General discussion

Locked

Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--May 4, 20

By ebott ·
According to Microsoft, you should never use an administrative account for everyday use, especially if you're connected to the Internet. But that causes big headaches for power users who want to install new applications. In fact, many install programs simply won't run unless you have administrative rights. What sort of best practices should Windows 2000 Professional users follow when installing new software? Do I always have to be logged on as Administrator? Help me put together some do's and don'ts for third-party programs.

This conversation is currently closed to new comments.

Thread display: Collapse - | Expand +

All Comments

Collapse -

Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--May 4, 20

by JOHN_WESTWORTH In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

Is it me or have most people missed the point ? I thought that if you used group policy to assign or publish and application you didn't need administrator priveledges on the workstation. The applications automatically got applied to either the computer or the user.

Collapse -

Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--May 4, 20

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

Collapse -

Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--May 4, 20

by kermit_imler In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

In addition to the Runas command, you can also use the SU utility that comes with the W2K Resource Kit. The advantage to using SU over Runas is this utility is also available with the NT 4.0 Resource Kit. So, if you are running a heterogenous environment of NT & W2K, the commands are identical (as well as Unix).

Collapse -

Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--May 4, 20

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

Collapse -

Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge--May 4, 20

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

This question was auto closed due to inactivity

Related Discussions

Related Forums