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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--8/10/00

By ebott ·
A network administrator passes along this puzzle. He's baffled, because he hasn't seen any improvement in performance on his five-user Windows 2000 network after increasing server RAM from 64MB to 128MB. That should be plenty of memory for such a small network, but he isn't seeing the performance gains he expected; in fact, his network seems to be running slower than before. How can this TechRepublic member figure out where his memory is being used up? Are Windows 2000's performance monitoring tools enough, or should he invest in third-party tools?

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--8/10/00

by jshilling In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

Is the administrator using WINS on this server? And if so has he upgraded to Windows 2000 Service Pack 1? Windows 2000 has a known issue with WINS, in fact it loses approx. 1MB of RAM per minute in Windows 2000. If he is using WINS on this serverthen perhaps this is his problem, and he needs to apply SR1.

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--8/10/00

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--8/10/00

by joek83 In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

Alright, it is like this Bott Daddy, he should examine what programs are utilizing his RAM via the Windows Task Manager under the process tab. Perhaps the five peons on this network are partaking in an Quake 3 tournament game unbeknowst to the network admin....this would also explain way last quarters sales are way down. Lastly, he should check that he has the correct Ram bus speed such as his other Ram strip.

I surf therefore, I am.

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--8/10/00

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--8/10/00

by tony_giboney In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

Was the real problem lack of memory or somthing he is overlooking.

The problem is slowly getting worse so he may want to look a his disks fragmentation on his server and his workstations. He may want to check out Microsofts KB articles Q13539, Q227463, and Q223146. Also there is a mass of information on this subject in the form of white papers from NSTL on the highly recomended Diskeeper web site http://wwww.execsoft.com/whats-new/whitepaper.com

Also note that the version of Diskeeper that comes packaged in WIN2K has its limitations, (see MS KB Q223146), one of those are that It can't be ran as a user, can't be scheduled (so you cant run it in the off hours).

I have had good results with Diskeeper ver 5.0 for WIN2K, running it in the off hours on my servers and workstations, the improvments are noticed by all.

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--8/10/00

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--8/10/00

by gkleffner In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

Once again, the problem is too vague. Not enough details. If this Administrator would start Task Manager, and click on the Performance tab, it will indicate the amount of available memory and the peak Commit Charge. If there is very little availablememory and the peak is significantly greater than 128MB, it is still too low on memory. Then, click on the Processes tab and then the mem usage header. This will sort the processes by memory usage. It will be simple enough to determine where memory is being consumed. If it appears that there isn't enough memory, do not resort to increasing the size of the pagefile. This will only increase the bottleneck at the disk subsystem and will not improve performance. If this Windows 2000 server is the AD server, and it is running DNS, WINS, possibly DHCP, and applications, I would recommend installing NT 4.0 instead. Further problem determination could be done using Performance Monitor, but certainly there is no need for third-party tools.

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--8/10/00

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--8/10/00

by pVp In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

With so few facts to go on, the first item on the list is whether the paging file was increased in proportion to the RAM increase. If not, that alone will drop performance like a rock.

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--8/10/00

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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