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Lots of IT jobs but vacant for MONTHS!

By murso ·
I am just wondering if anyone else has noticed the following trend and why it is happening. Starting around 12/05, I noticed more IT jobs began to open up in my area after the "drop off a sheer cliff" back in '00. Now, companies are begging for IT staff and yet they are taking weeks and months to actually hire people. The jobs are posted and stay posted for as long as 8 months or more.

But why?????????????

There are thousands of highly skilled and talented IT folk in my area, I personally have more work freelance than I can handle and yet companies cannot seem to get off their asses to actually hire someone.
One position I had applied for back in March is STILL up for grabs and it is basic IT stuff. I finally emailed the HR person in frustration just to get a bead on why the position was still open and she said the "interview team" was still gathering itself to start the process after getting hundreds (her words) of qualified applicants.

Anyone got any clues about this trend?

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Then just say NO

by TechExec2 In reply to On postings "requiring" s ...

If they insist on you disclosing salary history and expectations before they will even talk to you, just walk away. I'm serious. You're very unlikely to get a satisfactory offer anyway.

If it means walking away from IT employment altogether, so be it. You would be very forward thinking to do so.

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You are right and have done in the last 2 weeks...

by murso In reply to Then just say NO

Twice. You are right, I am not going to get what is fair anyway.

One who asked that I disclose and I did then emailed me back that they were only looking at canidates that wanted $50K and less - preferably less.

Job description? Move an entire hospital to voIP, migrate servers NT-->2003, desktops-->terminals, wifi in the halls, blackberrys, laptops, vpn, you name it. Oh and did I mention they wanted an extensive EMR systems setup/migration?

Yeah, I don't think so.

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This List...

by NOW LEFT TR In reply to You are right and have do ...

Move an entire hospital to voIP, migrate servers NT-->2003, desktops-->terminals, wifi in the halls, blackberrys, laptops, vpn

is Technically not that hard you know....
Takes more than just one person however!!!!!!

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How'd ya guess they only wanted one person eom

by murso In reply to This List...
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Companies want way too much for way too little

by dayna_thomas In reply to Might also be because...

1) Yup, job descriptions want senior people for junior or even entry level money.

2) I do believe it's majorly caused by offshore firms who send in people at rates not compatible with the US lifestyle. I've been accused of being greedy by more than one Indian firm because I wouldn't take a 35% pay cut, and as a DBA with 2 college degrees and 20 years IT experience I was pulling in $35 an hour as it was!! Sorry, but here we don't share a car, live 4 to a room in a residence hotel and go back after 6 months. Mortgages, college funds, retirement planning and etc. aren't unreasonable expectations after putting in years of education and working our way up through the ranks, at least I don't think they are, and neither do my friends and colleagues who moved here permanently from India years ago and now hear the same thing.

3) In the last 2 weeks, I've gotten calls for "we want someone to gather the business requirements, analyze the data, create data models, prepare the source-to-target maps, write the ETL code and create the physical databases." Well, if you can find one person who can do all that, they're either lying, not deeply experienced in any of them, or want way more than $30/hour with no benefits.

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I love the current job postings

by jmgarvin In reply to Companies want way too mu ...

Recently, in the newspaper there was a "Senior Sys Admin" position. They wanted a db admin, net admin, security admin, sys admin, and help desk all in one position.

It boiled down to:
1) Support Oracle and SQL dbs
2) Support routers, switches, and install networking to new site
3) Write policy and implement with various security appliances
4) Maintain servers and desktops
5) Support 500 users

Ya, one person is gonna do that...for 40k/year no less.

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Ooo, sounds like my kinda job - wait, it IS :) eom

by murso In reply to I love the current job po ...
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Another Possibility

by jdmercha In reply to Lots of IT jobs but vacan ...

They may get a job opening when somebody leaves. Then they post the job to find a replacement. In the meantime they see how they get along without anybody in that position. If they get along just fine, then they will eliminate that postition. I've seen a few jobs in your area, that were open for over a year. They just never filled the position and eliminated it from their staffing chart they had on the web.

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Nail on head

by murso In reply to Another Possibility

I think this may also be more the case than not. For instance the one vacant for 8 months. They need an IT Director AND a Sys Admin. They MUST be outsourcing.

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Contradictions mean there is more to understand

by TechExec2 In reply to Lots of IT jobs but vacan ...

.
"I am just wondering if anyone else has noticed the following trend and why it is happening. Starting around 12/05, I noticed more IT jobs began to open up in my area after the "drop off a sheer cliff" back in '00."

Can you cite examples? Specifically which job boards? I could offer better comments if I could see what you are referring to. Personally, I do not pay much attention to job postings for a bunch of different reasons.


"Now, companies are begging for IT staff and yet they are taking weeks and months to actually hire people. The jobs are posted and stay posted for as long as 8 months or more."

If a company REALLY has a need and wants to hire someone, they do it. Any "job" that is posted for 8 months is not a "real" job. Examples:

1. The job is posted but hiring is on hold for various reasons (this nonsense happens all the time).

2. The offered pay is so low that qualified applicants seek other positions first, second, and third, before even considering the one listed for 8 months. They clearly don't need this position filled very badly. Or...

3. The job is listed only to compare skills/rates with the outsourcing vendor they are considering or using.

4. The job is being listed simply to justify getting an H-1B visa allocation from Uncle Sam.


"One position I had applied for back in March is STILL up for grabs and it is basic IT stuff. I finally emailed the HR person in frustration just to get a bead on why the position was still open and she said the "interview team" was still gathering itself to start the process after getting hundreds (her words) of qualified applicants."

Of course, she told you a lie. Something else is going on.


H-1B visa workers are very attractive

I think a lot of this is to justify more H-1B visas from Congress. More lies about "jobs Americans won't do". Too outlandish to be true? Anyone who thinks so is very naive.

Even the "pro-labor" Democrats are not going to "fix" this. You are part of their constituency, but so are the corporations who want to pay less, and CAN with the H-1B. Also, your fellow citizens who want to pay less for goods and services want the corporations to pay you less. The same mechanism works against medical doctors where everyone wants great medical care for less.

There is a quiet effort to get the H-1B limit completely removed. Legislation has even been written (rejected so far). If that ever happens, it will be very bad for American IT people.

H-1B workers:

- They are highly educated.

- They work cheap compared to Americans.

- They work in modern day indentured servitude. Can't quit or shop for a better job easily. An ideal worker, and more desirable than you.

- They don't get to compete in the job market vs. the real American workers. They only compete with each other to get selected to be paid at the company-specified rate once the company qualifies for the H-1B visa.

- Their mere presence in the workforce lowers pay rates for everyone, even though they don't compete for the jobs. Nice, if you are an employer.

Murphy's Law: Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong.

Corollary: Anything that can happen...DOES. (think about it)

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