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SPYWARE: Say It Isn't So, Uncle Bill!

by Frenchwood In reply to SPYWARE: Say It Isn't So, ...

<h5>Billy Boy does it again!</h5>
<p>What next? Ignoring Viruses?</p>
<p>M</p>

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SPYWARE: Say It Isn't So, Uncle Bill

by dmcmahon In reply to SPYWARE: Say It Isn't So, ...

<p><strong>There is no gray area for me or my clients when it comes to SAM (Spyware, Adware, Malware). I take a routine hard line by choosing to delete every little thing MS Antispyware Beta finds. The same applies to the two additional backup scanners I recommend: PepiMK's Spybot Search & Destroy and Lavasoft's Adaware. I call them the "Trinity" of spyware scanners!</strong></p>
<p><strong>I will reverse my MS Antispyware endorsement to clients ONLY if it stops "flaging" claria products (notice I do not capitalize brand corporate names that offer sneaky death & destruction products). Maybe in the future i'll be spelling Microsoft all lower case! Good work on noticing the "trend" anyway!</strong></p>

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SPYWARE: Say It Isn't So, Uncle Bill

by lachandler2000 In reply to SPYWARE: Say It Isn't So, ...

<p>Do You think maybe they are going to rid spyware from the inside-out?</p>
<p>What better way is there to beat them than to join them and use those same people working for Claria to aid Microsoft.  Personally, I'm tired of all this bickering about, "What are we going to do?".  While millions are being siphoned from our pockets in more than just stolen privacy and defense, someone is going to jump in and start the real fight.  Why would anyone think Bill Gates wants to spy on them?  Sure Windows (any version) has vulnerabilities, so does the rest of them.  I'm tired of having to fortify my protection just to get on the internet for the slightest reason.  I'm really tired of having to fix computers that are loaded down with invasive software that lugs down even the fastest computer.  I don't think Microsoft is as bad as many proclaim and I sure don't believe they are looking for spyware avenues.  Think!  It would be too easy to build that into windows.  Let's buy all these sites and turn them to our weapon for privacy.</p>

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SPYWARE: Say It Isn't So, Uncle Bill!

by HutchTech In reply to HutchTech Blog

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">When I first read reports that Microsoft was planning on purchasing spyware/privacy-invader Claria (formerly Gain) I assumed that it was a hoax. Now it look as if that may have been so much wishful thinking. Whether or not Uncle Bill ever buys Claria, it does seem as if someone is cozying up to the purveyors of anti-privacy programs and downgrading how Microsoft's own AntiSpyware Beta views these badies.<br />
<br />Take a look, if you dare, at the eWeek article yourself with the link below.<br />
<br />- Hutch<br />
<br />
<a href="http://www.eweek.com/print_article2/0,2533,a=155360,00.asp">Microsoft Downgrades Claria Adware Detections</a>
</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://hutchtech.blogspot.com/2005/07/spyware-say-it-isnt-so-uncle-bill.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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BLOG: Freedom, Blogging, and the Constitution - EFF

by HutchTech In reply to HutchTech Blog

<div xmlns="a">http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><a href="img">http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/1242/149/1600/liberty_waits.jpg"><img alt="" src="http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/1242/149/400/liberty_waits.jpg" border="0" /> </a><br />If you blog, or for that matter, surf the Internet-web-thingy, you need to check out the link below and look at the information the Electronic Freedom Foundation (<a href="http://www.eff.org">www.eff.org</a&gt has put together for you. While I don't think there's any way for you to justify spending hours on the company payroll posting your daily dietary choices, there are some legal issues of which you should be aware.<br /><br />Now, if you're not blogging (and shame on you if you're not), at least look at how you can protect your privacy while surfing--for free. That's right, the EFF has put together cross-platform options using Privoxy and TOR to help you surf anonymously. Now, let me say right off the bat that if you're using 802.11b down at the coffee shop, as I am right now, then you'll definitely notice a decrease in speed. However, if you're also looking at doing research (or anything, for that matter) that you want to remain anonymous, then you need to use TOR. Check it out at <a href="http://tor.eff.org">tor.eff.org</a>.<br /><br />- Hutch<br /><br /><a href="http://www.eff.org/bloggers/">EFF: Bloggers</a> </div>
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<div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://hutchtech.blogspot.com/2005/07/blog-freedom-blogging-and-constitution.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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UPGRADES: Wasteful or Needful? - CNET

by HutchTech In reply to HutchTech Blog

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">Whether we'll admit it or not, all of us have probably made the "silly" upgrade at some point. You know, the $1000 racing tires for the Geo Metro; the time you actually used the mini-bar when the store was right next door; buying a PowerPC Macintosh in the last half of 2005. <br /><br />As someone enamored with technology, I find it difficult to resist the temptation not to upgrade constantly, but experience (and a real-world budget) can often keep one from the sophomoric mistakes of the past. Either way, take a look at some of the upgrades you may not need to make if you'll really think about them. Rafe Needleman has written an excellent article at the link below. <br /><br />- Hutch <br /><br /><a href="http://reviews.cnet.com/4520-3000_7-6258621.html?tag=nl.e501">Works for Me: Silly upgrades - CNET reviews</a> </div>
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<div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://hutchtech.blogspot.com/2005/07/upgrades-wasteful-or-needful-cnet.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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MOBILE PHONES: Call Me When You're Ready for Prime Time

by HutchTech In reply to HutchTech Blog

<div xmlns="em><strong>WARNING:">http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><em><strong>WARNING: The following rant will be incomprehensible and offensive to U.S.-based cell phone company management. Read at your own risk</strong>.</em> <br /><br />I won't be purchasing a new cell phone anytime soon. No, it's not the finances, the coverage, or selection of vendors, content, or options. I've got all of these and then some. No, I refuse to purchase any technology that's obsolete before I even get it out of the box. I'm not exaggerating here. Let me explain...<br /><br />The real issue is standardization. Think about it. When you buy a digital camera to use with your computer, you expect the camera manufacturer to make it's product compatible with your system, and allow you to edit the pictures you take with your choice of software in a non-proprietary format. If you want to use it with a laptop or desktop doesn't matter. If you want to take it overseas, fine. If you move to a region where that company doesn't have a support center, no problem. You also don't expect them to lock down any features that make it difficult, if not impossible for you to use other pieces of hardware with your camera. Competition and free market forces have pushed innovation forward and digital camera prices down.<br /><br />The phone companies have actually stifled innovation with their proprietary formats, disabling/damaging of promising technology (REA Bluetooth) and locking various models of phones to their network alone. Consumers don't drive cell phone innovation, phone companies drive the phone manufacturers. Phone companies are afraid of competition and want to hook you into their long-term plans by having a lock on that new, cool model with it's short-term technology you just can't live without--at least until next week, when the next model shows up.<br /><br />I'm sick of the lack of standardization, inability to choose the phone you want, and lagging behind Europe and Asia when it comes to our cell phone market. Besides, more of the optional uses I have for a cell phone are being overtaken by laptops, music/media devices, and other portable technology. If I ever get ubiquitous WiFi and Skype on handheld, I could kiss my cell phone goodbye. So, <em>[insert cell company name here]</em>, when you're ready to actually let me, the consumer, call the shots, gimme a call.<br /><br />- Hutch</div>
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<div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://hutchtech.blogspot.com/2005/07/mobile-phones-call-me-when-youre-ready.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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EXPOS?: SoloGig.com--Fraud and Deception Find Work

by HutchTech In reply to HutchTech Blog

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">There are a million sordid tales in the wired city. This is one of them.<br /><br />With the new tech bubble about to expand, I've recently had reason to revamp the ol' r?sum? and begin looking at various job boards and other online job search tools. While I wish I had better news to report, here's the basic lowdown: these online tools are still far behind the technology curve. However, that review will have to wait for another day. Today I need to expose the fraudulent practices of one SoloGig.com.<br /><br />SoloGig bills itself as an online repository of tech jobs for the freelance technology professional, but it is actually an insidious way of getting your hard earned cash out of your wallet and into SoloGig's pocket. First off, who's behind SoloGig.com? Well, believe it or not, it's non other than CareerBuilder.com. My local paper uses CareerBuilder as its sole online source for displaying job-related classifieds, and I have been very pleased with CareerBuilder's content and services. But free is only nice if it actually delivers, and CareerBuilder has seemed to do that for me. Imagine, then, my surprise as I find out that they're the ones foisting SoloGig's fraud upon unsuspecting tech pros.<br /><br />I was looking for some solo gigs and therefore thought SoloGig.com would be a great fit. I signed up and paid for the premium service--yes, paid cold, hard cash. While no one can promise you job listings down the street, or even in your own hometown, I expected to find something in the greater Southern Puget Sound region, and was sorely disappointed. Instead, what I noted was that few, if any, of the listings on SoloGig were actually freelance or contract jobs. Most were retreads of online jobs I'd seen elsewhere, and most of these were pretty old to boot. But as I took a look at these listings, and asked the engine to sort them by their posting date, I noted another anomaly: postings were supposedly taking place mere tenths of a second apart. This was true not just of one or two individual postings, but entire web pages full of listings. How was it possible that job listings I'd seen over a week or two ago elsewhere were supposedly fresh leads posted mere moments before on SoloGig? My contention, and one that was never denied in my correspondence with SoloGig.com, was that someone (or more properly a SQL script of some kind) was <em>freshening</em> the listings to make it look like SoloGig had all kinds of new postings.<br /><br />Because SoloGig is owned by CareerBuilder, I found it odd that they would lag so far behind them in re-posting this data if they were simply sharing it. I decided it was time to Google SoloGig and see what complaints were out there (something I should have done in the beginning). Lo and behold, others had noticed similar issues, and most reported problems with billing and refunds. Well, eventually I had had enough of my time with SoloGig and asked for a refund. I was ready to duke it out with the billing department, but, to my great relief, my refund was posted within 24-hours of receiving my cancellation notice.<br /><br />While I never expected SoloGig to be responsible for getting me a job, I did expect them to be honest with their data--especially when you pay them to do so.<br /><br />Though my tale ends somewhat happily (after all I didn't lose my money), it is still a cautionary tale in the murky ways of the web.<br /><br />- Hutch<br /><br /><em>Remember to post your comments below. Please write if you've had similar experiences with SoloGig or other paid job search engines.</em> </div>
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<div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://hutchtech.blogspot.com/2005/07/expos-sologigcom-fraud-and-deception.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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EXPOS?: SoloGig.com--Fraud and Deception Find Work

by columbus9 In reply to EXPOS?: SoloGig.com--Frau ...

So you didn't get a gig, get over it!  I've been a member of Sologig.com for almost 3 years now and have completed dozens of projects from the contacts I made there.  I've also found their customer service department much more amicable than of others freelance sites.

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EXPOS?: SoloGig.com--Fraud and Deception Find Work

by HutchTech In reply to EXPOS?: SoloGig.com--Frau ...

<p>I think you missed the point.  There were no gigs to get--they were all reposted off of other sites and the company was duping it's members by LYING about how recently the jobs were posted.  I'm not disgruntled--they gave me my money back, but I sure wouldn't want anyone else to have the same experience I did.  If it worked for you great, but your point doesn't have anything to do with my post.</p>
<p>- Hutch</p>
<p>P.S. I happened to look at your account profile, columbus9@ and noticed that you've got no actual information there, no answers to Tech Q&A, and you've only joined in the last few days--do you work for sologig.com?</p>
<p>Does anyone else know who this person really is, or is this just a way to plant a comment on the site to somehow negate my post?  Hmmmmm....</p>

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