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By markand ·
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How to do everything with Microsoft Office InfoPath 2003 by David McAmis

by markand In reply to i.t. generalist

After my digression into complaining about the American Library
Association, and posting some inspirational quotes (so I can get rid of
a little paper), its back to being an I.T. generalist. I've
amassed quite a bit of reading material (as I've said earlier), so its
time to get reading.<br />
<br />
My co-worker and I built a test server. One of the things we
thought we'd do with it is install Microsoft SharePoint Server 2003,
which I see as a portal server, but its much more than that. The
first thing I noticed is SharePoint requires Windows 2003 Server; in
fact the demo is bundled with a 6-month trial edition of Windows 2003
Server Enterprise Edition. This is overkill for us. The
company I work for has 8 Windows 2000 servers and 1 Windows 2003
server, which runs Exchange 2003. As the older Windows 2000
servers age out, they will be replaced with Windows 2003 machines, so
experience with Windows 2003 is helpful. But back to SharePoint
and InfoPath.<br />
<br />
InfoPath is bundled with Office 2003 and works with SharePoint
2003. The SharePoint product is bundled with a runtime edition of
Microsoft SQL Server 2003. I think it uses SQL server to store
its own parameters as well as content. I do not know if you
can use the licensed copy of:<br />
<br />
1) InfoPath 2003 with the SharePoint 2003 demo.<br />
<br />
2) Access 2003 with the SharePoint 2003 demo.<br />
<br />
3) InfoPath 2003 with the instance of SQL Server bundled with the SharePoint demo.<br />
<br />
4) Access 2003 with the instance of SQL Server bundled with the SharePoint demo.<br />
<br />
If that is not confusing enough, I have PostgreSQL 8.0 running on my
PC. I have thought if and how InfoPath or Access work with that
database either.<br />
<br />
When I got home from work I took another whack at <a href="http://techrepublic.com.com/5100-7343_11-5800150.html?tag=search">InfoPath</a> and <a href="http://techrepublic.com.com/5100-7343_11-5807000.html?tag=search">SharePoint</a>.  I found hints about both products on TechRepublic (just follow the links in the previous sentence).<br />
<br />

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InfoPath, SharePoint and HIPAA

by markand In reply to i.t. generalist

I'll continue the "HIPAA grind" this afternoon.  I'll focus on
identifying current sources of information on how best to comply with
the security rule.  As for applying the security rule in a small
non-profit, well we're writing that book by living it.  More news
as it happens.<br />
<br />
In the mean time I'm blazing through an introductory book on InfoPath,
and how to use InfoPath with SharePoint.  The current issue with
SharePoint is how to open it up for remote access to users inside our
network.  I'm using demonstration version of SharePoint, so the
only person who will be using it is me.<br />
<br />
The other news is that we've completed the Exchange 2000 Server to
Exchange 2003 Server migration without incident.  The actual
migration was done months ago.  I left the old Exchange 2000
Server system running out of superstition.  The Exchange 2000
services are finally shut down.  As long as Exchange 2003 doesn't
complain about its buddy being gone, well remove the software and the
old mailstore by Labor Day.<br />
<br />
The next little Exchange 2003 project will be installing the Microsoft
Exchange "Intelligent Message Filter."  We'll use this instead of
the Symantec Antivirus Corporate Edition spam filter; we have an SAV
corporate upgrade from v7.5 (in the field) and v9.0 (at he main office)
to v10.0 (across the enterprise).  There are 9 servers and 70+
workstations to upgrade, and 15 new PCs to receive, configure and
deploy, too.  As always there is plenty to do.<br />

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What I'm reading, pt. 5

by markand In reply to i.t. generalist

At the start of a new week I also started through the latest stack of reading, trying to keep it from getting too high.<br />
<br />
At the top of the list is the much hated (by me) "Healthcare IT News (only because its thin and a
little vapid).  In an earlier post I  described this as a
"vendor rag."  So there's a practical aspect to it, too, as the way
HIMSS members communicate among themselves about their upcoming
conference. It is hard to condemn that. If it didn't exist
it would have to be invented.<br />
<br />
So its not the internal
communication part of HITN I have problem with. Its the rest of
the unwashed - vendors, professionals and politicians - crowing about
the wonders, necessity and benefits of "healthcare I.T." It
reminds me of the movie "The Road to Wellsville," where the
fictionalized Kellog character kept crowing on about "exhonration of
the
bowels" and the "sin of Onan." I mean, who could possibly know
enough to agree or disagree with either of these statements? 
Nonetheless I found three useful things in the April 2005 issue of HITN:<br />
<br />
First, a political cartoon on p. 10, where a dump truck backs up to two
guys and unloads. One guy asks "What's that?" The other guy
says "This week's crop of heathcare I.T. bills." The dump truck
is from Congress.<br />
<br />
A word to our friends in Congress and the state legislatures: stop
already with the healthcare I.T. bills.  Don't we already have
enough to do, like comply with HIPAA?  How about some money for
that - for PROVIDERS?  Its like
Congress, seeing a stinking mess in heathcare I.T., hands everyone
involved a shovel instead of asking why there is so much manure in the
first place. Yeah, the shovel is needed, but why on earth is
healthcare I.T. so hard to do?  Keep reading....<br />
<br />
Second, Peter Goltra, in his piece "Place 'operability' ahead of
interoperability," hits the nail on the head. If 'healthcare
I.T." doesn't work in the provider's exam room and office, nothing else
matters. How do you get useable software? Focus groups,
"extreme programming," testing, documentation, support, planning - all those things vendors
love to talk about but won't spend money on. How's this for a
suggestion: fire any three vice presidents and hire 6 more
testers in their place? The officers of software companies may
complain that "I've never led a company." True, but I've never
seen any of them bust a sweat personally delivering working product on
time, release after release after release.  Just how does one deliver
working product on time?<br />
<br />
Third, see Glen Knight's piece called "Healthcare I.T. needs project
management." Knight is dead-to-right when he says there is a "20
percent failure rate" for health care I.T. projects in Canada, and by
extension the U.S.  That failure rate is probably low.  I ask
you, would you buy a care built that
way?  I suggest to the boards of directors of health care I.T.
companies is that only people who hold a PMP ticket from the Project
Management Institute are promoted into management;  those people
should
come from mechanical and construction engineering, where you have to be
licensed by the state to create a physical object (on time and budget)
that solves a problem and protects human life.  It is long past
time to turn "software engineering" into a reality.  Its an
oxymoron now.<br />
<br />
Dear Congress:  I'd like more money (immediately followed by
less of your involvement) for:<br />
<br />
 * after-the-fact reviews of failed projects<br />
 * more
project management training<br />
 * more engineers in the I.T. business<br />
<br />
And a far more jaundiced form of board
oversight of senior management in private and public companies.  I don't mind if senior management
gets paid a bizillion dollars for their successes, as long as
they are publically caned for their failures.<br />
<br />
Okay, so maybe Healthcare IT News was useful this month.<br />
<br />
From I.T. to personal reading, a few quick comments.<br />
<br />
Tanya Theriault's article, "The Genesis of Our Faith," on Avivah
Gottlieb Zornberg's approach to the Midrash, is very good.  It
appeared in the January-February 2005 issue of "The Catholic
Worker."  Zornberg's reflections are helpful in my own writing.<br />
<br />
J. Budziszewski's "Designed for Sex" in the July/August 2005 issue of
Touchstone: a journal of mere Christianity, is very, very good.<br />
<br />
I took a whack at the June/July 2005 and August/September 2005 issues
of First Things.  I confess I don't have the patience for these
right now.  I cut to the chase and read Richard John Neuhaus' "The
Public Square."  When I read Neuhaus I grown inwardly for an
editor.  A ruthless one.  As an English professor of mine
once said, after Strunk & White, "not one word where silence will
do."  <br />
<br />

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Restarting the i.t. generalist blog

by markand In reply to i.t. generalist

I read and re-read what I wrote on my old blog, at TechRepublic, and I decided to start over. I digress alot, in to politics, religion, spirituality, you name it. I suppose that is what makes blogs wonderful, but I am at my best when I am on-topic.<br /><br />That topic is working as an i.t. generalist at a non-profit agency that provides psychosocial rehabilitation and housing services in Monterey, CA. The challenges include (but are not limited to):<br /><br /> * HIPAA compliance, including privacy & security issues<br /> * Project planning & management<br /> * Business continuity & contingency planning<br /> * Running a Windows shop<br /> * Continuing education & training<br /> * Lessons taught by failure & success<br /><br />and other issues as they arise. I'll re-publish this web log at TechRepublic too.<p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://itgeneralist.blogspot.com/2005/08/restarting-it-generalist-blog.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Compliance as a continuing process

by markand In reply to i.t. generalist

As I thought about my huge pile of HIPAA reading to do re/compliance work I realized that compliance is an ongoing process, not a static event with a convenient close. No can say they have complied with HIPAA, only that they are complying and can demontrate that fact.<br /><br />And compliance goes hand-in-hand with client & patient privacy practices, continuous attention to security, and (in the light of Hurricane Katrina) with business continuity planning. Whether it is business growth (at best) or crime, natural disaster or terrorism (at worst), a business must plan to exist, not just hope for the best.<p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://itgeneralist.blogspot.com/2005/09/compliance-as-continuing-process.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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