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In my own words...

By Justin Fielding ·
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Essential tools of the trade

by Justin Fielding In reply to In my own words...

I?m sure every systems administrator has their own set of
tools which they use daily and just couldn?t get by without.  I thought I would spend a little time to let
people know what I keep in my toolbox, the programs and utilities which I guess
most administrators in a Unix/Linux environment would find useful.<br />


<p>#1 <a href="http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/%7Esgtatham/putty/">Putty</a>
- The single most useful and most used tool in my box.  If I want to do anything on one of our
servers then I need putty, due to the lack of an SSH client in Windows of
course (and running a Linux desktop just isn?t practical).  It?s free and easy to use, what more can you
ask for!<br />
<br />
#2 <a href="http://winscp.net/eng/docs/introduction">WinSCP</a>
- Again this one is a must, it makes transferring files to and from a Unix/Linux
server a doodle.  The clutter is minimal,
you want to get the files, edit them and put them back.  Norton Commander or Explorer-like interfaces
can be chosen from, drag and drop really saves some time.</p>


<p>#3 <a href="http://www.ultraedit.com/index.php">UltraEdit-32</a>
- The best text editor I have used to date. 
Throw away notepad, this will allow you to work with unix line
terminators, highlight code syntax and it automatically creates a .bak file
once you save changes (can be handy).<br />
<br />
These are my top three tools, all in constant use!</p>

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Essential tools of the trade

by dmarston In reply to Essential tools of the tr ...

<p>You can keep UltraEdit, I use Crimson Editor.. all the way.</p>
<p>It can fit on a floppy disk, do much of the same as UE and.....</p>
<p>it's FREEEEEEEEE !!!!!! </p>
<p><a href="http://www.crimsoneditor.com/">http://www.crimsoneditor.com/</a></p>
<p> </p>

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Essential tools of the trade

by apotheon In reply to Essential tools of the tr ...

<div style="text-align: justify">
<p>PuTTY? I don't bother. I use this nifty thing called "OpenSSH",
which runs on my work laptop natively. See, I'm running Linux for my
"desktop" system (Thinkpad + LCD monitor + spring switch keyboard +
optical mouse with scroll wheel + speakers + docking station makes me
happy), and it's entirely practical. In fact, I get a helluva lot more
done with my Linux system than I ever did with a Windows desktop
system. I guess if you're "forced" to use Windows, though, PuTTY is a
tolerable way to pretend you're using a unixy OS.</p>
<p>Here's my list:</p>
<ol>
<li style="border-bottom: thin dotted black">aterm: It's hard to beat a terminal emulator
lighter-weight than xterm with scrollwheel-compatible scrollbars
(unlike xterm's) and pseudo-transparency.</li>
<li style="border-bottom: thin dotted black">bash: Who needs graphical file browsers? They're not even (fully) scriptable!</li>
<li style="border-bottom: thin dotted black">apt: This is a serious system administrator's dream. Thank goodness for fast and easy software management.</li>
<li style="border-bottom: thin dotted black">vim: Little makes me happier than a lightweight
console-based text editor that is so friggin' powerful. You can have
your clicky crap. I'll take real power and flexibility any day.</li>
<li style="border-bottom: thin dotted black">ssh: I can manage most of the network from my desk.</li>
<li style="border-bottom: thin dotted black">Perl: It is the sysadmin scripting language to beat all others. 'nuff said.</li>
<li style="border-bottom: thin dotted black">scp: It's technically part of the OpenSSH toolset, but it deserves its own mention.</li>
<li style="border-bottom: thin dotted black">Ruby: Whereas Perl is the best sysadmin scripting
language, Ruby is the best object-oriented scripting language. Just try
to convince me otherwise.</li>
<li style="border-bottom: thin dotted black">alias: It's just a bash builtin, but it's so darned useful for commonly-used, long command line strings.</li>
<li style="border-bottom: thin dotted black">ln: Symlinks are my friend. All my admin scripts go in
~/src and I symlink to them from ~/bin so I can run them anywhere. This
also helps with simplifying command names without losing the ease of
reference to script types by file extension. For instance, I symlink
~/bin/fsckoff to ~/src/fsckoff.pl, ~/bin/sfn to ~/src/sfn.pl, and
~/bin/jarh to ~/src/japh/hack01.rb.</li>
<li style="border-bottom: thin dotted black">rdesktop: This is the unix client for Windows Terminal
Services, and allows access to the Windows application server from a
Linux system. Once in a great while, someone needs to use PowerPoint,
after all.</li>
<li style="border-bottom: thin dotted black">svn: Version control might save your *** some day.</li>
<li style="border-bottom: thin dotted black">Firefox: Even I need to use a graphical browser from time to time.</li>
<li style="border-bottom: thin dotted black">Abiword: Once in a while, I need to (shudder) translate to or from MS Word .doc format. Half the fat, twice the performance.</li>
</ol>
<p>I'm sure there are about a thousand more such things, but that's what comes to mind immediately.</p>
</div>

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Essential tools of the trade

by Justin Fielding In reply to Essential tools of the tr ...

I dissagree, Linux is great for servers but I dislike it on the desktop
(that's just not what it's good at, IMO).  Putty is not a way to
pretend you are on a Linux desktop, it's simply a tool to connect to
servers via SSH.<br />
<br />
I will say though that I will shortly be moving to a powerbook, the
power of BSD with a nice windows system on top.  How about the
best of both worlds? :)<br />

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Essential tools of the trade

by apotheon In reply to Essential tools of the tr ...

<div style="text-align: justify">
<p>Disagree all you like. I'm working in a place where the Linux desktops are the norm, and the Windows desktops are looked upon with distaste because of their limitations. The "best of both worlds" would be all the functionality of a purely unixy system with all the market penetration of Windows. MacOS X has neither.</p>
<p>That's not to say that MacOS X isn't a good OS. It's just more the "toy" OS, while systems like Linux and OpenBSD are for people that actually have serious work to do.</p>
<p>Ultimately, a workstation should be a server under the hood, anyway. This artificial separation of systems into server and client as some sort of inherent set of characteristics is doing people a disservice. The terms "server" and "client" describe transaction relationships, not capability. Ultimately, any workstation computer that isn't just a thin client should be a server as well: an application server with local client interface software, a network service server with network client software as well, and so on. Luckily, the various unices actually provide exactly that sort of architecture. Without sshd running on the workstations in this company, my job would be about 80% walking around to other people's desks, and where the few Windows systems are concerned I have to do just that. Without X Server running on the workstations in this company, I wouldn't be able to test new installs of GUI apps remotely on them or interfering with the work of the people actually using those workstations.</p>
<p>If the computer in question is just a game machine sitting around at home without any need to get any substantive work done in an enterprise network, you can get by with the severe limitations of a "client-only" OS. Otherwise, you need a server with client software for local use. The alternative is increased administrative overhead, decreased productivity, and nonexistent security architecture.</p>
</div>

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Essential tools of the trade

by broper In reply to Essential tools of the tr ...

Windows vs. Linux? Come along, fellas. Any good tech can make both work... together.<br />
<br />
Justin, you should investigate either Cygwin, which runs a *nux
simulation in windows and offers a pretty full CLI suite (including
ssh!) and it even includes a good X server. Or Windows Services for
Unix -- also free -- that hooks into the kernel and offers even more
genuine *nix functionality within windows.<br />
<br />
I've had a problem with WSU causing a weird problem with VMWare (screws
up USB detection somehow...), so I use Cygwin. It's really great.<br />

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It's virtual reality!

by Justin Fielding In reply to In my own words...

<p class="MsoNormal">A tool which I find absolutely vital when setting up or
testing any new system is <a href="http://www.vmware.com">VMware</a>.
 For those of you who have not used
VMware for systems testing or development, I suggest that you give it a
go.  While the GSX and ESX application
server platforms are powerful tools, we are interested in<a href="http://www.vmware.com"> VMware</a>
Workstation.  In a nutshell VM
Workstation allows you to run multiple virtual PC?s on your desktop, full networking
support is included allowing you to play through test scenarios quickly taking
snapshots before making major changes, allowing you to roll back without
re-installation.  You can also cone
machines, if you need to test interaction between two Windows XP machines,
simply install once, clone and then change the machine name / IP details.  Many more features exist and the best way to
discover them is to have a play with the 30-day evaluation.  You will probably notice later on that I test
most of my projects and new implementations in <a href="http://www.vmware.com">VMware</a>; realistically you need
to allow 1GB of RAM and ~30GB+ disk space, but with hardware being cheap these
days it?s well worth the expense.</p>

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It

by LukCAD In reply to It's virtual reality!

<p>Windows 2003(Windows XP) and Visual Studio 2005 ( IIS, MSSQL and ASP.NET inside). This is full kit if you would like to make the virtual reality into your computer. Why some people loves to make virtual problem for yourself by another products? I hate when computer overloaded by a lot of IDE and we spend a lot of time to find right version of project, right ide and right way how to transfer one format ide representation to another.  </p>
<p>Better look at her shoulders and listen her song from ABBA's days: really song and she are<em><a href="http://at.tut.by/lukcad/"> great</a></em>.</p>

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It's virtual reality!!!

by Justin Fielding In reply to In my own words...

<font><font class="qdesc">A tool which I find absolutely vital when setting up or
testing any new system is <a href="http://www.vmware.com/">VMware</a>.
 For those of you who have not used
VMware for systems testing or development, I suggest that you give it a
go.  While the GSX and ESX application
server platforms are powerful tools, we are interested in<a href="http://www.vmware.com/"> VMware</a>
Workstation.  In a nutshell VM
Workstation allows you to run multiple virtual PC?s on your desktop, full networking
support is included allowing you to play through test scenarios quickly taking
snapshots before making major changes, allowing you to roll back without
re-installation.  You can also cone
machines, if you need to test interaction between two Windows XP machines,
simply install once, clone and then change the machine name / IP details.  Many more features exist and the best way to
discover them is to have a play with the 30-day evaluation.  You will probably notice later on that I test
most of my projects and new implementations in <a href="http://www.vmware.com/">VMware</a>; realistically you need
to allow 1GB of RAM and around 30GB disk space, but with hardware being cheap these
days it?s well worth the expense.</font></font>

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It

by LukCAD In reply to It's virtual reality!!!

<p>Why so a lot of memory? It is real server. I tested the virtual reality by VS on 128Mb memory of computer with WXP one year ago. ;-)</p>
<p>Look at the power of IIS:</p>
<p><img alt="power of iis" src="http://lukcad.at.tut.by/iis.gif" /></p>

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