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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--8/10/00

By ebott ·
A network administrator passes along this puzzle. He's baffled, because he hasn't seen any improvement in performance on his five-user Windows 2000 network after increasing server RAM from 64MB to 128MB. That should be plenty of memory for such a small network, but he isn't seeing the performance gains he expected; in fact, his network seems to be running slower than before. How can this TechRepublic member figure out where his memory is being used up? Are Windows 2000's performance monitoring tools enough, or should he invest in third-party tools?

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--8/10/00

by Brian Lusk In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

I have to agree with all of the above suggestions. Particular items you want to watch in the Performance Monitor include the Paging File, # of Pages to it, etc.

You should also monitor network accesses (bytes in and bytes out) for several days.An additional idea is to use a network sniffer to watch for extreme amounts of network accesses in an idle state.

Personally, I would check to ensure the NIC card is working correctly with the latest drivers and that I had sufficient hard disk space to run with. Then, I would change the swap file parameters to force Windows to write a new one that reflects the added RAM. That is a usual culprit for performance hits after upgrades.

Good luck, and hope this helps the Administrator!

Brian Lusk
brianlusk@netzero.net

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--8/10/00

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--8/10/00

by bill.parks In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

How vague. What performance gains is he expecting??? Disk??? If so, change his Server properties from "Balance" to "Optimize for File Sharing." This will up his disk cache for file sharing. Authentication??? Name Resolution??? Use PerfMon to grab some basic counters:
Disk: - Log. Disk. - Avg. Disk Queue Length. (if consistenly high, upsize disk subsystem)
CPU: - System - %Total Processor Time. (if consistently >80 upgrade CPU)
System: - Server - Work Item Shortages. (if consistenly increasing, it means the server is failing requests, usually CPU or memory)
Memory: - Memory - Pages/Sec. and Paging File - % Usage. (if these two are always high, add memory). Create the Page file to be 2 times the physical RAM on Min and Max to prevent excessive fragmentation, and/or put it on another physical drive. There is no need to invest in 3rd party tools. NT's PerfMon is the API used for most of them anyway.

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--8/10/00

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--8/10/00

by techytype In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

All things remaining equal, assuming no changes are taking place such as new software etc. my comment is simply this. When was the last time the server hard drives were optimized? My newest personal favourite for NT or W2K is Diskeeper by Executive Software. The crown used to belong to Symantec's Speedisk for optimization (still does for 9x though)

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--8/10/00

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--8/10/00

by JVincent In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

Windows 2000 Performance Monitoring tools should suffice for checking memory-hogging applications. In particular, I would use Performance Monitor and Task Manager. Specifically, I would check the page file size and increase it in proportion to theincrease in RAM.

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--8/10/00

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--8/10/00

by jamiec In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

I agree with the 'how vague' statement, you first need to determine what this server's function is. It's quite possible that you have it overloaded with functions, like maybe it's the PDC, IIS, Exchange, and SQL server all rolled up into one! That might work for such a small network, but it would be better to split the functions off to different servers.

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--8/10/00

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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