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Dreaming Electric Sheep

By jasonhiner Moderator ·
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Google GDrive ... bring it on, and the sooner the better

by shamusoneil06 In reply to Google GDrive ... bring i ...

I'd use it.  Looks nifty.        

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Are you working more hours than you did five years ago?

by jasonhiner Moderator In reply to Dreaming Electric Sheep

<p>This week's TechRepublic poll asks whether IT pros are working more hours, less hours, or about the same number of hours as they were five years ago (you can log your response to the <a href="http://techrepublic.com.com">poll</a> at the bottom of the TechRepublic front page, if you haven't already responded). </p>
<p>In my experience, a lot of IT pros seem to be working longer hours because their departments have been squeezed over the last several years due to cost-cutting. That has meant less staff members to do the same workload, and in other places the IT department's workload has grown without increasing the staff. </p>
<p>As a companion to this week's poll, we've also started a <a href="http://techrepublic.com.com/5208-6230-0.html?forumID=6&threadID=190901&start=0">discussion thread</a> for TechRepublic members to discuss their workload increase or decrease over the past five years. So far, the majority have said they are working more. One of my favorite responses among the current posts came from <a href="http://techrepublic.com.com/5213-6257-0.html?id=4016019&redirectTo=%2f1320-22-20.html">amcol</a>, who said "You can put a smile on your face or a dollar in your wallet, and it's tough to do both at the same time. I'll take the smile." </p>
<p><strong>So are <em>you</em> working more or less than five years ago? </strong><a href="strong>Join">http://techrepublic.com.com/5208-6230-0.html?forumID=6&threadID=190901&start=0"><strong>Join the discussion</strong></a><strong>.</strong> </p>

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What is the worst blunder you have made during your IT career?

by jasonhiner Moderator In reply to Dreaming Electric Sheep

<p>Over the years, we've had a lot of fun in the TechRepublic forums talking about the <a href="http://techrepublic.com.com/5138-10877-6040785.html">blunders and silly things that end users do and say</a>. Now, we're turning the tables a bit and asking IT pros to tell about the worst blunder they have ever made in their IT work. This can include everything from config errors that took down critical systems to purchasing the wrong stuff. </p>
<p>I'll say this ... almost all of the bad blunders that I've ever made have come when I've tried to attack a problem too quickly, rather than thinking through all of the steps and potential outcomes <em>before</em> embarking on any potential fix. This has resulted in BSODs on Windows boxes, stopping network daemons on UNIX servers in the middle of a business day, and crashing a critical Exchange mail server. Ahhhh the memories. </p>
<p><a href="strong>Join">http://techrepublic.com.com/5208-6230-0.html?forumID=5&threadID=191049&start=0"><strong>Join the discussion and tell us your worst blunder</strong></a>.</p>

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What is the worst blunder you have made during your IT career?

by Mr. Hardware In reply to What is the worst blunder ...

<p>Ahhhhh, as you say rushing it is ALWAYS the problem. Here's mine; this desktop had a blown HDD, it was due to upg the MB any way. So, new MB, new HDD, fire it up, windows loads corretly, everything else is well. When it come time to copy the old files to the new spare HDD . . . Wa? Windows doent see it. Tried reboot, checking boot.ini, everything you could think of. The moral . . . CHECK TO SEE IF YOU PLUGED THE POWER BACK TO THE HARDDRIVE, it will save you a hour-and-a-half! ;-)</p>

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Latest screenshots of the new UI in Office 2007

by jasonhiner Moderator In reply to Dreaming Electric Sheep

<p>Today Microsoft released some new screenshots of the revamped UI for Microsoft Office 2007. I've put together an <a href="strong>image">http://techrepublic.com.com/2300-10877-6048111.html"><strong>image gallery</strong></a> of the new screenshots and included some other recent Office 2007 images to provide a fuller look at what to expect. As mentioned before, this will be the most drastically redesigned interface in the history of the product. It has the potential to cause a lot of confusion among end users (and cause headaches for IT support), but it sure looks cool and power users will probably love the power and flexibility of the new UI. <br /><br /><a href="img">http://techrepublic.com.com/2300-10877-6048111.html"><img alt="Office 2007 ui" src="http://techrepublic.com.com/i/tr/gallery/office_2007_interface/office2007_thumbnail.jpg" /></a></p>

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Data shows that in 2005 IT employment surged back to 2001 levels

by jasonhiner Moderator In reply to Dreaming Electric Sheep

<p>After absorbing heavy losses in 2002 and 2003, IT employment in the U.S. started picking back up in 2004 and the trend accelerated in the second half of 2005 to the point that the numbers finally exceeded the highs from 2001, according to the January 2006 <a href="http://www.trinetsystems.com/newsletter/Feb06/IT_Employment_Returns.pdf">report</a> from the National Association of Computer Consultant Businesses (NACCB). </p>
<p>Mark Roberts, CEO of NACCB, said, "In light of the downward pressure on IT employment following Y2K, the bursting of the Tech Bubble, the 9/11 terrorist attacks and the 2001 recession, I am heartened by the 2005 employment figures evidencing strong employment growth in IT"</p>
<p>The NACCB recorded IT employment at 3,527,100 in 2001. By 2002 that number had sunk to 3,339,500 and it didn't get much better in 2003. As the chart below shows, IT emploment got rolling again in 2004 and then in 2005 finally rebounded to the 2001 levels. </p>
<p><img alt="" src="http://i.i.com.com/cnwk.1d/i/tr/jason/naccb_timeline.jpg" /> </p>
<p>And the NACCB's <a href="http://www.naccb.org/employment-index/january2006_it_release.pdf">February 2006 numbers</a> show that IT employment grew again in January, which has the trendline for 2006 looking strong. </p>
<p><img alt="" src="http://i.i.com.com/cnwk.1d/i/tr/jason/naccb_012006.jpg" /></p>

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Data shows that in 2005 IT employment surged back to 2001 levels

by Daniel.news.it In reply to Data shows that in 2005 I ...

<p>I hope Spain takes same way!!!!!!</p>
<p> </p>

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Are cubicles evil?

by jasonhiner Moderator In reply to Dreaming Electric Sheep

<p>One of the most popular articles zipping around the Internet last week and being posted across various social networking sites was the FORTUNE Magazine piece "<a href="http://money.cnn.com/2006/03/09/magazines/fortune/cubicle_howiwork_fortune/index.htm">Cubicles: The great mistake</a>," which recounts the infamous history of the cubicle from its creation by Bob Probst, a researcher, in 1968 to its current loathing by many modern knowledge workers. </p>
<p>The most interesting thing about the article is the story of Probst. In all reality, we probably shouldn't blame him for the cubicle, because he later repented for his corporate sins. If Probst didn't design the cubicle for the suits at the time, they would have found someone else to do it. What Probst quickly realized once his original design got shrunk down to size, was that companies were simply looking to squeeze as many workers as possible into a small space that could be easily reconfigured at any time (although cubicle layouts are rarely ever reconfigured). Any naive notions of employee productivity and a pleasing work environment were trumped by the bottom line that cubicles save companies a LOT of money. (And that's why they probably won't go away any time soon either.)  </p>
<p>Interestingly, Probst's original design, called the "Action Office," was pretty altruistic. It was meant to give workers more counter space to spread out their work and be able to look at it holistically. It was also aimed at having different levels of counters, including some where employees could occasionally stand up and work to promote better blood flow and overall physical health. However, the cubicle was eventually shrunk down to size and deployed in large numbers throughout Corporate America. Probst later lamented the rapid spread of the cubicle, referring to it as "monolithic insanity." </p>
<p>Nevertheless, its spread continues. There will be over $3 billion worth of cubicles sold this year, continuing the reign of cubes as the leader of the office furniture market. </p>
<p>So what's the good and bad of cubes? Here's my quick rundown:</p>
<p>The <strong>GOOD</strong>:</p>
<ul>
<li>Cheap
<li>Inexpensive
<li>Low cost
<li>Did I mention that they cost less than offices?
<li>They promote collaboration and interaction among teams
<li>Managers can monitor workers more easily</li></ul>
<p>The <strong>BAD</strong>:</p>
<ul>
<li>Confidentially issues can come into play for sensitive documents and phone calls
<li>Productivity can suffer when workers distract each other
<li>Workers sometimes feel more paranoid and self-conscious</li></ul>
<p>What do you think about cubicles? Does your organization use them? Do you think technology is easier or more difficult to support in cubicles? </p>
<p>By the way, I wrote this from a temporary cubicle that I occupy when I travel to the CNET Networks office in Louisville. </p>

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Are cubicals evil?

by Justin Fielding In reply to Are cubicles evil?

Yuck!  We don't have cubicles here in the UK (or not within any company I have worked for in the past)--we tend to favor a more 'open plan' office.

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Are cubicals evil?

by GSG In reply to Are cubicles evil?

<p>Cubicles can be a good alternative in some cases.  For example, we were very limited in the amount of office space we had, and so, took over 1 large room to house 4 of us on one tem in 4 cubes.  They never bought the cubes, and moved others in on us, so we had 9 people housed in a space meant for 4 people.  It was all open desks.  Needless to say, I got my giant 21" monitors (pre-flat panel) on the desks, and set up my testing workstations around me, until I had built a fort.  I then booby-trapped the entrance to my fort with "Franken-PC", a cobbled together PC without a case.  They were scared of Franken-PC and left me alone.</p>
<p>They are bad when they are used as an excuse to save money.  When I have to be on an hour-long call, it's impossible to hold a handset that long while typing and taking notes.  Headsets don't work that well either.  I'm very thankful for my little 8x10 office complete with ceiling and closed door.</p>

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