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Water on the moon.

By boxfiddler Moderator ·
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/33918160/ns/technology_and_science-space

"The presence of significant quantities of ice on the lunar surface catapults the moon from an interesting waypoint to a critical launching pad for humanity's exploration of the cosmos," said Peter Diamandis, CEO and chairman of the X Prize Foundation, which is running a $30 million contest for private moon rovers. "We're entering a new era of lunar exploration ? 'Moon 2.0,' in which an international group of companies and governments will use the ice and other unique resources of the moon to help us expand the sphere of human influence, and to help us monitor and protect the Earth."

My thoughts are all over the place with this one. The most prevalent reeks of incongruity. We don't manage our own planet well.

Corporate interests (business!) exploit well and are probably best capable of getting us 'out there'. Yet those same interests appear blind to the devastating effect of their expertise.

We're known for short-sightedness, we humans. Despite my 'Oh, this is way too cool' initial response, I have misgivings.

What do y'all think about ice on the moon? Will we go there and do that?

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Antarctica

by Ed Woychowsky In reply to Water in form of Ice

Too many treaties for any one group to lay claim to Antarctica. The same is probably true for Luna, too. But there's always the "try and stop us defense," or "we're there and you're not, phbbt!" defense.

The advantage is that from 250,000 miles up it would be hard for someone from Earth to sneak up on you. The opposite is true of Antarctica, no clear view of all of the paths.

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No Nukes in Space Treaty

by BFilmFan In reply to Antarctica

The Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies explicitly forbids any government from claiming a celestial resource such as the Moon or a planet, since they are the Common heritage of mankind.

Article II of the Treaty states that "outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, is not subject to national appropriation by claim of sovereignty, by means of use or occupation.

Nations which have ratified the treaty is up at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Outer_Space_Treaty.png.

All of the major nations are signatories.

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Worthless treaties

by Ed Woychowsky In reply to No Nukes in Space Treaty

Didn't you pay attention in history class, treaties are only kept when convienant. The moment that there is any kind of advantage to breaking it, it's broken.

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Notable Omission

by NotSoChiGuy In reply to No Nukes in Space Treaty

I didn't see that any multi-nationals had signed onto the treaty.

If the first ship to use lunar resources is named 'The Nostromo', I won't be the least bit surprised!

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The water in Antarctica

by seanferd In reply to Water in form of Ice

is still at the bottom of the same gravity well as the rest of us.

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Yes water on the moon

by Michael Jay In reply to Water on the moon.

In a crater that has never seen sunlight, not unlikely at all.

More likely would be water in the moon, that will have to wait till we get there and do a full geological survey of the moon, for now a small amount of actual data available is here.

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2009/13nov_lcrossresults.htm

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