, but only 20 will be logged into the server(s) at any one given time, then it is much more cost effective to purchase on the CAL's for those computers that will be logged in to the server. This can be accomplished through "per server" licenesing. If you have configured the servers for per seat licensing, don't fear! Microsoft allows you to convert from per seat to per server (or vise versa) one time per installation.

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--2/17/00

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--2/17/00

by rlfoster In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

I would use the MOLP. Buy 1 cd, 1 doc kit and as many licenses as you need.

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--2/17/00

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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