Hardware

CES 2014: Lenovo talks up $799 4K monitor that works with existing computers

When TechRepublic interviewed Lenovo executive Tom Butler at CES 2014, we got the details of Lenovo's 28-inch 4K monitor that costs $799 and doesn't require a special PC to run it.
   

At CES 2014, TechRepublic and ZDNet interviewed Lenovo's Tom Butler, Director of Portfolio Strategy for the Americas, and one of our favorite topics was Lenovo's newly-announced 4K computer monitor. We had Tom surrounded with Bill Detwiler, Ryan Huang from ZDNet Asia, and yours truly, but he was a great sport. 

Watch this three-minute video clip where Butler talks about not one but two 28-inch 4K displays that Lenovo announced at CES. The first one is a $799 monitor aimed at professionals. The second is a prosumer display that is not just a 28-inch monitor but also includes three HDMI ports for adding other devices and includes Android so that you can use it as a large touchscreen or even an all-in-one Android PC if you connect a keyboard and mouse via Bluetooth. It carries an $1199 price tag.  Both sport a screen resolution of 3840x2160 and will be available during the first half of 2014.

Also, Dell announced a 4K monitor at CES that comes in at $699 and will be available on January 23.

lenovo-4k-ces2014.jpg
Lenovo's ThinkVision Pro2840m 4K2K monitor, announced at CES 2014
 Image: Jason Hiner/TechRepublic

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About

Jason Hiner is Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He writes about the people, products, and ideas changing how we live and work in the 21st century. He's co-author of the upcoming book, Follow the Geeks (bit.ly/ftgeeks).

9 comments
Eamon_Walsh1
Eamon_Walsh1

Lenovo doesn't need a PC connection set of gadgetry to run its product? Whoa? Happy Thanksgiving, this! bit.ly/1z5wkBK

pivert
pivert

Completely off topic: Jason, get rid of that ugly cap. It doesn't suit you. And for some reason I find it impolite / arrogant towards the person you are interviewing. If you want to make something your trademark, a baker boy cap is sooooo wrong. What's that Mr. Holmes... ?

frylock
frylock

These monitors sound nice from a photo editing standpoint, as long as they'll have wide-gamut color and adjustable LUTs for calibrating. I suppose that's too much to ask though, despite that "aimed at professionals" tag.

greggwon
greggwon

The issue with 4k will be whether manufactures want to sell product, or reap profit.  Initially, there are startup costs, as well weak product support issues for being too early to market.   If you get the product right from the start, instead of selling 2-3 high priced, beta products, then you can hit the ground running.  Hardware manufactures in the PC market place are plagued with the "first to market" mantra, instead of looking at how to be "the best in the marketplace".  Apple always strives for best value in the market place, by including the whole notion of product support in their pricing.  So, you can carry your Apple product into the Apple store and get one on one support to get problems solved, instead of spending a week full of evenings, googling on the internet, trying to find someone else who has had the same problem and has a zero cost "fix" for you.  Product warranty and support is a value many people will pay extra for.

adornoe
adornoe

The Dell and Lenovo "monitors" begin to sound puny and expensive, when one considers that, Polaroid will be coming out with a 50 inch 4k TV, for $999. 

jmwbowen
jmwbowen

@adornoe There seems to be an assumption that cost should be directly proportional to screen size and that larger screen size is always better.


There's a BIG difference between a monitor and a TV. TVs are meant to be viewed from many feet away. Monitors are viewed from just a few feet away. What person would want a 50 inch screen a few feet from their face as they tried to work?


The DPI is greater on smaller screens, so the 28" screen will appear sharper than the 50" screen, even though they have the same resolution. This is why I went out of my way to choose the smallest reasonably priced 1920x1080 monitors I could find, not the biggest.

peter891
peter891

@jmwbowen@adornoeI find two 24" monitors with 1920x1024/1600 are about right for comfortable desktop work using standard font sizes.  For 4k a 48" monitor would be just fine - and when not working I could use it as an office TV.

dogknees
dogknees

@jmwbowen @adornoe  "What person would want a 50 inch screen a few feet from their face as they tried to work?" Me for one! Happy to work close if it means I see more detail rather than bigger pixels.

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