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By jkameleon ·
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Are IT Jobs Good Jobs?

by JamesRL In reply to Are IT Jobs Good Jobs?

<p>Aligning IT with the business does not equal turning techies into managers.</p>
<p>Aligning IT with the business means someone in IT management has to understand the strategic and tactical objectives of the business, and set IT objectives which support the business.</p>
<p>I'm sorry but I've seen too many IT shops where the inmates run the prison. IT is to serve the business. IT is not so you can play with all the neat toys. IT shops that don't realize this find themselves outsourced - I've seen it happen.</p>
<p>Everything you do in IT should be able to be defined as either a cost of doing business (providing infrastructure), increasing revenue or decreasing costs. If your IT organization focusses on this, then the business will ultimately be happy and not look to outsource.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>James</p>

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Are IT Jobs Good Jobs?

by brian_ng In reply to Are IT Jobs Good Jobs?

I would not recomment to my sons or daughters too

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Another gem of managerial wisdom

by jkameleon In reply to Just another blog

<a href="http://www.informationweek.com/blog/main/archives/2005/10/improving_the_i.html">
http://www.informationweek.com/blog/main/archives/2005/10/improving_the_i.html</a><br />
<br />
<table id="Table1" border="1">
<tbody><tr>
<td>Can you smell it? There's something in the air, but it's not the autumnal
hearth. A smoldering anger, something I'd call "code rage," is everywhere,
spilling over into, permeating, and often dominating every discussion we've had
with readers this year about the state of the IT industry, IT careers, and
education. For each commentator who loves the industry and offers upbeat
advice, you'll find 10 or more cynical, resentful, and seething posts.</td>
</tr>
</tbody></table>
<br />
1 to 10 upbeat/smoldering ratio roughly matches the results of Desktop Pipeline
poll, mentioned in <a href="http://techrepublic.com.com/5254-6257-0.html?forumID=99&threadID=180722&messageID=1872668&id=4210633">
the previous blog entry</a>.<br />
<!--startfragment -->

<br />
<table id="Table2" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1">
<tbody><tr>
<td>
Nonetheless, code rage is a very real, very now staffing issue bubbling under
the surface at many IT shops. I know the fundamental underlying issues fueling
that rage are unlikely to change for many workers, but perhaps there are
adjustments, changes, and accommodations that can be made in the workplace to
make work a better place for everyone. I wonder how IT managers and HR
departments are dealing with workers who feel undervalued, overworked,
underpaid. Of course, there's a degree of that in any industry, but it seems
like a full-blown epidemic in IT. And regardless of how the business side views
or values IT's role in your company, IT managers have to address this issue.<font color="red">
You can't change the reality of the industry</font> or even necessarily the
attitude of your business compatriots, but you can, at minimum, effect some
changes within the confines of your department. In other words, how can you
make a tough situation easier to bear?
</td>
</tr>
</tbody></table>
<p>Sorry, but there are only two options here:</p>
<ul>
<li>
To go and change the reality.
</li>
<li>
To sit and wait for reality to change by itself.</li></ul>
<p>Any attempt of sticking the bandaid over it will just add
another layer on decades old deposit of toxic waste, remnant of thousands of
management fads.</p>

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Boom & Bust Blues

by jkameleon In reply to Just another blog

<a href="http://www.computerworld.com/careertopics/careers/labor/story/0,10801,81112,00.html">http://www.computerworld.com/careertopics/careers/labor/story/0,10801,81112,00.html</a><br />
<br />
<table border="1">
<tbody><tr><td>
. . . For IT workers in the trenches, the good news is that layoffs are
slowing, actual pay cuts are largely a thing of the past, and only 4%
of corporate IT departments are considering moving jobs offshore in the
next year.<br />
<br />
Yeah -- that's what qualifies as good news these days.<br />
<br />
Trouble is, the survey doesn't show what lies just beneath that feeble
good news: Corporate IT morale is in the toilet. And the No. 1 reason
is the one thing you can't do much about: the long, long hours.<br />
<br />
You can't do much about the hours your people work because the work has
to get done and there's no budget for hiring more people to do it. So
more and more of our best people are coming to the conclusion that
there's a better life to be had than grinding away in an IT shop.<br />
<br />
And who will you lose at the first opportunity? Your smartest, sharpest
people, that's who. Your IT shop leaders. The ones who best understand
the connection between IT and business. The ones you'll need the most,
once you get the green light to start building new projects again.<br />
<br />
They're the ones who don't have to stay -- who can take their corporate
IT experience and parlay it into a new career, whether that means
conventional IT consulting or a new specialist gig combining law and
IT, medicine and IT or some other profession and IT.<br />
<br />
And why should they stay? They're smart enough to understand that this
crunch isn't a one-time thing. We've been through it before. First
there's an IT skills shortage: IT shops go crazy looking for ways to
fill critical jobs, and IT becomes the hot place to work. Then a few
years later the business tightens up, layoffs mount, salaries fall,
hours get long and college students switch their majors to anything but
computer science. Which, a few years later, results in another shortage
-- and the cycle begins again. No wonder your best people want to
leave. They love their work, but what sane person would want to build a
career on that sort of manic-depressive boom-and-bust cycle?<br />
</td></tr></tbody>
</table>
<br />
Amen.<br />
<br />
<br />

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Another juicy piece of "it shortage" propaganda to chew on

by jkameleon In reply to Just another blog

<p><a href="http://www.toptechnews.com/story.xhtml?story_id=3**97">http://www.toptechnews.com/story.xhtml?story_id=3**97</a></p>

<table border="1">
<tbody><tr>
<td>American companies have to look overseas to fill their I.T. openings, ...</td>
</tr>
</tbody></table>
Ooooh, poor dears! It breaks my heart. Honestly.<br />
<br />

<table id="Table1" border="1">
<tbody><tr>
<td>American women miss out on a growing and, <font color="#ff0000">let's be honest</font>,
potentially well-paying career.</td>
</tr>
</tbody></table>
So, normally you are not honest. It figures.<br />
<br />
<br />



<table id="Table3" border="1">
<tbody><tr>
<td>It's
getting worse. The Information Technology Association of America says
the country needs more I.T. workers than ever, and it expects the trend
to continue. </td>
</tr>
</tbody></table>
So what. ITAA <strong>always</strong> says the country needs more I.T. workers than ever. Even in 2000: <a href="http://www2.cio.com/metrics/2000/metric86.html">http://www2.cio.com/metrics/2000/metric86.html</a><br />
<br />
<br />


<table id="Table4" border="1">
<tbody><tr>
<td>Organizations desperate for the <font color="#ff0000">right</font>
I.T. workers are either outsourcing to
other countries (a practice that gets a lot of press, but has in fact
been on the decline)</td>
</tr>
</tbody></table>
"Right" means cheap, obedient, and witlessly enthusiastically geekish. It might
just turn out, however, that even India & China combined can't
produce as much such <em>right</em> I.T.workers as IT industry is willing to consume, wear out, and throw away.<br />
<br />Judging from theese here writings <a href="http://www.indicthreads.com/blogs/316/software_job_india.html">
http://www.indicthreads.com/blogs/316/software_job_india.html</a>,
our Indian collegaues are on a fast track to a massive burnout. This is
the only possible cause of decline of outsourcing- if there really is a
decline, which I doubt.<br />
<br />
<br />

<table id="Table5" border="1">
<tbody><tr>
<td>
. . . even the <font color="#ff0000">tremendous shortages</font> of I.T.
workers noted in the I.T.AA studies could be filled," it wrote in a report
entitled, "The Supply of Information Technology Workers in the United States."</td>
</tr>
</tbody></table>Tremendous
shortages!? I wander what the author of this article smokes. Now let's
see... "The Supply of Information Technology Workers in the United
States." ... <a href="http://www.cra.org/reports/wits/cra.wits.html">http://www.cra.org/reports/wits/cra.wits.html</a>
<p>Dotcomboom/Y2K -ish drivel written in 1999... Nuff said.</p>
<p>
<br />

<table id="Table6" border="1">
<tbody><tr>
<td>
<p>The perception that a computer career means working alone</p>
<p>"They don't see the I.T. field as being a field where they can help people,"</p>
<p>"Girls tend to imagine that computer professionals live in a solitary,
antisocial and sedentary world,"
</p>
</td>
</tr>
</tbody></table>
Theese perceptions are quite correct.<br />
<br />

<table id="Table7" border="1">
<tbody><tr>
<td>Hollins and Seckinger agreed wholeheartedly. "I don't want to sit in front of a
computer all day," they said, disturbingly, in unison.</td>
</tr>
</tbody></table>Yup,
women are definitively smarter than men. I doubt "horrible IT workforce
shortage" crowd will ever manage to delude them into IT.
So, who's gonna be next? Well, if everything fails, there are always
primates <a href="http://www.newtechusa.com/ppi/main.asp">
http://www.newtechusa.com/ppi/main.asp</a></p>

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Another juicy piece of

by gardoglee In reply to Another juicy piece of "i ...

<p>Yep, I just sit in front of my computer all day.  At least, on some occasions when there aren't client specification meetings, leadership and teamwork meetings, design/code/documentation/testing review meetings, training sessions, team meetings, staff meetings, and travelling to and from the client site.  Yep, I get to sit in front of my PC, on average, about 1.5 hours per day.</p>
<p>I don't know where you are, but it sounds awfully peaceful to me.  CAn I come visit?</p>

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Another juicy piece of

by goal120 In reply to Another juicy piece of "i ...

<p>Weird -- I went into desktop support so I could help people and be more social!  Sure I spend some time alone figuring things out, but I spend more time out visiting every single person here with a computer (or phone or copier or PLC or anything electrical) problem.  I am one of the few who knows almost everyone who works here.  It can be a very social and fun job/career.  </p>
<p>I don't see an overabundance of jobs though, so I think the "shortage" stories are just HB1 visa-pushers' propaganda, just like with engineers.</p>

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Gartner Predicts End of I.T. Specialists

by jkameleon In reply to Just another blog

<a href="http://www.tekrati.com/T2/Analyst_Research/ResearchAnnouncementsDetails.asp?Newsid=6101">http://www.tekrati.com/T2/Analyst_Research/ResearchAnnouncementsDetails.asp?Newsid=6101</a><br />
<a href="http://www.toptechnews.com/story.xhtml?story_id=39332">http://www.toptechnews.com/story.xhtml?story_id=39332</a><br />
<br />
The average I.T. department in midsize and
large companies by 2010 will be 30 percent smaller than they currently
are. "Some I.T. roles will be bolstered, some will be carved up, some
will be redistributed and some will be displaced," said Diane Morello,
a vice president of research at Gartner.

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Information Week, April 24, 2000

by jkameleon In reply to Just another blog

Pretty much out of this world, huh?<br />
<br />
<a href="http://www.informationweek.com/783/salary.htm">http://www.informationweek.com/783/salary.htm</a><br />
<br />
<font face="arial" size="4">
It's hip--and profitable--to be in IT. <i>InformationWeek</i>'s
annual salary survey shows compensation packages continue to rise as
the demand for IT talent outstrips the supply--and technology workers
are enjoying newfound respect from the business community.<br />
. . .<br />
</font>
<p>

<font color="#000000" face="geneva,arial,helvetica" size="2">There are
three constants for talented IT professionals, says Daversa: passion
for the work, the prestige associated with it, and the prosperity it
offers. In the pursuit of ever-greater compensation and challenge, the
love of the work remains.</font></p>


<font color="#000000" face="geneva,arial,helvetica" size="2">Enamics
Inc's Saltzman may echo other IT professionals' sentiments when she
says she just can't stay away. "When I started my career, I migrated
away from technology for a while, but I came back to tech because
things change so fast," she says. "Nothing ever gets stale. People who
end up in the field reflect that. It's very exciting, and a great world
to be in."</font><br />

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Well said

by jkameleon In reply to Just another blog

<a href="http://www.silicon.com/ciojury/0,3800003161,3**53795,00.htm">http://www.silicon.com/ciojury/0,3800003161,3**53795,00.htm</a><br />
<br />
"So-called talent wars are trumped up by those that aren't thinking
long term, pay dirt and then complain when they lose staff. Train your
team, give them stretch assignments and interesting projects, work with
them to develop and they'll stay. Also, if we as IT leaders are doing
our job correctly we shouldn't be worried when we do lose talent to
elsewhere as we'll have nurtured other stars coming up through the
ranks."<br />

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