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Musings on the TR Community project

By Beth Blakely ·
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Why the US lacks engineers

by ironfist03 In reply to Why the US lacks engineer ...

<p>I strongly agree that a major gender bias has been going on for some time. I have a daughter whom used to come home in tears because her math teachers (plural as this went on her entire k12 experience) would not let her answer any of the questions or do any of the problems in class. it mostly went like this; " she/he (teachers) let 3 or 4 boys do the work on the blackboard or answer questions and they did it wrong when I (daughter) knew the correct answers and formulas".  My daughter is quite gifted in math and as an example of why teachers are failing the female gender, one day about a couple of months after i had bought her first scientific calculator she was doing her home work longhand on a pad, i asked "why aren't you using your calculator?", she replied " i only use it to check my answers on some of the harder stuff I can feel the numbers better when I write them out". My god, at that point I suddenly realized that she had a gift and for her entire k12 experience despite numerous parent teacher talks she was never given the opportunity or guidance to pursue a career in mathematics. She is currently on the deans list at a respected university where she will graduate as a pharmacist. I know it sounds more like I'm blowing my own horn at this point but I felt the background was necessary(and admittly I am a proud father) to make the point that it does not matter if the teacher is male or female, there is a culture of unconcionable bias against a female student who wishes to excel at mathematics in the k-12 schools. That along with an almost criminal lack of effective teaching of math skills in general is 90% of the problem of not enough engineers. Our businesses are forced to import engineers or export the jobs as a result. </p>
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I challenge you: Post your favorite tip in a blog!

by Beth Blakely In reply to Musings on the TR Communi ...

<p>I used to teach software to the old and young, quick and slow, and the willing and forced (by their supervisors). Nothing was worse than facing a room full of sour faces at 8 a.m. knowing that I'd have to drag them through 8 hours of training, whether they liked it or not. Of course, I usually won people over with my sparkling personality and natural charm. The others required something more: actual learning.</p>
<p>Sometimes I'd have seasoned computer geeks in my more rudimentary classes. They were usually part of a small company whose management had decided that <em>everyone</em> must take x, y, and z courses. They'd come in looking bored, immediately start tinkering with the workstations, and pay me the least amount of attention possible. It was always a personal victory if I was able to pull a rabbit out of my hat and actually teach these guys something they could use.</p>
<p>It didn't have to be a huge thing. For example, I can remember mentioning to several folks that you could just type any word--Amazon, for example--into IE's address bar and hit CTRL+Enter to automatically add the <a href="http://www">http://www</a>. and .com before and after. It's a tiny thing, but it can save you a lot of time if you use it consistently. There was nothing greater than seeing the surprised smile on those pros faces when they realized I'd actually shown them something useful.</p>
<p>So this week, fair bloggers, I challenge you to post your favorite tip or trick in a blog post. Share the wealth of your knowledge! You never know who you might help.</p>

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I challenge you: Post your favorite tip in a blog!

by master3bs In reply to I challenge you: Post you ...

<p>Hard to think of something that people here wouldn't know about.</p>
<p>Back when I did phoneside desk support; a constant struggle was determining what version of Windows an end user was running.  I learned that by going to the run command and entering <strong>winver</strong> it will automatically tell you what OS and build a Windows machine is running.  Winver works at least as far back as win 95 and I suspect it goes back further than that.
<p>A quick way to get to the Task manager is holding down <strong>Ctrl-Shift-Esc</strong>.
<p>Here's a good one I use because the delay annoys me:  When using the start menu there is a delay between different tiers of the menu. By changing the delay value to zero you can speed up the display. This will allow the different tiers to appear instantly.
<p>1. Start Regedit. <br />2. Navigate to HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Control Panel\Desktop <br />3. Select MenuShowDelay from the list on the right. <br />4. Right on it and select Modify. <br />5. Change the value to 0 <br />6. Reboot your computer.
<p>Oh, and as always backup your registry first. :-)</p>

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I challenge you: Post your favorite tip in a blog!

by master3bs In reply to I challenge you: Post you ...
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I challenge you: Post your favorite tip in a blog!

by chobbs In reply to I challenge you: Post you ...

<p>I LOVE software tips and tricks, so thanks, Beth, for starting this blog!  </p>
<p>Here are two of my all-time favorites: WindowKey* + M to instantly minimize all open windows on my desktop.  Anyone know of a shortcut to "re-maximize" all my open windows or at least restore the windows to what they were before the global minimize?</p>
<p>And WindowKey* + E to quickly get into Windows Explorer.  </p>
<p>*WindowKey - the key with the Microsoft logo on it between the Ctrl and Alt keys.  For all my years in computers, I don't know the real name for this key!</p>
<p>C.</p>

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I challenge you: Post your favorite tip in a blog!

by gapate In reply to I challenge you: Post you ...

Right click on <u>My Computer</u> and select <u>Properties</u> to display as much and more info than entering "winver" at a command line prompt.

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I challenge you: Post your favorite tip in a blog!

by pschneider In reply to I challenge you: Post you ...

<p>Win+M -- Minimize all windows</p>
<p>Win+Shift+M -- Maximize all windows</p>
<p>Win+F -- Find files</p>
<p>Win+R -- Run command box</p>
<p>Win+D -- Desktop (does the same as Win+M)</p>
<p>Win+L -- Logoff</p>
<p>(These are others I use.)</p>

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I challenge you: Post your favorite tip in a blog!

by Ryk In reply to I challenge you: Post you ...

Chobbs - using Windows-D will toggle items minimized or restored so you
can see the desktop or restore the windows, respectively. <br />
<br />
One of my favorite tips that most people don't know is using Shift-F5
in Word to position the cursor to the last editing location when you
open a document. In one of his tech columns Jerry Pournelle, a famous
sci-fi writer, complained about not being able to do that. He'd been
using Word for many years & didn't know about the tip.  I use
it all the time. <br />
<br />
Windows-E to open Explorer is one that escapes people. It maddens me to
see them right-clicking My Computer or the Start button to explore.<br />
<br />
Another is to simply Start-->Logoff (or Shutdown) without manually
closing all open windows.  So many people think you have to close
everything first. (Obviously, save any work in progress.)  Also -
I just learned this week why some people are prompted to "Close all
Office Applications" when you log off this way;  it's because they
use Word as their email editor in Outlook.  If you deselect that
option, you don't get that annoying prompt any longer.<br />

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I challenge you: Post your favorite tip in a blog!

by chobbs In reply to I challenge you: Post you ...

<p>Thank you  PSchneider & Ryk!  Good info.  I see that this isn't a particularly active blog, but here are a couple more of my favorites anyway.  (Ryk's input brought these to mind.)</p>
<p>Ctrl+F6 inside Word or Excel (or most MS Office apps) will toggle you between open files in that app.  This even works in Crystal, which is nice.</p>
<p>Ctrl+W closes the active ("currently on top") file in most MS Office apps.</p>
<p>Alt+Tab lets you rotate (or toggle) among and between open files regardless of the application.</p>
<p>c.</p>

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Freakonomics : A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything

by Beth Blakely In reply to Musings on the TR Communi ...

I recently finished listening to the unabridged audio version of the book, <a href="em>Freakonomics">http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/006073132X/002-4536565-8311226"><em>Freakonomics : A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything</em></a>, by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner. Here's my "short and (mostly) sweet" review:<br /><br />The book is extremely interesting because of the unique questions Levitt has attempted to answer during his career as an economist. (If crack dealers make so much money, why DO they live with their mothers?) I loved the wide range of topics covered and the explanations of how the conclusions were reached. Overall, it was an entertaining read. (Or listen, in my case, as audio books help me make the most of my commute time.)<br /><br />Here's the bad part: I'm not sure I learned anything. The trick to Levitt's methods is knowing the right question(s) to ask,  finding the right set of data, and analyzing it correctly. The book did drive the "follow the incentive to find cause and effect" point home, but I'm not sure that I'm any closer to knowing where to begin.<br /><br />Perhaps the lesson should be, "Always question the conventional wisdom."<br />

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