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Is this the beginning of the end for MS?

By TimMitchell ·
I can't help but think that Windows XP will be the catalyst that topples Microsoft from its industry-leading throne. After all, people are fed up with Microsoft! The Justice Dept. is all over them (and rightly so), and the battle has just begun inthe courts. And in the fat middle of that mess, Microsoft concocts a Communist-like product activation scheme which assumes guilt and makes each and every end user prove that he/she may legally be using the software that has already been bought andpaid for ($$$$).

Their last OS was released only 14 months ago, and office suites are appearing just as fast. Public opinion of Microsoft is at an all-time low. Even with their Product Activation scam, their products keep rising in price (Mr.Gates, are you doing that to keep prices down or to satisfy Wall Street?). They continue to promise that the NBT will be much better than the last, with more user-friendly features and workgroup collaberation (whatever that means); all of which is meaningless to me, considering that most of my end users can't send an email attachment without supervision.

Contrary to what many people think, there are alternatives out there. Although its hardware is proprietary, Macintosh makes a very stable, user-friendly product. Linux will run on almost any PC, and it's free. Sun has a free office suite that is well worth what you pay for it.... and Corel has an Office 2000-compatible suite that is as good or better than its Microsoft counterpart (at half the price, product activation not required).

I really think Microsoft has screwed up. Bill won't admit it; he has never backed down on a product release before and will bet the farm on this one, too. I just hope that those thousands ofprogrammers will find new jobs.....

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Little help from Jolly Roger

by dkurdin In reply to No Tech Savvy

No product will be popular if its not pushed hard enough. I think someone must be in charge and this is not the case with open source software. Yes I think Bill charges a little too much and some people, especially in some not so well-off countries,can not afford it. Thank God there are Robins in software forest. Who take from the rich and give to the poor. I can buy the latest and greatest from Bill for as much as 2$ per CD. Isn't great?
P.S. English is my second language don't flame me, you, american boys.

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Little help from Jolly Roger

by dkurdin In reply to No Tech Savvy

No product will be popular if its not pushed hard enough. I think someone must be in charge and this is not the case with open source software. Yes I think Bill charges a little too much and some people, especially in some not so well-off countries,can not afford it. Thank God there are Robins in software forest. Who take from the rich and give to the poor. I can buy the latest and greatest from Bill for as much as 2$ per CD. Isn't great?
P.S. English is my second language don't flame me, you, american boys.

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Little help from Jolly Roger

by dkurdin In reply to No Tech Savvy

No product will be popular if its not pushed hard enough. I think someone must be in charge and this is not the case with open source software. Yes I think Bill charges a little too much and some people, especially in some not so well-off countries,can not afford it. Thank God there are Robins in software forest. Who take from the rich and give to the poor. I can buy the latest and greatest from Bill for as much as 2$ per CD. Isn't great?
P.S. English is my second language don't flame me, you, american boys.

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Microsoft may not be out of it

by ghall In reply to Is this the beginning of ...

One thing to consider, how long will people wait out Microsoft if a new popular software program comes out, particularly one that is not compatible with all the old versions of windows? I personally know quite a few people who would upgrade windows, if only to be able to use the newest and latest version of some beloved program. Look at the past record with software like Photoshop and other programs. So, what happens when the new software no longer supports windows 95/98 or 2000? If they want to use the updated versions, they will be forced to upgrade to Windows XP! I for one, will not be one of those people though.

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supporting legacy software

by amedee In reply to Microsoft may not be out ...

And what when it goes the other way around?
Should I support end users that use our software, and have switched to XP? Even though our software is not certified for XP? Some of our software is mission-critical, suppose it ceases functioning on XP, what then?

Btw I work for a small software company (<50 employees of which <10 software programmers) so keeping up with M$ is not so easy.

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The out cry

by AndrewSBM In reply to supporting legacy softwar ...

If you remember back to when win95 was released most IT people thought it was a joke and there were stories of warehouses full of win95 product that just was not moving. As you have seen it did move with time and I think the same will happen here. There is/will be a huge out cry of big bad bill fighting for that last dollar in your pocket to fix that continual lighting problem within his dream home of the future, but in the end everyone will move to XP and beyond. There are to many end users out there that like it and to be honest that is who bill is targeting he knows that?s where the future is with mobile workers, internet, home users.

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Micro$oft indeed...

by Addam Moody In reply to The out cry

I must admit, between the already much-hated winXP, and the appaling new licensing issues, it makes me wonder when Mr. Gates' head is going to be on the $100 bills.

Microsoft's apparent policy on what can only be described as "Forced" software upgrades
never ceases to amaze me, particularly when you look at the case of the gentleman running WFW 1.1 and Excel 3.0, which were perfect for his needs, and yet he was unable to continue using these products on a newer platform.
It seems to me that MS want to be in a position to dictate to users exactly which OS and what office software they have to run on their systems - no doubt under penalty of death being gates' grand vision.

That said, the earlier post stating that what microsoft aredoing is merely good business strategy does indeed hold water. Although us techies may be getting frustrated with MS, your average 'illiterate' end-user really has no problem with it - allbeit until they hit a snag like using their old software on anew platform.

Is Microsoft destined to go the way of the Dodo? In all honesty, i dont think anyone is in a position to tell. We all know that huge companies have withered and died virtually overnight, the australian computer 'giant' Osborne was agood indication of that, but MS' stranglehold on the market at present shows no signs of relaxing. It may well be that public opinion will rise against them, but winXP being the catalyst? New licensing being the proverbial 'straw that broke the camel's back' ?
Id say most likely is that there is truth to this theory of impending demise for MS, but not to the extent that the *nix lovers of the world would like...
I think you might have a longer wait on your hands than you are hoping for my friends.

Addam Moody
Support Desk Engineer
ComputerCorp PTY LTD.

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Or hardware

by epepke In reply to Microsoft may not be out ...

What's going to happen when hardware breaks and drivers for new hardware isn't available?

I hear a lot of people saying that they aren't going to upgrade any time soon. Silly people! Who cares if it's soon? MS has been in business for a quarter of a century. They don't care what you do in the next 45 minutes or even in the next year or two.

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Early Release of Windows XP

by OverSold In reply to Is this the beginning of ...

Microsoft May Accelerate Release of Windows XP, ZDNet Reports
By Rachel Katz


Redmond, Washington, Aug. 8 (Bloomberg) -- Microsoft Corp. will let computer makers ship desktop and laptop computers with its Windows XP operating system as soon as late September, earlier than its official Oct. 25 debut, the ZDNet News Web site reported, citing unnamed people close to PC makers.

It's not clear how quickly consumers will be able to receive the computers because the testing process for the new operating system may be more complicated than that of earlier systems, ZDNet said. Microsoft said it is on schedule to introduce the product Oct. 25 and wouldn't comment further, ZDNet reported, citing Jim Cullinan, Windows XP's lead production manager.

Microsoft might be able to avoid injunctions on the new product by shipping it early. New rulings in the federal antitrust suit against Microsoft could include such an injunction, ZDNet said, citing Andy Gavil, an antitrust professor with Howard University's School of Law.

Early shipments would allow computer makers to start the fourth quarter with upgrades to XP, ZDNet said, citing Toni Duboise, an analyst with ARS Inc.

(ZDNet 8-

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Beginning of the end.

by admin In reply to Is this the beginning of ...

I suppose, by definition, it may have been as soon as it started. Is the XP outcry all that different from previous ones? We will know for sure in retrospect, but where did they really start to fall?
Perhaps MS really ended when there was no one to acquire a cheap new exciting os from to resale.
Maybe they ended when Mr. Gates became a humanitarian. Maybe they ended when a comet struck the Earth, or perhaps when we were inhaled by a normal sized dog from a distant, yet oddly near, dimension. It's so hard to predict really.

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