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By satish.talim ·
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Eclipse and JSP 2.0 Free Seminar

by satish.talim In reply to PuneJava Blog

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">Kynesys Technologies Private Limited, Pune have arranged a training session covering "Eclipse and JSP 2.0" on 10th December 2005 (Saturday) at their office. This 2 hours session is FREE and starts at 10:30 am.

This session is only for Java Developers with 1 year experience. For freshers, they are arranging another session, very soon. Registration for this Free Session is available on their</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://punejava.blogspot.com/2005/12/eclipse-and-jsp-20-free-seminar.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Ajax Mistakes

by satish.talim In reply to PuneJava Blog

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">Thinking of using the power of Ajax in your project. Make sure you avoid these mistakes.technorati tags: ajax, mistakes, web, programming, gui, interface</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://punejava.blogspot.com/2005/12/ajax-mistakes_113387660152675894.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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JBoss at Work: A Practical Guide

by satish.talim In reply to PuneJava Blog

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">O'Reilly's new book "JBoss at Work: A Practical Guide" helps you learn to build a project using extensive code examples, and delve into all the major facets of J2EE application deployment on JBoss, including JSPs, Servlets, EJBs, JMS, JNDI, web services, JavaMail, JDBC, and Hibernate.

This book will help you:

- Implement a full J2EE application and deploy it on JBoss
- Discover how to use the</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://punejava.blogspot.com/2005/12/jboss-at-work-practical-guide.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Java - a legacy software?

by satish.talim In reply to PuneJava Blog

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">Java, once considered the elite programming language, the answer to all the enterprise problems and all that. But here's a thought provoking article by Business Week which feels that Java maybe losing ground to others like the open source LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) combo, Microsoft.NET, etc. What do you think ? technorati tags: java, lamp, linux, apache, mysql, php, business week, </div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://punejava.blogspot.com/2005/12/java-legacy-software.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Java - a legacy software?

by junk99 In reply to Java - a legacy software?

<p>Java is still a great language for the experienced
developer. However, it does have a steep learning curve compared to many of the
other languages out there. Unless the IDE's make Java coding more VB like it
may continue to loose ground.</p>

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Java - a legacy software?

by jim.cotton In reply to Java - a legacy software?

<p>JAVA is an open standard with several large investments by industry experts Sun, IBM, HP. Thoses that are being lured into the .NET arena with MS are making a huge mistake. We've seen the consistent effort of MS to force 'proprietary' inroads into 'open standards' over and over. JAVA will continue to mature.</p>

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Java - a legacy software?

by macvelli In reply to Java - a legacy software?

<p>It's not clear what the big fuss about LAMP is since you can just as easily have Linux, Apache/Tomcat, MySQL, and Java as well.  PHP is great if you like scripting and what not, but a true enterprise application is either going to be .NET or Java.  If you pray to Bill Gates every day then .NET is the solution for you, otherwise there is no equal to Java.</p>

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Java - a legacy software?

by mjremijan In reply to Java - a legacy software?

<p>Java is a great technology.  I agree with the previous
post stating the learning curve is very high.  This is true, and it
doesn't get easier because then you start throwing other technologies in the
mix such as struts, tiles, hibernate, etc.  I believe this is a shame
because although you can go nuts and make an application extremely complicated
there is no reason to do so.  In general, I believe people working with
LAMP technologies have a let's-build-it attitude while Java developers have a
let's-build-it-right attitude.  The former (in my opinion) leads to
rapidly developed application which get the job done but not in the
"right" way, with "right" being things like design
patterns, code reuse, test-first development, etc.  Where as the
latter (again, in my opinion) leads to hugely complex systems because of trying
to do things "right".  For enterprise systems you need the power
and flexibility doing things "right" gives, but you shouldn't start
there.  Unfortunately, resources teaching Java technology tend to push you
there first.  I believe the Java world
would benefit from instead pushing the simpler let?s-build-it attitude.  Later, if you?re online recipe database
becomes world famous then you can worry about test-first Spring dependency
injection with an EJB business tier and hibernate persistence. </p>

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Java - a legacy software?

by pbourke In reply to Java - a legacy software?

Java, C, C++, C#............Assembly....get the job done, thats it.
Interpreted and or scripted languages do their particular well thats
why we need them. You are seeing a moves towards LAMP on mobile devices
etc ( the Motorola <a href="http://www.motorola.com/motoinfo/product/details/0,,112,00.html">E895</a> Linux based mobile <a href="http://news.inbite.com/2005/10/hello_moto_linu.html">see</a> ).There are billions of devices out there,
using many different language variants, so 'learn just one at your
PERL'. <br />
<br />
LAMP, Small Business Server ...etc are platforms that applications run
on. The language choices used to deliver applications should be
determind by
"what get the job done, on time within budget and is cost effective in
implementation and maintenance". <br />
<br />
From me programmers need to have a full language toolbox, and that
means being familiar with as many languages as possible, used across
the many different platforms. Java isnt legacy and neither is Assembly
just look at that mobile in your hand, you will find it has an OS, and
Applications each programmed in different language that was fit for
purpose.<br />
<br />
For me the JCP process means developers have some input into language
development and Java pays my bills and will do so for the next couple
of years. That doesnt mean that I ignore C#, C, C++ or Assembly my home
library is evidence of that. So as I said before 'learn just one language at
your
PERL'.

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Java - a legacy software?

by rcrathore In reply to Java - a legacy software?

Sun is paying price for ignoring the contemporary thinking such as Agile
Development, Extreme programming. It pushed for sub-standard
technologies which caused pain to developers (Entity Beans is an
example). It called dirty work-arounds as J2EE design patterns.
It forgot that Java is not greater than OOP and J2EE is not equal to
EJB. Instead of carrying forward the great language such as Java (which
was much ahead of C++ when it started), it played in hands of big
companies such as IBM, HP etc to make compromises on specifications. It
is learning from its mistakes but a lot of ground has been lost and I
think top position in programming language is vacant and it remains to
be seen what happens in next 1 or 2 years.

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