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i.t. generalist

By markand ·
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Dojos where I have trained

by markand In reply to i.t. generalist

For no good reason I decided to jot a few news about places I've trained. <br />
<br />
I stared my martial arts training in September 1997 at Do Chikara Ju
Kawa, a Kodenkan Jujitsu dojo led by Duwayne MacCraney Sensei.
This was a <a href="http://www.jujitsuamerica.org/">Jujitsu America</a>
dojo. The dojo met in the multi-purpuse room of the Pacific Grove
High School. Classes were offered as part of the Pacific Grove
Adult School. This training did me a powerful good. In a
year's time I dropped 25 pounds and earned my first kyu
certificate. When I was a jujitsoka I also attended a few classes
at Chow-Hoon Goshin Jitsu with Scott Merrill Sensei, and Chow-Hoon Dojo
Monterey Bay with Michael Blackburn Sensei. Unfortunately the PG
Adult School decided to go out
of the martial arts business and the dojo closed. I trained from
September 1997 to April 1999 and had to find a new home.<br />
<br />
That home was <a href="http://www.aikidomonterey.com/">Aikido of Monterey</a>, a school in the <a href="http://www.ai-ki-do.org/">California Aikido Association</a>.
My heart and spirit are still centered on Aikido, though my life
situation and interests have temporarily changed. I actively
trained in Aikido from April 1999 through August 2003 and am a 3rd kyu
in Aikikai Aikido. I tested for 2nd kyu, but wasn't ready for
that rank, so I kept training. My son arrived in August 2003 and
I trained
intermittantly after that. I left the dojo in May 2005, but still
train occasionally at Aikido of Monterey. The the time I left the
dojo I had accumulated 350+ training days after 3rd kyu.<br />
<br />
Its typical for martial arts students to train in other arts, or at
other dojo. Its considered good form to ask your "root" teacher's
permission to do this, but its not required. I have also
trained at <a href="http://www.pacificgroveaikido.com/">Pacific Grove Aikido</a>
(in Aikido) and the Yosokan Dojo at the Monterey Martial Arts Center
(in Jujitsu). I also trained 6 months, consistently, in Iaido at
the Monterey Budokan, home of <a href="http://www.seibukanjujutsu.com/">Seibukan Jujitsu</a>. I hold no rank in Iaido. When I travelled for work, I trained at the <a href="http://www.torontoaikikai.com/">Toronoto Aikido</a> (in Toronto, ON), The Eight Winds Aikido Society (in Gatier, MS), the <a href="http://www.kcaikido.com/">Kansas City Aikido School</a> (in Kansas City, KS) and at <a href="http://www.aikispokane.com/">Aikido Institute of Spokane</a> (in Spokane, WA). I trained in two classes at each dojo.<br />
<br />
I am visiting friends in Charlottesville, VA at the end of August 2005. I hope to train at <a href="http://www.aikispokane.com/">Aikido of Charlottesville</a> while I'm there. <br />
<br />
There is a remote chance I'll try jujitsu again, probably with my old
mates Tom Nonella and Hector Reynosa, at Chow-Hoon Dojo Monterey
Bay. I started training with Tommy and Hector 8 years ago, when
they were nikyus (brown belts) and I was nothin'. Now they are
both nidans (2nd back belt) and I'm, well, still gokyu (5th kyu) in
jujitsu. But I have some experience under my belt!<br />
<br />

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"Goethe" on committment

by markand In reply to i.t. generalist

A friend of mine gave me a copy of a quote from Goethe on committment.  Ever the librarian I had to track the <a href="http://www.goethesociety.org/pages/quotescom.html">source</a> of this quote down.  It turns out its not Goethe, but its still good.  Enjoy!<br />
<br />
Of the many inquiries about Goethe
and Goethe quotations that come to the Goethe Society of North
America through the website, the most oft repeated and vexing
one has been a passage about boldness, magic, and providence that
certainly sounded like Goethe, but eluded our attempts to track
it down. You may recall that in our Fall 1996 Newsletter an editor
at Celestial Seasonings Teas even offered some tea in exchange
for help in identifying it. Most inquiries focused on the closing
lines: "What you can do, or dream you can do, begin it! /
Boldness has genius, power and magic in it." But some cited
a fuller passage: <br />
<p class="STORYBOX" align="left">
<br />
"Until one is committed, there is hesitancy, the chance to
draw back-- Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation),
there is one elementary truth that ignorance of which kills countless
ideas and splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits
oneself, then Providence moves too. All sorts of things occur
to help one that would never otherwise have occurred. A whole
stream of events issues from the decision, raising in one's favor
all manner of unforeseen incidents and meetings and material assistance,
which no man could have dreamed would have come his way. Whatever
you can do, or dream you can do, begin it. Boldness has genius,
power, and magic in it. Begin it now." <br />
<br />
Well, it's been found and it is partly by Goethe, in a way. We
first heard from Ellen Todd Hanks, a senior information service
librarian at the Briscoe Library of the University of Texas Health
Science Center. She found a variant of the final two sentences
in Stevenson's <i>Home Book of Quotations</i>: "Boldness
has genius, power, and magic in it. Only engage, and then the
mind grows heated. Begin it, and the work will be completed."<br />
<br />
The lines are attributed to John Anster in a "very free translation"
of <i>Faust</i> from 1835. They are indeed "very free"
writes Katja Moser, who solved a larger piece of the mystery this
May, and provided a fuller excerpt from Anster's translation,
where the lines in question are spoken by the "Manager"
in the "Prelude at the Theatre": <br />
<br />
          Then indecision brings its own delays, <br />
          And days are lost lamenting over lost days. <br />
          Are you in earnest? Seize this very minute; <br />
          What you can do, or dream you can do, begin it; <br />
          Boldness has genius, power and magic in it.<br />
<br />
Moser points to <i>Faust</i>, 214-30, as the passage paraphrased
by Anster: <br />
<br />
          Der Worte sind genug gewechselt, <br />
          La?t mich auch endlich Taten sehn! <br />
          Indes ihr Komplimente drechselt, <br />
          Kann etwas N?tzliches geschehn. <br />
          Was hilft es, viel von Stimmung reden? <br />
          Dem Zaudernden erscheint sie nie. <br />
          Gebt ihr euch einmal f?r Poeten, <br />
          So kommandiert die Poesie. <br />
          Euch ist bekannt, was wir bed?rfen, <br />
          Wir wollen stark Getr?nke schl?rfen; <br />
          Nun braut mir unverz?glich dran! <br />
          Was heute nicht geschieht, ist morgen nicht getan, <br />
          Und keinen Tag soll man verpassen, <br />
          Das M?gliche soll der Entschlu? <br />
          Beherzt sogleich beim Schopfe fassen, <br />
          Er will es dann nicht fahren lassen <br />
          Und wirket weiter, weil er mu?. <br />
<br />
Katja Moser also identifies the author of the lengthier passage
being attributed to Goethe and, in doing so, reveals its connection
with John Anster's inventive paraphrase. She writes: <br />
<br />
"The quote as you give it in a larger context seems to be
from W. H. Murray in <i>The Scottish Himalaya Expedition</i>,
1951. There the text apparently goes: <br />
<br />
'But when I said that nothing had been done I erred in one important
matter. We had definitely committed ourselves and were halfway
out of our ruts. We had put down our passage money--booked a sailing
to Bombay. This may sound too simple, but is great in consequence.
Until one is committed, there is hesitancy, the chance to draw
back, always ineffectiveness. Concerning all acts of initiative
(and creation), there is one elementary truth the ignorance of
which kills countless ideas and splendid plans: that the moment
one definitely commits oneself, the providence moves too. A whole
stream of events issues from the decision, raising in one's favor
all manner of unforeseen incidents, meetings and material assistance,
which no man could have dreamt would have come his way. I learned
a deep respect for one of Goethe's couplets: <br />
<br />
          Whatever
you can do or dream you can, begin it. <br />
          Boldness
has genius, power and magic in it!'<br />
<br />
So, did Goethe say it? Not really. Thank you, Katja Moser, for
the discovery!
</p>
<p class="STORYBOX" align="right">Meredith Lee<br />
University of California, Irvine</p>
<br />

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Pope John Paul II on Mental Illness

by markand In reply to i.t. generalist

I found this on the <a href="http://www.nami.org">NAMI</a> (the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill) web site and am glad to share it.  The original link is <a href="http://www.nami.org/Template.cfm?Section=Faith_Community&template=/ContentManagement/ContentDisplay.cfm&ContentID=22409">here</a>:<br />
<p>April 8, 2005<br />
Pope John Paul II on Mental Illness<br />
As the world bids him farewell this week, NAMI remembers these remarks of Pope John Paul II from 1997</p>
<p>"[The Church] reminds the political community of its duty to
recognize and celebrate the divine image of man with actions that
support and serve all those who find themselves in a condition of
severe mental illness. This is a task which science and faith, medicine
and pastoral care, professional skill and a sense of common brotherhood
must help to carry out through an investment of adequate human,
scientific and socio-economic resources...</p>


<p>"Whoever suffers from mental illness 'always' bears God's image and
likeness in himself, as does every human being. In addition, he
'always' has the inalienable right not only to be considered as an
image of God and therefore as a person, but also to be treated as such.</p>


<p>"It is everyone's duty to make an active response; our actions must
show that mental illness does not create insurmountable distances, nor
prevent relations of true Christian charity with those who are its
victims. Indeed it should inspire a particularly attentive attitude..."</p>


<em>-- Pope John Paul II, International Conference for Health Care Workers, on Illnesses of the Human Mind, November 30, 1997<br />
<br />
</em>

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The Human Route

by markand In reply to i.t. generalist

<h2><strong><b>The Human Route</b></strong></h2>


<p><strong><em>Coming empty-handed, going empty-handed -- that is human.<br />
When you are born, where do you come from?<br />
When you die, where do you go?<br />
Life is like a floating cloud which appears.<br />
Death is like a floating cloud which disappears.<br />
The floating cloud itself originally does not exist.<br />
Life and death, coming and going, are also like that.<br />
But there is one thing which always remains clear.<br />
It is pure and clear, not depending on life and death. </em>

</strong></p>
<p><strong><em>Then what is the one pure and clear thing?<br />
</em></strong></p>
<p><strong><em>Zen Master Seung Sahn<br />
</em></strong></p>
<p><strong><em>Courtesty of <a href="http://www.kwanumzen.org">The Kwan Um School of Zen</a><br />
</em></strong></p>

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Sayings of Zen Master Kyong Ho

by markand In reply to i.t. generalist

<h2 align="center"><a href="i>Sayings">http://www.kwanumzen.com/misc/zmkyongho-sayings.html"><i>Sayings of</i></a></h2>


<h2 align="center"><a href="http://www.kwanumzen.com/misc/zmkyongho-sayings.html">Zen Master Kyong Ho</a><br />
(1849-1**2)<br />
<small><em>Great-grandteacher of Zen Master Seung Sahn
</em></small></h2>


<hr>

<ol>
<li>Don't wish for perfect health. In perfect health there is greed and wanting. So an
ancient said, "Make good medicine from the suffering of sickness."</li><li>Don't hope for a life without problems. An easy life results in a judgmental and lazy
mind. So an ancient once said, "Accept the anxieties and difficulties of this
life."</li><li>Don't expect your practice to be always clear of obstacles. Without hindrances the mind
that seeks enlightenment may be burnt out. So an ancient once said, "Attain
deliverance in disturbances."</li><li>Don't expect to practice hard and not experience the weird. Hard practice that evades
the unknown makes for a weak commitment. So an ancient once said, "Help hard practice
by befriending every demon."</li><li>Don't expect to finish doing something easily. If you happen to acquire something easily
the will is made weaker. So an ancient once said, "Try again and again to complete
what you are doing."</li><li>Make friends but don't expect any benefit for yourself. Friendship only for oneself
harms trust. So an ancient once said, "Have an enduring friendship with purity in
heart."'</li><li>Don't expect others to follow your direction. When it happens that others go along with
you, it results in pride. So an ancient once said, "Use your will to bring peace
between people."</li><li>Expect no reward for an act of charity. Expecting something in return leads to a
scheming mind. So an ancient once said, "Throw false spirituality away like a pair of
old shoes."</li><li>Don't seek profit over and above what your work is worth. Acquiring false profit makes a
fool (of oneself). So an ancient once said, "Be rich in honesty."</li><li>Don't try to make clarity of mind with severe practice. Every mind comes to hate
severity, and where is clarity in mortification? So an ancient once said, "Clear a
passageway through severe practice."</li><li>Be equal to every hindrance. Buddha attained Supreme Enlightenment without hindrance.
Seekers
after truth are schooled in adversity. When they are confronted by a hindrance, they can't
be over-come. Then, cutting free, their treasure is great.</li>
</ol>


<p><small>from <em>THOUSAND PEAKS: Korean Zen -- Tradition and Teachers</em> by Mu Soeng
(Primary Point Press, revised edition 19**)</small></p>


<hr>

<p align="center"><small><small>This page copyright ? Kwan Um School of Zen </small></small>
</p>

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"More than technical" (on Aikido practice)

by markand In reply to i.t. generalist

"I feel that the bulk of what I teach is more than technical. One major
thing I believe is that any resistance that we feel to anyone or any of
the feelings that come up inside us having to do with our training
partner and actual attacker or an uke, are really our own feelings. So
if I feel resistance when somebody grabs my wrist, it's my own
resistance. I can only feel my own feelings. So what I work at and what
I teach is that the place to remove the resistance is inside myself and
isn't about the one who is holding on to my wrist. For me, that
profoundly affects what manifests physically, because I do feel the
release of the resistance.<br />
<br />
This involves psychological and spiritual
implications for me too. I work with many people on boundaries, a
concept that's being worked with a lot now in the psychological growth,
healing and recovery movements. I feel that what allows us to move into
someone's personal space and have it be an expression of harmony is
moving in without judgement. I really carry this as far as I can, and
do not even call what's happening an attack, but remove the judgment
from it. I try to make my first reaction be to connect up with my own
center, and then, without judgement, to move in and from that place to
connect up with the center of another person, and not to be attached to
the outcome. As soon as I decide to stop the attack or defend against
it, then I feel what I've done is move out of the process I have
described."<br />
<br />
Danielle Molles Smith Sensei, 5th Dan & Dojo Cho<br />
Aikido of Monterey<br />
California Aikido Association<br />
<br />
From <a href="http://www.aikidojournal.com/article.php?articleID=200">"California Women Instructors (2)"</a> by Stanley Pranin, Aiki News #93 (Fall 1992).<br />

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Evaluation - 1 December 2004

by markand In reply to i.t. generalist

"I do my basic job - supporting staff & fixing things - well.
I like [where I work], its mission, clients & staff. I am
fascinated by behavioral health care & I.T. work in this field, and
consider this a career change from librarianship.<br />
<br />
"My challenges are not with my intelligence, intensions or demeanor,
but with [the] timely planning & execution of difficult projects,
without distraction by crisis or my favorite diversions.<br />
<br />
From my last evaluation.<br />
<br />
Mark Andrews<br />
<br />
<br />

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Evaluation - 1 December 2004

by DC Guy In reply to Evaluation - 1 December 2 ...

<p>That could be said about almost all of us. People who are really difficult to distract are not easy to get along with and I suspect they'd make terrible parents!</p>
<p>This sounds like a boilerplate criticism. "Gee, they warned me that I have to find something negative to say about everybody because there's no money in the budget for raises this year."</p>

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Evaluation - 1 December 2004

by markand In reply to Evaluation - 1 December 2 ...

Nope, it wasn't boilerplate - I was critiquing myself.<br />
<br />

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Why I can't support the American Library Association

by markand In reply to i.t. generalist

I used to be a member of the <a href="http://www.ala.org">American Library Association</a>.
While I support libraries, the services libraries provide to the public
and society, librarians and the library profession, I cannot support a
"professional" assocation whose leadership wastes its time on matters
of public policy, namely national security, that are entirely outside
its professional competence and responsibility.<br />
<br />
Individual citizens have the perfect right and responsibility to
declaim on these matters. But a library professional association
that passes public resolutions on the <a href="http://www.ala.org/Template.cfm?Section=News&template=/ContentManagement/ContentDisplay.cfm&ContentID=100930">war in Iraq</a> doesn't have enough to do.<br />
<br />
Let me make a comparison.<br />
<br />
I am a Roman Catholic. I accept, hold and support the teachings
of the Roman Catholic Church on the sanctity of human life. Human
life is sacred from a natural conception to a natural death.
Human dignity is not depedent on one person's opinion of another
- that dignity is inherant. It is not subject to the whim of a
person, state or culture.<br />
<br />
I'd like to know why the ALA Council doesn't pass a resolution in favor of <strong>my</strong> beliefs?<br />
<br />
The answer, simply put, is that the ALA Council has no interest,
competence or authority in the long-running debate in America about the
fundamental value of human life, and the kinds of thinking people do
around that issue, and the choices they make based on their beliefs and
thinking. Nor does ALA, the American <em><strong>Library</strong></em>
Association. No resolution I could favor or support could pretend
to represent the diversity of opinion among ALA members on such a
contentious issue.<br />
<br />
Similarly, a resolution about the war in Iraq (or war anywhere for that
matter) does not represent ALA's "mind" (to the extent that it has a
mind) on national security. At best, that resolution represents
only opintion of those who supported it.<br />
<br />
The American Library Association, in it self and it its "council,"
doesn't have any more knowledge or authority on issues of foreign
policy and national security than I do. I suggest ALA spend its
time on issues that actually matter to libraries and the people those
libraries serve: funding, funding, funding. And lest anyone claim
that funding for the war might magically be transferred to libraries,
the majority of library funding comes from local & state government
and from personal & corporate donors. Any increase in funding
is going to come from those sources closest to the people libraries
serve, not from the top down.<br />
<br />
These kind of resolutions make librarians and their association look
distracted, inane and innefective. And this librarian is TIRED of
it.<br />
<br />

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