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Giant Mecha Robots

By GSG ·
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I've been seeing trailers for a new movie called "Pacific Rim", and all I could think of was Jay Garman's rant from 2008, "Why Giant Mecha Robots are Stupid".
http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/geekend/sci-fi-rant-why-giant-mecha-robots-are-stupid/1148

It's like they read his post and added every single thing he said was stupid, and voila! there's the movie.

I almost want to see this movie just so I can point out why Jay was right!

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ANOTHER mecha robots movie!

by aidemzo_adanac In reply to Giant Mecha Robots

Just when you thought it was safe to consider a mech robot movie!

Oddly, this one is called Atlamtic Rim! LOL

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2740710/

This director is well known for his famed movies, Bikini Spring Break and Underground LIzard People, which he also had acting roles in.

believe it or not, Pacifc Rim and Atlantic Rim, both about Meha robots (Atlantic Rim beingmuch more realistic as humans use giant robots to destroy alien attackers) are by different writers, directors and have a different cast.

Maybe they argued it our when they both had the same idea and decided that if they each did a coast it would be okay.

Nutters! This is what low cost digital cameras and small budgets do now, grossly enough I see the same thing in music now too.

Low quality recordings, poor engineering, compression and production of halfwit bands, resulting in some backyard knobs selling CD's next to creative and talented artists that pay through teh nose for their own quality products. It becomes such a jumble, kids don't know what to buy/download anymore and just stick to whatever rubbish the radio stations play, which are owned by the labels large and small, and decide what is going to be popular.

We don't control our own entertainment anymore. Kids don't have the choices or artistic freedoms we used to when choosing what they want to listen to anymore. Kids HAVE to listen to genres that their peers accept now, which is force fed to them by the big four.

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Why?

by dogknees In reply to ANOTHER mecha robots movi ...

Why exactly do kids HAVE to listen to what their peers accept? It's never been required before, what has changed?

I don't really get the "kids don't know what to buy/download anymore" statement either. You look at what's available, and choose what you like. Simple and the same as it's ever been. Why would you rely on radio stations to tell you what's out there or what you "should" like?

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Pressure from all angles

by aidemzo_adanac In reply to Why?

When I was a kid, it didn't matter what brand of jeans I wore. Nobody cared if I rooted for BlueJays instead of Expos or Canucks instead of Flames etc. Nobody cared if my notebooks were a trendy brand.

Trends must be adhered to, in North America anyway. Brands must be worn, if not you are an alien that nobody will allow into social groups.

Why? REAL class separation has finally hit North America and people are starting to create peer groups based on their parent's income level. If kids aren't in line with other peers, they are excluded, bullied and in some cases, put in hospital or found suicidal.

Brand marketing dominates North American society.

When it comes to music, it's no different. There are four major companies that own all labels, most major music stores, the production and video companies, even MTV. They decide who will be the next popular star and they literally flood the market with it, until kids find themselves following and expecting peers to follow also.

It's not like Europe where a headbanger can hang out with a pop follower. Here you are judged on what you wear, what you listen to, what products you use etc. It is completely dominated by brand marketing, even 'artists' here are a brand that is marketed, not an artist.

I don't rely on radio stations for anything. The only time I listen to the radio is to track scheduled airplay for someone I am managing or think they are ripping off the artist on.

I am simply aware of how music and brands are sold and how kids have no choice anymore but to follow along as individuality and independence is frowned upon by peer groups.

Whether you get it or not, does not mean it's not a reality, IN fact it's a reality that has many organizations, police, schools etc on alert seeking ways to stop it as children have lost their lives due to not fitting into a specific trend.

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Well

by dogknees In reply to Pressure from all angles

... maybe we should do something about it rather than accepting it. The costs of this attitude to others are pretty obvious and not something we should just ignore.

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Huh?

by CharlieSpencer In reply to ANOTHER mecha robots movi ...

"Low quality recordings, poor engineering, compression and production of halfwit bands, resulting in some backyard knobs selling CD's next to creative and talented artists that pay through teh nose for their own quality products."

So a garage band without access to top-end recording gear is by default 'halfwit'? Even the Beatles had to start someplace. Before 'Saving Private Ryan', Tom Hanks starred in 'Bosom Buddies'. Low quality recordings can still indicate a level of performing talent. "Blair Witch Project" was both a commercial and critical success after being created with the cheap cameras and small budgets you disdain. Contrarily, just because an artist has reached the point they have access to professional engineers and an production tools doesn't automatically mean they're talented. Geez, look at David Hasselhoff. Tell me Madonna's primary talent isn't self-promotion. And when did big budgets and high production values equate to a quality product? "Waterworld"? "Ishtar"? "Gigli"? "Dune"?

"... kids don't know what to buy/download anymore and just stick to whatever rubbish the radio stations play, ... We don't control our own entertainment anymore."

WE never controlled it. In fact, when WE were growing up, we had less access to a variety of entertainment options than kids do now. In the States, three TV networks and the local radio stations were the limit of our exposure. We bought what we heard on the radio 'Countdown' shows and what we saw on 'Bandstand' and 'Soul Train'. We were just as influenced by peer pressure then as today's kids are. But if anything, the Internet has made it easier to be exposed to different sources of entertainment. Give a free 'station' a couple of your favorites and let it return other artists across a spectrum of similarity that the user determines. No Casey Kasem or Ed Sullivan involved. Visually, we were limited to the tube and the local single- or double-screen theater. Now subscription content delivery services can provide entertainment from libraries with decades of programming for a few bucks a month.

"...whatever rubbish the radio stations play, which are owned by the labels large and small, ... which is force fed to them by the big four."

Geez, dude, pick a position. First you rant about poor production values in home grown recordings, then you attack the labels that provide that better ones. If you don't approve of kids recording in the garage, and you don't approve of them being produced by the big labels, how do you suggest they distribute their work? Should every single performance be streamed live from a multi-million dollar studio at a bandwidth that only a government surveillance agency could afford?

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So a garage band without access to top-end recording gear is by default 'ha

by aidemzo_adanac In reply to Huh?

"So a garage band without access to top-end recording gear is by default 'halfwit'?
No. Wasn't said.

Even the Beatles had to start someplace.
Yes, with reel to reel and garage demo's, but that was not released to the market, that's just how bands USED to gain interest and get a contract for proper production. They didn't make a tape in the basement and start selling it.

" Before 'Saving Private Ryan', Tom Hanks starred in 'Bosom Buddies'."
No relevance whatsoever, this isn't about people breaking out.

"Blair Witch Project" was both a commercial and critical success after being created with the cheap cameras and small budgets you disdain

Blair Witch project was NOT the low end, low budget film it was sold to audiences as. It was created by 5 college grads who started the uindependent, Haxan Films at Disney's Hollywood Studios. The whole part of being found footage from amateur filmmakers, was fabricated. Though very low budget it was a NEW medium of film making that was a success, they haven't been able to get a deal for any other projects since though.

Contrarily, just because an artist has reached the point they have access to professional engineers and an production tools doesn't automatically mean they're talented.

And I haven't said anything of the sort either. Labels and major productions completely control what people like, view and listen to today. Whether the consumer realizes it or not. How many times have you left the car with some ridiculous song in your head that you would never normally listen to?

WE never controlled it. In fact, when WE were growing up, we had less access to a variety of entertainment options than kids do now.

Perhaps in North America it has always had a big four influence but not where I grew up. I listened to Reggae and loved it, though never played on the radio. I listened to all kinds of Heavy Metal that was NEVER heard on the radio.
So how did I know about music that was not played on the radio?

I looked for it. I would spend hours in record stores, scouring new releases and listening to music others had collected, then decided for myself what I chose to listen to. Of course when I liked something and thought a friend would, I'd make a copy and share it, and vice versa.
We bought what we heard on the radio 'Countdown' shows and what we saw on 'Bandstand' and 'Soul Train'. We were just as influenced by peer pressure then as today's kids are.
FALSE:
I most definitely did not listen to the radio to find out what I should be listening to, it was far to narrow of a medium for my tastes. neither myself nor any of my friends were influenced by American Bandstand, Top of the Pops or any of that commercial grade crap designed by labels to sell records.

"Geez, dude, pick a position. First you rant about poor production values in home grown recordings, then you attack the labels that provide that better ones. If you don't approve of kids recording in the garage, and you don't approve of them being produced by the big labels, how do you suggest they distribute their work?

I never said for one second that I don't approve of kids recording in the garage, in fact some of the best bands in history began that way and still do. I also don't believe in the big four that dominate what kids listen to and buy these days, THEIR production quality, of the new breed of 'manufactured artists' is abysmal.

There are plenty of smaller labels (thousands for that matter) with production value, they have qualified and experienced engineers and they seek out and help indie bands get decent releases to market. Most are run by successful artists themselves who are seeking ways to bring talent to the airwaves and market without the scams of working with the big four.

"Should every single performance be streamed live from a multi-million dollar studio at a bandwidth that only a government surveillance agency could afford?

Nope, and never said as much, it was a result of your limited comprehension skills, only understanding a single market that you have been surrounded with. That's fair enough but not reason enough to fabricate such misguided conclusions.

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"Perhaps in North America..."

by CharlieSpencer In reply to Giant Mecha Robots

"Perhaps in North America it has always had a big four influence but not where I grew up."

I suspect this is a key aspect of our disagreement. I can't address non-American markets, but I don't see the entertainment tastes today being influenced by any different factors than they were when I was younger. It's the same old masters, they're just pulling new strings.

"So how did I know about music that was not played on the radio? I looked for it. I would spend hours in record stores, scouring new releases and listening to music others had collected, then decided for myself what I chose to listen to. Of course when I liked something and thought a friend would, I'd make a copy and share it, and vice versa."

How does this differ from what kids do today, other than the mechanism? You searched stores, they search the web. They listen to music others collect, just as you did (and why is it peer pressure when they do it?), but they do it via friend lists and 'station' recommendations. You made copies, they swap files. But they have much easier access to a much wider range of options than I did (or you, I suspect).

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I saw the title of this post...

by jck In reply to Giant Mecha Robots

And that song from South Park "Mecha Streisand!" came to mind.

lol

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