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Grammatical quibble

By mjmarcus ·
Just a little pet peeve of mine is use of the word "comprise", which means to contain, encompassed, or be composed of. Most people interchange "comprise" with "compose" when they are actually opposites.
In "Personal Success", you say: "had an input-output system comprised of only switches and blinking lights". This is an incorrect usage - you could say "composed of only switches and blinking lights" or you could say "comprising only switches and blinking lights".
Bad trivia geek!

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You forgot

by jdclyde In reply to It was me!!!!!!!!!!!

the nervious laughter often associated with one in a padded room with the long sleaved jacket stapped on.

There coming to take me away ha ha
there coming to take me away ho ho
to the funny farm....

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I know that multiple exclamation marks are the sign of a deranged mind

by neilb@uk In reply to It was me!!!!!!!!!!!

but nineteen is just bragging!

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Which explains how it is that ...

by deepsand In reply to I know that multiple excl ...

you recognized her.

I'd have thought that by now you would have learned not to publicly tattle on yourself.

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Are you sure that that was his face?

by deepsand In reply to Not nice?

It looked like it may have been spanked a bit.

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Lol

by Jellimonsta In reply to Their are all kind of mis ...

Too funny Max! :) You are beginning to fit right in with the rest of us!

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Dont yew mean

by Montgomery Gator In reply to Their are all kind of mis ...

"...Its good too notice it eye guess, but I wooden git..."
:-)

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Per Merriam-Webster, usage in article is NOT incorrect.

by deepsand In reply to Grammatical quibble

In fact, M-W is puzzled as to why so many think it so.

See definition below.
==================================================

Main Entry: com?prise
Pronunciation: k&m-'prIz
Function: transitive verb
Inflected Form(s): com?prised; com?pris?ing
Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French compris, past participle of comprendre, from Latin comprehendere
1 : to include especially within a particular scope <civilization as Lenin used the term would then certainly have comprised the changes that are now associated in our minds with "developed" rather than "developing" states -- Times Literary Supplement>
2 : to be made up of <a vast installation, comprising fifty buildings -- Jane Jacobs>
3 : COMPOSE, CONSTITUTE <a misconception as to what comprises a literary generation -- William Styron> <about 8 percent of our military forces are comprised of women -- Jimmy Carter>
usage Although it has been in use since the late 18th century, sense 3 is still attacked as wrong. Why it has been singled out is not clear, but until comparatively recent times it was found chiefly in scientific or technical writing rather than belles lettres. Our current evidence shows a slight shift in usage: sense 3 is somewhat more frequent in recent literary use than the earlier senses. You should be aware, however, that if you use sense 3 you may be subject to criticism for doing so, and you may want to choose a safer synonym such as compose or make up.

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And this is important why?

by Why Me Worry? In reply to Grammatical quibble

What a waste of a thread if you ask me. How is this even IT related or has anything remotely to do with IT?

If we needed English lessons, we would get "Hooked on Phonics"


mama mia...what a shenanigan this is turning into

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first of all

by ITgirli In reply to And this is important why ...

It is in the Misc. category.
Second of all, if you don't like it, don't post.
Third of all that is the incorrect usage of shenanigan.

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Lol

by Jellimonsta In reply to first of all

You stinker IT! :)

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