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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--7/13/2000

By ebott ·
Over the past few months, I've been soliciting your help replacing pieces of Windows that, for one reason or another, aren't up to the demands of power users. This week, the target is the Windows Registry Editor. For some reason, Microsoft ships twoof them with Windows 2000, Regedit and Regedt32. Either one gets the job done, but both run out of gas quickly--for example, you can't do search-and-replace operations, nor can you undo changes. Surely there's a better way. If you've got a favorite Regedit replacement, tell me (and your fellow TechRepublic members) about it. Be sure to include the key features that make your alternative better than the default, and don't forget to provide a Web link for more information.

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--7/13/2000

by cagandhi In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

As per my experience the registry tool is just great!!!, excilent, suprab.
I like that tool most.
to get the tool go to
www.registrytool.com.
it is not only giving u friendly handy tool to edit registry, but it also teach u , that how the registry created & works in the windows.
everything about registry of win '95, '98 & NT.
In short : "Registry Tool is a total system providing not only the tools necessary to maintain the Windows Registry, but most importantly the manual combined with the Tips and Notes feature provides you with critical knowledge about the Windows Registry. End flying blind, get the capacity, reliability, and power of Registry Tool."
just one line is enough: "go get it & just do it now"

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--7/13/2000

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--7/13/2000

by pschmied In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

You wrote "For some reason, Microsoft ships two of them with Windows 2000, Regedit and Regedt32"

First, these two have been in every version of Windows since Windows 3X with a registry.

The best replacement would depend on the person doing the editing and his environment. If you don't know why there are two different standard bundled tools, you probably shouldn't be messing directly with the registry.
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The ultimate goal is normally not to edit the registry. Registry editing on a single stand-alone machine is an exercize that doesn't require much of a tool. This is an activity that doesn't occur in isolation, so rather than just a direct replacement, I think in terms of a collection of tools.

Specialized tools are better than a "swiss army knife" approach. I'd rather spend $50 on basic Kmart tools, than get one of those $50 Leatherman combitools. Basic, simple, reliable and cost effective are the hallmarks of a good tool.

==========
If you are an ITpro, and have to mod

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--7/13/2000

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--7/13/2000

by steveh In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

My favorite registry editor tool comes with the Windows NT Resource Kit. Reg.exe allow an administrator to execute any of several commands like Query, Add, Update, Delete, Copy, Save, Backup, Restore, Load, and Unload, on both local and remote PC's. My best example is when I created a batch file to add an environment variable to all computers on a WAN. It took a matter of minutes to add the variable to over 100 PCs, from the computer on my desk. Each of the commands are relatively easy to use, and all execute from a command prompt. There are also a couple other registry utilities available with the NT Resource Kit that offer many other features than either of the M$ Windows' editors.

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--7/13/2000

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--7/13/2000

by dave In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

My regedit replacement really isn't a replacement but an easier way to edit the registry. I simply export the registry to a .TXT file and use WordPad to find/edit/replace. Then I use regedit to import the edited registry. I used this when I wanted to remove a hard drive. I copied the drive to C: and mass changed references to to C:, then changed my CD references from E: to . Everything works but some old .ini files may n3ed editing too.
Dave Terry - dave@ddt3.com

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--7/13/2000

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--7/13/2000

by khughes In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

Seems kind of tinkertoy compared to some of
the other answers, but I always had good
luck with a prog named Registry Genie. It
is/was part of the Cleansweep package from
Quarterdeck. The product name has changed to
Norton Cleansweep since Symnatec aquired Quarterdeck some time ago.

http://www.symantec.com/sabu/qdeck/features.html

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--7/13/2000

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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