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By Ramon Padilla Jr. ·
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Why have a Desktop PC at all?

by Mr L In reply to Why have a Desktop PC at ...

<p>Ramon, </p>
<p>Thanks, that's exactly what I was looking for, and I'll be digging deeper.  I'll keep you posted as I dive into this.</p>

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Why have a Desktop PC at all?

by Ramon Padilla Jr. In reply to Why have a Desktop PC at ...

IT Makes Sense,<br />
     I'm afraid I no longer have access to my
business case.  :-(   However, business cases are always
organization specific and usually don't apply across companies. 
Just as Gartner numbers do not necessarily equate to numbers in your
own org.  I certainly would enjoy doing one again though as both
the hardware and software has changed (both in price and capability) in
the 3.5 years since I wrote the last one.  Now to find an
organization in Florida that is in search of a CIO/Director with a bold
vision that will let me do one for them ;-)<br />
<br />
Sorry I couldn't be more help,<br />
<br />
Ramon<br />

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Why have a Desktop PC at all?

by michael.green In reply to Why have a Desktop PC at ...

<p>Hi Ramon,</p>
<p>As The Fates would have it, the discussion you prompted with "Why have a PC at all?" was a very timely arrival as our local government IT governance committee is deliberating a change to our desktop deployment strategy from fat clients to thin clients. The Citrix thin client model has worked exceedingly well for us in the areas of remote access, for smaller departments without the resources for replacing PCs, and to distribute our PeopleSoft applications enterprise-wide.</p>
<p>I forwarded a copy of "Why have a PC at All?" to our governece committee leader and she asked 2 questions perhaps you can help me with. </p>
<p>1.  </p>

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Why have a Desktop PC at all?

by michael.green In reply to Why have a Desktop PC at ...

<p>Hi Ramon,</p>
<p>As The Fates would have it, the discussion you prompted with "Why have a PC at all?" was a very timely arrival as our local government IT governance committee is deliberating a change to our desktop deployment strategy from fat clients to thin clients. The Citrix thin client model has worked exceedingly well for us in the areas of remote access, for smaller departments without the resources for replacing PCs, and to distribute our PeopleSoft applications enterprise-wide.</p>
<p>I forwarded a copy of "Why have a PC at All?" to our governece committee leader and she asked 2 questions perhaps you can help me with. </p>
<p>1.  </p>Who

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Why have a Desktop PC at all?

by michael.green In reply to Why have a Desktop PC at ...

<p>Hi Ramon,</p>
<p>As The Fates would have it, the discussion you prompted with "Why have a PC at all?" was a very timely arrival as our local government IT governance committee is deliberating a change to our desktop deployment strategy from fat clients to thin clients. The Citrix thin client model has worked exceedingly well for us in the areas of remote access, for smaller departments without the resources for replacing PCs, and to distribute our PeopleSoft applications enterprise-wide.</p>
<p>I forwarded a copy of "Why have a PC at All?" to our governece committee leader and she asked 2 questions perhaps you can help me with. </p>
<p>1.  </p>Whois

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Why have a Desktop PC at all?

by michael.green In reply to Why have a Desktop PC at ...

<p>Hi Ramon,</p>
<p>As The Fates would have it, the discussion you prompted with "Why have a PC at all?" was a very timely arrival as our local government IT governance committee is deliberating a change to our desktop deployment strategy from fat clients to thin clients. The Citrix thin client model has worked exceedingly well for us in the areas of remote access, for smaller departments without the resources for replacing PCs, and to distribute our PeopleSoft applications enterprise-wide.</p>
<p>I forwarded a copy of "Why have a PC at All?" to our governece committee leader and she asked 2 questions perhaps you can help me with. </p>
<p>1.  </p>WhoisRamon

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Why have a Desktop PC at all?

by michael.green In reply to Why have a Desktop PC at ...

<p>Hi Ramon,</p>
<p>As The Fates would have it, the discussion you prompted with "Why have a PC at all?" was a very timely arrival as our local government IT governance committee is deliberating a change to our desktop deployment strategy from fat clients to thin clients. The Citrix thin client model has worked exceedingly well for us in the areas of remote access, for smaller departments without the resources for replacing PCs, and to distribute our PeopleSoft applications enterprise-wide.</p>
<p>I forwarded a copy of "Why have a PC at All?" to our governece committee leader and she asked 2 questions perhaps you can help me with. </p>
<p>1.  </p>WhoisRamonPadilla

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Why have a Desktop PC at all?

by lamparth In reply to Why have a Desktop PC at ...

<p class="MsoNormal"><font face="Times new roman" size="3">Affordable desktop recipe</font></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman"> <?xml:namespace prefix =" o" ns =" "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office"" /></font></font></p>
<h1><font face="Times new roman" size="3">Ingredients</font></h1>
<ul type="disc">
<li class="MsoNormal"><font face="Times new roman" size="3">Cheap Dell PC</font></li>
<li class="MsoNormal"><font face="Times new roman" size="3">Norton Ghost Corp Edition</font></li>
<li class="MsoNormal"><font face="Times new roman" size="3">Universal Image Utility</font></li>
<li class="MsoNormal"><font face="Times new roman" size="3">SUS or WUS</font></li>
<li class="MsoNormal"><font face="Times new roman" size="3">NAV</font></li>
<li class="MsoNormal"><font face="Times new roman" size="3">Books on Group Policy and Ghost</font></li></ul>
<p class="MsoNormal"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman"> </font></font></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><font face="Times new roman" size="3">First take a blank PC put all the software on it which 80% of your company uses, than make an image of it using Ghost and UIU/Sysprep. (UIU is a standard driver db, that allows you to use images on different PC Hardware). <span> </span>Push out the image whatever way you want PXE, Client Install, CD etc? Use Sysprep to have the system add itself to the domain.</font></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><font face="Times new roman" size="3">Push out NAV and other needed applications using MSI or Automated Installation Files. Use SUS and NAV to keep the machine patched and roaming profile to synchronize the local user data with the server for backup purposes.</font></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman"> </font></font></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><font face="Times new roman" size="3">Done?</font></p>
<p> </p>

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Why have a Desktop PC at all?

by dpenrod In reply to Why have a Desktop PC at ...

<p>In the last year I have implemented a Citrix environment at our company, and it is working well.  </p>
<p>I am the sole system administrator managing 100 desktops in 3 locations.   About 75 desktops at our corporate office.<br />My cost justification was to free up more of my time from help desk support to doing more systems admin and planning.  Also to eliminate the need for PC upgrades.  </p>
<p>I proposed the Citrix implementation when we decided to purchase a CRM package, that would have required the installation of a DB server at each of our 3 locations, and the Syncing of Databases between them.   Citrix allowed all desktops to be run on Citrix servers here,  using a single DB server for the CRM, eliminating the need for DB servers at our other 2 locations. </p>
<p>I purchased 3 dual processor servers to host the apps.  THeye are set up identically.  if any server fails,  the others keep running providing very high availability.    I ended up dedicating one server for testing,  as 2 servers seem to handle our needs fine.</p>
<p>We run the entire MS office suite,  CRM,  ERP, Outlook,  and a handful of other apps on the Citrix desktop.    Users run all their apps except autocad on the Citrix desktop,  we have removed the apps from their PC's, reducing desktop complexity and admin costs.   </p>
<p>Users love the fact that ALL of our apps are now web enabled via Citrix secure gateway.  They can access their apps from any web browser, at home or on the road.  </p>
<p>My users on slower desktops (P-350s)  indicated their apps run MUCH faster on the server desktop. </p>
<p>I can now roll out an application to all users in an hour by installing it on 2 servers instead of 100 desktops.  </p>
<p>Our fat client apps (CRM, ERP) required desktop hardware upgrades with each major update.  Now we dont have to upgrade PC's any longer.   And our network traffic has been greatly reduced, since all those desktops now only need about 24Kb bandwith to run the Citrix application,  instead of several hundred kb to query the DB servers.    Most of the network traffic is now between the citrix servers and the DB servers, which in network terms are close and fast to each other.  </p>
<p>We had some intial latency issues with our remote offices over the WAN,  this was due to some Citrix version and config issues, which once worked out seemed to disappear.    Our remote office users have had to adjust to slower print times,  print jobs taking a minute or two to print instead of being nearly instantaneous.  (as all printing is generate from the Corporate office citrix servers,  instead of their local desktops)  In server based computing implementation,  pay special attention to planning for your printing needs.</p>
<p>My users have trouble telling whether the app is running locally or via citrix,  they are identical.   This has caused problems on a few occasions.</p>
<p>I have used Ghost images before,  and it didnt work out as well for me as we have purchased PC's piecemeal over the years (weve never had the budget for wholesale standardization of desktops), and I never had enough desktops with the same software configuration to allow me to scale up the number of desktops per ghost image.   Now I have only a couple ghost images I can use for all Citrix client PCs,  as there is is only the OS and Citrix client on most desktops now. </p>
<p>The majority of my help desk calls were software issue related, and those have all but disappeared on the desktops since Citrix. </p>
<p>I have only 6-7 laptop users.   They use both Citrix and local applications when they are traveling.   Once internet data access becomes Ubiquitous, (like cell phones are today),  I hope to move my laptop users to Citrix only. </p>
<p>In reading the posts here,  ive found many of the cons to be wrong or mis-stated.  </p>
<p>Its probbably unusual for a company our size to move to Server based computing,  most of the time it seems to be large companies who use it,  their economies of scale provide greater benefits for the hugh number of desktops that are affected.   Many of the Fortune 500 are using Citrix.  I know locally that Nationwide insurance is using Citrix on about 450 servers to service 50,000 client machines all over the world.  </p>
<p>We were a long time Terminal service user for only 1 app.  Our ERP fat client app for remote offices.  I used to think of Citrix as Terminal services on Steroids,  just lots of extra bells and whistels that were nice,  but not necessary.  <br />In the past few years Citrix has changed into a complete Solution that goes way beyond simple terminal services.  </p>
<p>To summarize my experience,  server based computing,  especially the Citrix suite,  provides robust,  reliable,  secure, and manageable application access,  to anyone, anywhere, anytime.  And it does so with Lower TCO.  </p>

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Why have a Desktop PC at all?

by support In reply to Why have a Desktop PC at ...

<p>In 2004 - 2005 I instigated this type of configuration into a company using the Microsoft Terminal Server technology without a Citrix server, the results have been very positive and decreased the TCO extensively. The configuration has been in place now for almost 2 years and has been stable and secure.</p>
<p>It also has allowed users to remote access with ease (where granted), it has also decreased the administrative time needed to manage the network and brought desktop management to a central location thus easing the burden of managing desktops over a large geographical area. </p>
<p>Due to the success of this thin client architechure I am very much a supporter of this form of configuration, the only downside to this form of networking is the loneliness expierence due to the deacrease in administrative staff. </p>
<p>Through effective policies and frontline security measures the network has not to date been effected by an external threat either viruses or spyware .</p>
<p>Also with a storeroom full of once obsolete PC's we can now re-commission these units to become active nodes on the network. (dumb terminals) </p>

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