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Just another blog

By jkameleon ·
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There is no shortage of tech talent, and it never will be...

by jkameleon In reply to Just another blog

... save the failure of globalization, and new cold war.<br /><br />Before globalization, techies employed in R&amp invented stuff, that was to be produced for their domestic market, usually a couple of millions of people big. After globalization, the market became a couple of billions big, however, a couple of competing R&amp departments are still enough for a particular class of products. Products are produced in a couple of hundred times bigger series, but ammount of work done by their inventors remains the same. Following this logic, demand for creative, inventive work is dropping as markets get bigger, and more homogenuous. If size of a market increases from 6 millions to 6 billions, demand for creative inventive work drops 1000 times. There will still be demand for techies of course, but only for routine jobs.<br /><br />Guiding youth into technical professions is therefore pretty sordid way of doing things. Its something like sending spam, or worse.<br /><br />Spammer sends out millions of emails. Never mind, if only a couple of people get swindled. Email is (almost) free.<br /><br />Similarily, "tech tallent shortage" lobbyists constantly gripe about "talent shortage" "it workforce shortage", "labour crunch", and so on, unless tech labour market is totally, hopelessly and obviously glutted. In this case, they are warning and projecting future labour crunches. Never mind, if only a couple of youngsters get swindled by this, and average employer's tech labour costs drop only 13 dollars per year. Bellyaching is free.<br />

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Why Should I Invest in a Career in the CS or IT field?

by jkameleon In reply to Just another blog

<a href="http://www.nitea.org/viewpoint.cfm?vpID=6">http://www.nitea.org/viewpoint.cfm?vpID=6</a><br />
<br />
<em>So, what can we do to combat the prevalent
and widespread misinformation regarding employment levels and future
opportunities in the CS and IT fields? I strongly believe that the IT
Industry, the National Science Foundation and industry groups such as
ITAA need to recognize the strategic importance of more effectively
communicating to our secondary school students and the general public
the facts regarding the many and varied career opportunities in our
field. Subsequently, these groups need to mount a major public
relations campaign featuring role models . . .</em><br />
<br />
Role models? Like... Dilbert, for example?<br />
<br />
<em><br />
Sadly, if students do not begin reentering,
and subsequently completing, college degree programs in the computing
science fields, companies in the United States will not have the
expertise and skills required to compete globally, and will have no
option but to begin outsourcing the many jobs that the Bureau of Labor
Statistics are projecting in the computer science and information
technology fields through 2020.</em> <br />
<br />
So, let me see... Because kids won't study CS & IT because
companies outsource, companies will have no other option but to
outsource.<br />
<br />
<br /><img alt="*** rolling my eyes ***" src="http://2darkpark.com/2dP/menu/other/IMPS/equal/rolleyes/catroll.jpg" /><br />
<br />

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Engineering Gap? Fact and Fiction

by jkameleon In reply to Just another blog

<a href="http://www.businessweek.com/smallbiz/content/jul2006/sb20060710_949835.htm">http://www.businessweek.com/smallbiz/content/jul2006/sb20060710_949835.htm</a> :<br /><p><i>The <cite>Wall Street Journal</cite> reported that
Microsoft received r?sum?s from about 100,000 graduating students in
2004, screened 15,000 of them, interviewed 3,500, and hired 1,000. It
said that Microsoft receives about 60,000 r?sum?s a month for its 2,000
open positions.</i></p> And they still complain about shortages...<br />

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A nice "talent shortage" type bellyaching from the past.

by jkameleon In reply to Just another blog

It was published in 1997, but it's all in there: Bad image of the IT
profession, nerd stereotype, plummeting enrollments, worries about US
leadership in technology... Yet, there was no shortage of graduates
anytime since the article was published. On the contrary.<br />
<br />

<a href="http://www.nocklebeast.net/Links/native/dilbert.txt">http://www.nocklebeast.net/Links/native/dilbert.txt</a><br />
<br />

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Lobbyist logic

by jkameleon In reply to Just another blog

<a href="http://www.pcworld.ca/news/column/326367610a01040800afaa8557d81d44/pg0.htm">http://www.pcworld.ca/news/column/326367610a01040800afaa8557d81d44/pg0.htm</a><br />
<br />
<em>
In Alberta, for instance, despite a consistently high rate of
economic growth, the market for IT-related jobs has been
decreasing, according to the Intuit study. Demand for computer
professionals in that province in 2005 was about 27,938, while the
supply of skilled IT workers was higher, at 28,985. This is
discouraging students from enrolling in computer science and
engineering programs. At the University of Alberta, only half of
the 130 available spaces in these programs were filled last
year.<br />
<br />

"Government and business should work together to help educational
institutions fill the computer science programs and provide
incentives there," says Stephen King, Intuit Canada
vice-president.</em><br />
<br />
<br />
So: Supply of skilled IT workers is higher than demand, and enrollment
in
computer science conseqently drops, in accordance of the laws of the
market. And that is supposed to be the sign of the looming critical IT
skill shortage in the near future. Oh, dear. Somebody must have cut
Mari-Len De Guzman's oxygen supply while she was in the incubator. Or,
maybe... she's just trying to convey us a message in a very subtle way.<br />
<br />

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Developing the Future

by jkameleon In reply to Just another blog

I haven anything better to do yesterday, so I browsed to this famous
overhyped hype about the alleged skill shortage in the UK software
industry.<br />
<br />
<a href="http://news.zdnet.co.uk/business/employment/0,39020648,39278217,00.htm">http://news.zdnet.co.uk/business/employment/0,39020648,39278217,00.htm</a><br />
<br />
Here it is, in it's entirerty<br />
<br />
<a href="http://download.microsoft.com/documents/UK/citizenship/Developing_the%20_Future2006.pdf">http://download.microsoft.com/documents/UK/citizenship/Developing_the%20_Future2006.pdf</a><br />
<br />
There's a whole lot of anectotical evidence, wise words from various
PHBs, and, lo and behold, on page 17, even some statistics. ?The
numbers have fallen off a cliff.?, dramatically announces Karen Price,
Chief Executive, e-skills-UK. But are they?<br />
<br />
<br />
Figure 2 - UCAS Computer Science Applicants 1996 - 2005: Levelled on pre dot com bubble levels.<br />
<br />
Figure 3 - UCAS Engineering/Information Systems Applicants 1996 - 2005: Falling, but still about 10 times pre dot com bubble.<br />
<br />
Figure 4 - UCAS Software Engineering Applicants 1996 - 2005: Levelling slightly below pre dot com bubble level.<br />
<br />
<br />
Fallen off a cliff allright.<br />
<br />
There's only one thing that can and will kill the software industry: Halfwit PHBs, like the authors of "Developing the Future".<br />
<br />
<br />
On the other side of the world, here's what Indians have to say about it:<br />
<br />
<em>Pink slip awaiting 21,000 Britons by 2008</em><br />

<br />

<a href="http://www.financialexpress.com/fe_full_story.php?content_id=13**89">http://www.financialexpress.com/fe_full_story.php?content_id=13**89</a><br />
<br />
Looming IT labor shortage my ***.<br />
<br />

<br />
<br />

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