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By OnTheRopes ·
ABC News is talking about poverty in America being greater than previously thought. Anyone here, besides me, ever live in poverty?

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An overlooked word

by maxwell edison In reply to evidently

You overlooked it intentionally; for me, it was an oversight (not using it again when I repeated myself).

The full comment:

Abject poverty - the lacking of basic human needs, such as food, water, and shelter - is practically nonexistent in the United States. Anyone in such a dire state of existence in the United States has any number of options available from which those basic human needs can and will be met; thus, abject poverty in the United States is nonexistent.

The word you conveniently (and intentionally?) overlooked: practically

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I missed 'practically' too.

by OnTheRopes In reply to An overlooked word

For some, a perhaps malformed, sense of pride keeps them from asking anyone for anything. All I wanted was a job, a chance. Found my own way, TYVM.

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Help yes, money no

by JamesRL In reply to I missed 'practically' to ...

When I was unemployed, I couldn't ask anyone for money. Not my parents or brothers, or inlaws.

But I had no problems asking my social and career network for job leads and ideas. In the end I found the jobs myself, but I was grateful for the slimmest lead.

I also didn't turn down the food charity from my wife's church, and I made sure we gave back what we got and then some when I got a job.

At my new job, I worked with the social committee and helped package and deliver food at Christmas. I saw my share of tears of joy, and proud people who were smart enough to accept, if only because the family was in need, not just the proud head of household.


James

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I try not to remember 'those' day too much.

by OnTheRopes In reply to Help yes, money no

I could use a selective memory eraser. <br>
I slept in a mobile home without any utilities on a mattress on the floor. Nothing like waking up to rats running over you. I can't really recommend it.<br>
I was at different shop doors the first thing every morning trying to get to talk to the foreman and talk myself into a job. I had one guy ask me to give him a bid to clean all of his shop windows and lights. I bid a ridiculously low price but I knew it would let me eat. He accepted and after I was done he said he liked the way that I worked and offered me a full time job. It was onward and upward from there, mostly.<br>
I think that we all have a long story to tell.<br>
One thing though, I don't feel that I owe anyone anything. Maybe that's not 'right' but that's how it is.

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I remember 'those days' all the time

by NotSoChiGuy In reply to I try not to remember 'th ...

It's my way of putting the proverbial size 12 boot into my own @ss when I need a little motivation.

I am with you, though, on not owing anyone anything; except my wife and kids, of course. I owe them everything I have to make sure they never know what any of that was like.

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NotSoChiGuy-

by OnTheRopes In reply to I try not to remember 'th ...

There's nice sense of freedom in not owing anyone anything. I also don't feel as if I own anything here, except my computer. It's all my wifes 'stuff'. (No kids of our own). I'd rather not feel that we own everything 50/50, regardless of what the law says Screw it. I did it all, bought it all, for her in the first place. My only request has been that there is always room in the refrigerator for a few bottles of my sparkling water and there is.<br>
I found out that I don't need stuff, very little anyway. I used to think differently but I've grown up.

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The bad thing

by jdclyde In reply to I missed 'practically' to ...

the harder you work to better yourself, the less assistance is available from government sources.

Rather counter productive effects on a society. Intentionally?

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no, what i saw was...

by jck In reply to An overlooked word

your absolute statement at the end:

Anyone in such a dire state of existence in the United States has any number of options available from which those basic human needs can and will be met; thus, abject poverty in the United States is nonexistent.

That's why I said what I said..."anyone" can't always get to those "options" you say make abject poverty non-existent.

Sorry, but I can find you some damn impoverished people who can't walk or bike or skateboard or steal a horse to go to the local food stamp office, can't call, and don't have a neighbor who can help.

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You missed my point entirely. Abject poverty. . . .

by maxwell edison In reply to no, what i saw was...

..... which is the state of living without the basic necessities of life: clean drinking water, adequate food, basic shelter, people dying of disease and contamination, widespread malaria and malnutrition, orphaned children roaming the streets, and so on - that's the image most likely to be conjured up when people hear about poverty statistics.

That state of abject poverty IS practically nonexistent in the United States - as well as in many developed nations around the world. We almost need a two different words to describe the two different states of living; abject poverty and relative poverty don't seem to be adequate, especially since the adjective (abject or relative) is often (or always) omitted.

The World Bank (whose goals include reducing world-wide poverty) actually list 124 nations in which some percentage of the population lives in abject poverty. The United States is not on the list; nor is your adopted home-nation of Ireland; nor are many others.

Poverty in the Congo:

http://www.childfund.org.nz/objects/version/16/20/16/162016/images/7.-topic-children-in-poverty-p10-web.jpg

Poverty in Cambodia:

http://www.pillowsforpeace.org/blog/wp-content/uploads/2008/04/village-shot.jpg

Poverty in the United States:

http://tinyurl.com/yle2wlt

Poverty in any one of the World Bank's 124 listed nations: A person survives on less than $1 per day.

Poverty in the United States: A person who earns less than $10,000 per year, or a family of eight with household income under $41,000.

http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/povdef.html

http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/threshld/thresh08.html

Thus, I stand by my comment: That state of abject poverty is nonexistent in the United States - practically or otherwise.

And I think I adequately proved my point. If you want to try to prove otherwise, knock yourself out, but do it in a rebuttal with substance and proof, not just your usual rhetoric.

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nice flip-flop

by jck In reply to You missed my point entir ...

You go from stating:

That anyone living in "abject poverty" as you defined it within the borders of the United States can get help, and that therefore makes it non-existent.

to:

The United States itself is not a state in abject poverty as a whole.

Two different points, Max.

I go back to your original statement, and say it's bull$hit.

As for your follow-up, of course the USA is not like Cambodia, Zaire, Sierra Leone, or Cote d'Ivore.

We are a civilised, industrial nation with a fully formed and operational infrastructure.

Those are third-world countries, some of whom are in the middle of long term civil war.

Nonetheless, you went from making a point about anyone in abject poverty in the USA...to pointing out we are not a nation where abject poverty is the state of our nation.

Two wholly different points.

Again, I call BS on your first point and ignore your second point because it had nothing to do with your original statement that I was pointing out the inaccuracies of.

Thanks though.

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