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Information Technologies industry in North Carolina

by wooran In reply to Wooran's Web World Develo ...

NCTA is the primary voice of the Information Technologies industry in North Carolina. NCTA is dedicated to growing and strengthening the IT industry through increasing public awareness and influencing key public policy issues. We provide our members the opportunity to network with other industry leaders, share information on critical technologies, and promote their companies. <a href="http://www.nc-tech.org">Learn more!


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Email feedback to wooran@ec.rr.com<p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://woorans.blogspot.com/2005/05/information-technologies-industry-in.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Demise of a hard-fighting squad

by wooran In reply to Wooran's Web World Develo ...

<a href="http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7823375/">
Marines who survived ambush are killed, wounded in blast</a><br>
By Ellen Knickmeyer<br>
Updated: 4:38 a.m. ET May 12, 2005<br>

HABAN, Iraq, May 11 - <br>The explosion enveloped the armored vehicle in flames, sending orange balls of fire bubbling above the trees along the Euphrates River near the Syrian border. <a href="http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7823375/"> more ?</a>

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Email feedback to wooran@ec.rr.com<p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://woorans.blogspot.com/2005/05/demise-of-hard-fighting-squad.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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THE MOUSE THAT ATE THE PUBLIC DOMAIN:

by wooran In reply to Wooran's Web World Develo ...

<a href="http://writ.news.findlaw.com/commentary/20020305_sprigman.htmlf">
Disney, The Copyright Term Extension Act, And eldred V. Ashcroft</a><br>
By CHRIS SPRIGMAN<br>


Unless you earn your living as an intellectual property lawyer, you probably don't know that the Supreme Court has granted certiorari in Eldred v. Ashcroft, a case that will test the limits of Congress's power to extend the term of copyrights. But while copyright may not seem inherently compelling to non-specialists, the issues at stake in Eldred are vitally important to anyone who watches movies, listens to music, or reads books.

If that includes you, read on.<br>
<a href="http://writ.news.findlaw.com/commentary/20020305_sprigman.html">
Mickey Mouse Goes to Washington<br>
</a><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://woorans.blogspot.com/2005/05/mouse-that-ate-public-domain.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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KnowledgeNews :: Your Home for Learning on the Web:

by wooran In reply to Wooran's Web World Develo ...

<img src="http://knowledgenews.net/moxie/moxiepix/a687.jpg">

<span style="font-weight:bold;">"Luke, I told you to do your science homework!"<br></span>

He's baaaack! Unless you've been living in a galaxy far, far away, you've probably heard that the final installment of Star Wars opened just after midnight on Thursday--28 years after Darth Vader and Co. first flashed across the silver screen. All over America, die-hard fans waited in huge lines to see Episode III: Revenge of the Sith at early morning showings.
<br>
We love a science fiction thrill as much as anyone, but we can't help noticing that, in Hollywood, the fiction often gets the better of the science. So, to restore balance to the media force, we're sending some simple science correctives. (Just don't blurt them out during the show!
<br>

<span style="font-weight:bold;">Today's Knowledge<br>
The Top 5 Science Fiction Foul-Ups
<br></span>

Every science fiction movie has them: stupendous scenes of movie magic that sacrifice science on the altar of special effects. Here are our top 5 science fiction foul-ups--common movie scenes where science takes a holiday so we can get our fix of big-screen thrills.
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<span style="font-weight:bold;">1. No Ear Plugs Necessary</span>
<br>
The Scene: The big impressive spaceship flies across the screen, emitting an equally impressive rumble of powerful engine noise. Or maybe just that really cool TIE fighter howl.
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The Problem: These ships are moving in space, which is a vacuum, and sound can't travel in a vacuum. It takes matter to propagate the energy waves that we perceive as sound. So the sound of any ship in space is the sound of silence. (Call it the Garfunkel Effect.)
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2. This One's a Dud</span>
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The Scene: A deadly firefight in space rages until someone goes down in flames, complete with incredible explosion and massive ball of fire.
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The Problem: Most explosions are based on combustion, a chemical reaction that requires oxygen to take place. Of course, there's no oxygen in space. You can't even light a match out there, let alone set off stunning fireworks displays.
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<span style="font-weight:bold;">3. Think Jellyfish</span>
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The Scene: Our heroes enter a seedy space bar, full of strange alien life forms. Yet chances are they've got tables and chairs at which to nurse a beer, because the aliens look, and sit, pretty much like us.
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The Problem: Our own little corner of the cosmos sports life in all shapes and sizes. Of the millions of species on Earth, only a small fraction look much like us. The odds that the bar crowd on completely different worlds would evolve to look like we do are pretty slim.
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<span style="font-weight:bold;">4. Set Phasers on "Slow"</span>
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The Scene: Science fiction's chosen weapon is the laser. Phaser, blaster, whatever you want to call it--it's a blast of energy fired from a gun. Whether it's dueling ships or dueling pistols, the bad guys get their due in a blaze of beams flashing across the screen.
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The Problem: The energy in these weapons doesn't behave like real energy. Energy travels at the speed of light--far too fast for your eyes to follow it in beautiful blue and red beams.
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<span style="font-weight:bold;">5. "I'm Going Retro!"</span>
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The Scene: Squadrons of starfighters duel in a dogfight that puts Top Gun to shame. Inevitably, somebody gets a bad guy on his tail, desperately declares he "can't shake 'em," and, well, see #2.
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The Problem: Spacecraft don't fly like planes. Because space is a vacuum, there's no need to maintain "lift," and no "drag" to slow you down once you get going. A starfighter in a dogfight could easily use retro rockets to spin around in mid-flight and blast the guy behind him, all while "vectoring" in the original direction.
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Christopher Call and Michael Himick<br>
May 18, 2005<br>

Want to learn more?<br>
<a href="http://www.sfhomeworld.org/">Visit the Science Fiction Museum and Hall of Fame<br></a>
http://www.sfhomeworld.org/<br><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://woorans.blogspot.com/2005/05/knowledgenews-your-home-for-learning.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Stanford Accelerator Uncovers Archimedes' Text

by wooran In reply to Wooran's Web World Develo ...

<a href="http://science.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=05/05/21/230208&from=rss">
Posted by timothy on Sunday May 22, @12:49AM</a>
from the 2-quarts-olive-oil-1-bunch-grapes-goat-milk dept.<a href="http://www.newsday.com/news/science/wire/sns-ap-archimedes-manuscript,0,5175576.story?coll=sns-ap-science-headlines">
AI Playground points to a Newsday.com report which reads in part "A particle accelerator is being used to reveal the long-lost writings of the Greek mathematician Archimedes, </a>work hidden for centuries after a Christian monk wrote over it in the Middle Ages. Highly focused X-rays produced at the <a href="http://www.slac.stanford.edu/">Stanford Linear Accelerator Center</a> were used last week to begin deciphering the parts of the 174-page text that have not yet been revealed." <a href="http://science.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=05/05/21/230208&from=rss">more ?</a><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://woorans.blogspot.com/2005/05/stanford-accelerator-uncovers.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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For Japanese Math Wizards, It's a Mind Game

by wooran In reply to Wooran's Web World Develo ...

<a href="http://www.jamsportland.com/files/washington_post.asp">The Washington Post<br>
By Ginny Parker, Dec 15, 2000<br></a>

For Japanese Math Wizards, It's a Mind Game; Contestants Test Skill on Invisible
Abacus<br>

The contestants sit hunched over bare tables, some in sweat shirts, some in
neckties. A small audience watches quietly, while judges pace the floor.<br>

Suddenly, a teenager's had shoots up and shout breaks the silence. "Done!" he
calls out, and passes his answer sheet to a moderator.<br>

Within seconds, Hiroaki Tsuchiya has multiplied in his head a list of numbers
that would make an accountant's head spin. How does he do it? On an imaginary
abacus, just as merchants, students and others have done throughout Asia for
centuries.<br>

Today, despite computers and calculators, the technique survives as a strenuous
workout for the brain. Teachers say almost anyone can master it, although it
takes hours of practice, mental dexterity and extraordinary powers of
concentration.<br>

"If you space out, you lose," said Tsuchiya, who at age 13 recently became the
youngest winner of a Kyoto tournament where Japan's best mental mathematicians
display their amazing feats.<br>

Tsuchiya, for example, takes only a few moments to figure out the quotient of
992.587318 divided by 5,647.723.<br> <a href="http://www.jamsportland.com/files/washington_post.asp">more ?</a><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://woorans.blogspot.com/2005/05/for-japanese-math-wizards-its-mind.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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LLNL?s ?Science Week? festivities
celebrate World Year of Physics

by wooran In reply to Wooran's Web World Develo ...

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">Computer simulation of the gravitational radiation from the head-on collision of two black holes at a time just after the collision. The different colors represent the different strengths of the gravitational wave signal. Techniques for detecting gravitational waves, which are predicted by Einstein?s theory of general relativity, will be discussed during a Science Day talk by Barry Barish of the California Institute of Technology.</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://woorans.blogspot.com/2005/05/llnls-science-week-festivities.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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MSN Virtual Earth To Take On Google Earth

by wooran In reply to Wooran's Web World Develo ...

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Micrsoft sends news today that founder Bill Gates has announced a MSN Virtual Earth service is to debut in the summer. The service is promised to provide:

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Satellite images with 45-degree-angle views of buildings and neighborhoods
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Satellite images with street map overlays
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Ability to add local data layers, such as showing local businesses or restaurants
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The service will allow users to choose from a number of different data types plus allow people to contribute their own information. The announcement came today at the D3 conference happening this week. <br>Last week, Google announced that its Keyhole software allowing satellite views of the Earth will be renamed Google Earth. Better images will also be available to those getting satellite views via Google Maps. In addition, Google Maps has also been getting enhanced by others adding on data from other sources. More on this in is covered in our Google Factory Tour Recap post.

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So, the planned Microsoft service will help MSN compete against some Google gains in this area, not to mention moves others like Yahoo have been making with maps. Some past reading you may find interesting on these topics:

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Google Maps Not In Google Search; Comparing Services & How Do They Do That?
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Satellite/Aerial Images Plus Local Info
This post discusses TerraFly. This service has been available for more than five years and receives funding from IBM. Terrafly offers several of the services that MSN plans to provide including street overlays and local business info.
Super Cool: Interact With Satellite and Aerial Images With NASA's World Wind Program
<br>Global in scope. World Wind Central (a wiki) offers links to interesting images that users have found. <br>
Just Mrap It!
<br><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://woorans.blogspot.com/2005/05/msn-virtual-earth-to-take-on-google.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Computers Seized in Data-Theft Probe

by wooran In reply to Wooran's Web World Develo ...

<a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/05/19/AR2005051900704.html?referrer=email">Federal Investigators Remove PCs, Discs From Several Locations; LexisNexis Break-In Linked to Paris Hilton Phone Hacking
</a>
By Brian Krebs<br>
washingtonpost.com Staff Writer<br>
Thursday, May 19, 2005; 6:16 PM<br>

The federal investigation into the massive theft of sensitive personal records from database giant LexisNexis Inc. intensified this week with the execution of search warrants and seizure of evidence from several individuals across the country, according to federal law enforcement officials.
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Three people targeted in the investigation confirmed that federal investigators had served warrants at their homes. The group included a minor who has been in contact with a washingtonpost.com reporter for three months and who said he was directly involved in the LexisNexis breach.<br> <a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/05/19/AR2005051900704.html?referrer=email">more ?</a><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://woorans.blogspot.com/2005/05/computers-seized-in-data-theft-probe.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Nextel is a major player in the market and enjoys tremendous popularity.

by wooran In reply to Wooran's Web World Develo ...

From wholesalers Parnell-Martin (Charlotte, N.C.) and Hughes Supply (Orlando, Fla.) and from Miami-based wholesalers Bond Supply and Lehman Pipe & Plumbing Supply, to Home Depot Supply ? each of them said they had at least one Nextel product.

?We understand the construction and distribution business,? says Henry Popplewell, Nextel?s vice president of distribution and transportation. ?They are two of the backbone industries in our organization. We have worked together as partners and evolved together developing solutions for more than 10 years now.?

According to Kent Lee, Charlotte, N.C. complex manager for wholesaler Parnell-Martin, ?Nextel has had good growth and profits along with good people. They give us the basic blocking and tackling tools we need.?<p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://woorans.blogspot.com/2005/05/nextel-is-major-player-in-market-and.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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