Windows

Our forums are currently in maintenance mode and the ability to post is disabled. We will be back up and running as soon as possible. Thanks for your patience!

General discussion

Locked

Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--4/27/2000

By ebott ·
A reader tells me he's ready to ditch his 6GB IDE drive in favor of a screaming 18GB SCSI drive. But he doesn't want to go through the hassle of reinstalling Windows 2000 and all his software and customizations. What's the best way to move everything from his old drive to his new one so he can resume working without missing a beat? If a third-party utility is the answer, make sure it's compatible with Windows 2000.

This conversation is currently closed to new comments.

Thread display: Collapse - | Expand +

All Comments

Collapse -

Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--4/27/2000

by clarenceclaw In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

I would jumper the new drive to be
drive #2, format it with (format/s), run
fdisk. Then copy the folders as required.
useing drag and drop. Then jumper it back
to being drive #1.
Remove the old drive. Better yet jumper it to be drive #2 andit for storage.

Collapse -

Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--4/27/2000

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

Collapse -

Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--4/27/2000

by techytype In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

Others have already stated use DriveImage by Powerquest, or Norton Ghost, to create an image of the hard drive. Restore it on the new drive. Make necessary adjustments to the partition size AFTER you have restored it and successfully rebooted it. I find some restores **** up if I try to change the partition size at the same time as the restore process. Then use PartitionMagic 5.0 (also by PowerQuest) to resize the partition to fill up the new drive. No, I do not hold stock in PowerQuest butthey do make some time saving and wonderful products!

Collapse -

Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--4/27/2000

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

Collapse -

Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--4/27/2000

by csiverts In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

Slave the old drive off of the new drive and use a program such as Norton Ghost, Quantum's Ontrack Disk Manager or Western Digital's Data Lifeguard Tools to do a sector by sector transfer of the old drive to the new one. At least that's what I would do. :)

Collapse -

Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--4/27/2000

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

Collapse -

Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--4/27/2000

There is probably many ways to accomplish this task... the fastest with good data intregity would be the following:

1. Get SYSPREP.EXE from the Support/Tools/Deploy.cab folder on the Win 2000 Pro CD.
2. Run SYSPREP on the source disk with the following options:
SYSPREP.EXE -nosidgen -pnp
This prepares the system to be imaged so that it does not create a new SID when restarted, and forces a Plug and Play routine for older devices that may not be PNP. (Sysprep causes a mini setup like first boot by default and catches new PNP devices, but may not catch older devices and we dont know from the desc if the new SCSI controller is truly Win 2000 PNP or not.)
3. When Sysprep finishes, it shuts the system down. Take the downed system, and put in the new SCSI hardware, and boot from a floppy created from Powerquest Drive Image 3.0.
4. Image the drive from the source IDE to the new SCSI utilizing the above program.
5. Remove the IDE drive from the system and boot to the new drive.
6. The Sysprep

Collapse -

Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--4/27/2000

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

Collapse -

Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--4/27/2000

by gtait In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

If he is using server 2000 then he can install the new scsi drive, upgrade both hard drives to dynamic disks, partition off 6 GBs, then create the mirror set. Reboot if necessary. Break mirror. change the boot.ini, if scsi bios disabled, reboot, keep a boot disk with the original boot.ini, just in case. That should be it. I would keep the old drive for storage, or even a backup. Don't throw away the old boot disk!

Collapse -

Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--4/27/2000

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

Related Discussions

Related Forums