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This is just OVERFLOWING with Opportunity

By maxwell edison ·
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http://biz.yahoo.com/bizwk/050114/b3**7097mz018_1.html

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Just curious

by Cactus Pete In reply to By the way - No reference ...

Still within IT?

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Yes <EOM>

by maxwell edison In reply to Just curious
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I thought this was a humor thread

by TheChas In reply to The opportunities I'm tal ...

Max,

When I read the linked article, I thought you were starting a humor thread.

Call me a pessimist if you will, but I don't see a hydrogen economy in our lifetime.

Sure, with the government backed research funding, a few individuals will get rich off of proving that hydrogen can't cut it.
The key to making money off of this will be getting out just before the bubble bursts.

The big problem is that it takes more energy to produce hydrogen in either gas or liquid form than you get back when using it as a fuel. That's just basic chemistry and physics.

For the overall US economy, it would make a lot more sense to invest research funding on improving Bio-mass fuel sources than attempting to change the laws of physics.

With a combination of Bio-Diesel and Ethanal based fuels, the US could reach energy independence in a few years.

Of course do make that happen, we would need to stop the growth of McMansions that are chewing up our farmland. That would upset the base of Republican funding.

Then there is the problem of people producing their own fuel and avoiding the tax and regulatory structures.

This whole hydrogen economy is a diversionary tactic to keep people occupied until the oil companies are ready to reveal their plan for our future.

Chas

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Chas - No Joke

by maxwell edison In reply to I thought this was a humo ...

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You might be surprised to hear me say it, but I'm 100 percent serious. My estimated timeline might go something like this:

2005 - 2015: Primarily "drawing board" type stuff, some prototypes will be developed, and so on.

2015 - 2020: They'll be a huge surge in new automobile plants and/or retrofitting existing assembly plants. The planning and design stage for the required service stations will be in full swing.

2020 - 2030: We'll see an explosive boom in service stations and service station conversion. By 2025, alternative fuel automobiles will make up 20 percent of the vehicles on the road.

2030 - 2040: A "phase out" era for fossil fuel vehicles. By 2040, only 20 percent of the vehicles on the road will burn fossil fuel.

2040: You and I will be in the 80-90 years of age range. They'll drive us to our graves in an alternative fuel Hertz. But they won't take me until at least 2055. I'm going to reach 100, you know.

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Economic Viability

by willcomp In reply to Chas - No Joke

Alternative fuel sources for our beloved powered vehicles will come. The oil supply is finite but electricity can be produced from many souces. Eventually the cost of electrolysis or ethanol or some other power source will become economically viable due to continually rising oil prices.

LNG is not the answer. Same finite supply with escalating costs.

Fuel cells, ethanol, vegetable oil, solar panels, hybrids fueled by ethanol or vegetable oil, or some yet unexplored technology will prove the most cost efficient and will win.

Want to get wealthy? Develop a low cost, high capacity battery that has a range of 1000 miles per charge in a mid-sized sedan.

I wouldn't put my complete faith in H2 at this point. But fuel cells look promising. However; large utilities, auto makers, chemical companies, and probably other large corporations have been researching and developing fuel cells for years. If they prove viable, the big boys will just shift gears.

Dalton

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I agree with you, that is the first thing I thought of

by Garion11 In reply to The opportunities I'm tal ...

A new industry being born with emphais on technology and practicality. Ok folks I am off to buy a Gas (Hydrogen gas) station, wish me luck!

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How Refreshing.....

by faith_michele In reply to The opportunities I'm tal ...

To see a post that focuses on opportunities. I agree that we should look for them every chance that we get. I saw your timeline, but who is going to start the ball rolling? Do you think that the auto industry will embrace this? or Do you see this coming from new companies?

The reason that I ask these questions that might be perceived as "stupid" is that I am new to IT. I have heard of some companies looking at alternatives to fuel and the progress made in the auto industry in relation to smart cars.

Another aspect of IT that I believe has opened up is in the area of identity. With all the HIPPA requirement deadlines approaching, I have seen some solutions, but not one that is simple and totally secure. A person in my college class said that she works for a hospital and had a doctor say to her that he is not able to remember passwords because he has other more important things to remember. It is just a thought and I could be wrong.

If I am, please let me know. My skin is pretty thick.

Thanks,
Faith

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Necessity truly is the Mother of Invention

by maxwell edison In reply to How Refreshing.....

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The world currently consumes over 80 million barrels of oil each and every day. At the current rates of increase, it's estimated that the demand will exceed 120 million barrels by 2030, an increase of 50 percent. And if anything, that's probably an underestimation, not an overestimation. Moreover, it's becoming more expensive to locate new oil fields and extract the oil once it's found. To keep up with the current rise in demand, the United States, for example, will have to invest (either private investment or with public funds) over three trillion dollars in the coming decades just to find and extract the oil necessary to keep up with rising demands. And that's just in the United States. China is becoming the next "oil hog", and other industrialized nations aren't exactly reducing their demand either. Throw in the uncertainty that is inherent in dealing with the middle-east, and there are more questions than answers.

You'll hear advocates on one side of the spectrum claiming that the supply of available oil is almost exhausted. You'll find advocates on the other side of the argument claim that there's enough to last for decades to come. It's probably a good guess that the truth lies somewhere in-between. One thing is certain, however; the amount is indeed finite, and it's getting more expensive -- and more politically difficult -- to extract. And considering that the current levels of world-wide production are either at or near 100 percent capacity, it's inevitable that the demand will soon exceed the available supply, and that the days of "cheap oil" are rapidly coming to an end.

If American business is going to invest three trillion dollars in the coming decades, they want their return to be more long-term than the finite supply of oil would provide. The time is rapidly approaching that those investment choices will be made in technologies other than oil production.

But all this is both good news and bad news. The bad news is as I described above. The good news is that mankind is a very creative creature, and we have always been able to figure a way out of these kinds of problems. And if necessity truly is the mother of invention, then opportunity is the offspring that results.

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Your "area of identity"

by maxwell edison In reply to How Refreshing.....

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That is an absolutely outstanding example of how someone thinks of Information Technology as a problem-solving tool for a specific purpose. Think like a doctor; understand a doctor's problems; and apply your IT skills to solve that problem.

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And by the way - for people who think

by maxwell edison In reply to How Refreshing.....

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For people who think that this scenario is "too much, too fast", and that such a transformation couldn't possibly take place in the short span of twenty to thirty years, just ask yourself one thing.

How many people, in 1975, had a personal computer, and how many have them today?

Watch out, a rocket of opportunity is about to take off.

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