Linux

General discussion

Locked

Configuring NIC

By cvivek ·
Hi,
With regard to the earlier mail for configuring NIC cards on Sun E250 Server, I need the steps for configuring the 2nd NIC card and binding them.

Regards,
Vivek

Hi All,
I have to configure a NIC in my Solaris E250 Server. The Server has 2 NIC cards. One is configured to 10.10... series.
I need some help on configuring the second Card to 192.... series.
Pl help me its urgent.
regards,
Vivek

This conversation is currently closed to new comments.

Thread display: Collapse - | Expand +

All Comments

Collapse -

Configuring NIC

by cpfeiffe In reply to Configuring NIC

If you are using regular 10/100 MB ethernet your first card is probably the on board connection and is identified as hme0. You can verify this with 'ifconfig -a' to see what interfaces are active. You're second NIC will then most likely be hme1. If that is the case you can activate it immediately without rebooting by typing 'ifconfig hme1 plumb;ifconfig hme1 inet 192.x.x.x netmask x.x.x.x broadcast x.x.x.x up'. Of course you'll have to replace the x's with appropriate entries. Then to makeit permanent (so it is active after each reboot) you'll need to put a host name for that IP address in /etc/inet/hosts, create a /etc/hostname.hme1 file that contains only that hostname and add the network and netmask to /etc/netmasks.

Good luck.

Collapse -

Configuring NIC

by cvivek In reply to Configuring NIC

Poster rated this answer

Collapse -

Configuring NIC

by ghislain.levesque In reply to Configuring NIC

The Sun Adapters with local MAC addresses (machine access code) have
addresses encoded in the Fcode Prom. The local-mac-address property in eeprom
is used to enable this feature.
ok local-mac-address?
(Defaults to false = use system defined mac address).
This can be set for true, which allows network drivers to use their own MAC
address, not the system default. For use with the QFE (QuadFastEthernet)
or newer ethernet NIC's listed above.
or from the eeprom on the command line
# eeprom local-mac-address?=true
Section 3.2.3(4) of the IEEE 802.3 spec defines a reserved bit in the Ethernet
Address that can be used to administer a universally assigned ethernet
addresses. A Locally administered address (LAA) can be implemented to ensure
a unique HW address.
Setting the LAA bit can be done by using a 0A hex (second bit set 1010, add 2)
as the first digit instead of 08 (1000). 8:00:20 is Sun's universal
assignment. (1010) a:00:20 would be local administer address.
The first bit is "individual/group" bit and used by multicasting (1001 = 09,
odd number) and should be avoided.
Use the ifconfig "ether" option if this is needed on a NIC that do not implement local-mac-address.
examples( use for qe, le and hme devices ):
ifconfig -a shows that hme0 is 8:0:20:77:dc:7b
Command to change ether number on additional

Collapse -

Configuring NIC

by ghislain.levesque In reply to Configuring NIC

Command to change ether number on additional hme interfaces:
(using first 3 bytes of 0a:0:20 and last 3 bytes of host-assigned address)
ifconfig hme1 ether 0a:0:20:77:dc:7b
ifconfig hme2 ether 0c:0:20:77:dc:7b

sequencial numbering:
ifconfig hme1 ether 0a:0:20:00:00:1
ifconfig hme2 ether 0a:0:20:00:00:2

numbering scheme based on part of IP address
( ex: hme1 =192.9.200.2 hme2 = 192.9.200.16
Using 0a:0:20 for first 3 bytes and last 3 octets of IP number):
ifconfig hme1 ether 0a:0:20:09:c8:2
ifconfig hme2 ether 0a:0:20:09:c8:10

This change can be permenantly added to /etc/rc2.d/S72inetsvc
(/etc/init.d/inetsvc startup script) or a new script created.

A sometimes crude method is to ping the broadcast address and randomly choose a
number
that is not being used on the network. in the form of 8:0:20:XX:XX:XX

Notes: Do not use an odd number ( ex: "09:") for the first byte due to the
fact that if you are implementing multicasting, the 1st bit transmitted
("individual/group" bit) of a 1 represents a multicast address.

see INFODOC I 15572 SYNOPSIS: Can I configure two Ethernet interfaces on
the subnet?

Additional note: For Security and network isolation. You can set ip_forwarding
off and ip_strict_dst_multihoming on, if you are trying to prevent access to
the other interfaces.

ndd /dev/ip ip_forwarding Determines if the workstation will route packets.
ndd /dev/ip ip_strict_dst_multihoming Determines whether to use Strict
Destination Multihoming. If this variable is set to True, and ip_forwarding is
turned off, then the machine will not except packets destined for a different
interface. (RFC1122)

Collapse -

Configuring NIC

by ghislain.levesque In reply to Configuring NIC

To determine if local-mac-address is implemented, use prtconf to examine
local-mac-address value.
( for on-board le or hme = host assigned HW address)
$ prtconf -pv |grep idprom
idprom:
01800800.208d7e88.00000000.8d7e88a9.00000000.00000000.00000000.00000000
^^^^^^^^^^^^^
(the new nic's have unique addresses, qfe example)
$ prtconf -pv |grep local-mac-address
local-mac-address?: 'true'
local-mac-address: 0800208d.7828
local-mac-address: 0800208d.7829
local-mac-address: 0800208d.782a
local-mac-address: 0800208d.782b

Collapse -

Configuring NIC

by cvivek In reply to Configuring NIC

I was able to configure the NIC cards using the help of the suggestions.

Collapse -

Configuring NIC

by cvivek In reply to Configuring NIC

This question was closed by the author

Related Discussions

Related Forums