Security

IoT, encryption, and AI lead top security trends for 2017

A new Forrester report identified the top 14 cybersecurity trends for enterprises to watch in 2017.

The Internet of Things (IoT), encryption, and artificial intelligence (AI) top the list of cybersecurity trends that vendors are trying to help enterprises address, according to a Forrester report released Wednesday.

As more and more breaches hit headlines, CXOs can find a flood of new cybersecurity startups and solutions on the market. More than 600 exhibitors attended RSA 2017—up 56% from 2014, Forrester noted, with a waiting list rumored to be several hundred vendors long. And more than 300 of these companies self-identify as data security solutions, up 50% from just a year ago.

"You realize that finding the optimal security solution for your organization is becoming more and more challenging," the report stated.

In the report, titled The Top Security Technology Trends To Watch, 2017, Forrester examined the 14 most important cybersecurity trends of 2017, based on the team's observations from the 2017 RSA Conference. Here are the top five security challenges facing enterprises this year, and advice for how to mitigate them.

SEE: Network Security Policy [download] (Tech Pro Research)

1. IoT-specific security products are emerging, but challenges remain

The adoption of consumer and enterprise IoT devices and applications continues to grow, along with concerns that these tools can increase an enterprise's attack surface, Forrester said. The Mirai botnet attacks of October 2016 raised awareness about the need to protect IoT devices, and many vendors at RSA used this as an example of the threats facing businesses. While a growing number of companies claim to address these threats, the market is still underdeveloped, and IoT security will require people and policies as much as technological solutions, Forrester stated.

"[Security and risk] pros need to be a part of the IoT initiative and extend security processes to encompass these IoT changes," the report stated. "For tools, seek solutions that can inventory IoT devices and provide full visibility into the network traffic operating in the environment."

2. Encryption of data in use becomes practical

Encryption of data at rest and in transit has become easier to implement in recent years, and is key for protecting sensitive data generated by IoT devices. However, many security professionals struggle to overcome encryption challenges such as classification and key management.

Enterprises should consider homomorphic encryption, a system that allows you to keep data encrypted as you query, process, and analyze it. Forrester offers the example of a retailer who could use this method to encrypt a customer's credit card number, and keep it to use for future transactions without fear, because it would never need to be decrypted.

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Image: iStockphoto/HYWARDS

3. Threat intelligence vendors clarify and target their services

A strong threat intelligence partner can help organizations avoid attacks and adjust security policies to address vulnerabilities. However, it can be difficult to cut through the marketing jargon used by these vendors to determine the value of the solution. At RSA 2017, Forrester noted that vendors are trying to improve their messaging to help customers distinguish between services. For example, companies including Digital Shadows, RiskIQ, and ZeroFOX have embraced the concept of "digital risk monitoring" as a complementary category to the massive "threat intelligence" market.

"This trend of vendors using more targeted, specific messaging to articulate their capabilities and value is in turn helping customers avoid selection frustrations and develop more comprehensive, and less redundant, capabilities," the report stated. To find the best solution for your enterprise, you can start by developing a cybersecurity strategy based on your vertical, size, maturity, and other factors, so you can better assess what vendors offer and if they can meet your needs.

SEE: RSA Conference: New ransomware could poison your town's water supply if you don't pay up

4. Implicit and behavioral authentication solutions help fight cyberattacks

A recent Forrester survey found that, of firms that experienced at least one breach from an external threat actor, 37% reported that stolen credentials were used as a means of attack. "Using password-based, legacy authentication methods is not only insecure and damaging to the employee experience, but it also places a heavy administrative burden (especially in large organizations) on S&R professionals," the report stated.

Vendors have responded: Identity and access management solutions are incorporating a number of data sources, such as network forensic information, security analytics data, user store logs, and shared hacked account information, into their IAM policy enforcement solutions. Forrester also found that authentication solutions using things like device location, sensor data, and mouse and touchscreen movement to determine normal baseline behavior for users and devices, which are then used to detect anomalies.

Forrester recommends verifying vendors' claims about automatic behavioral profile building, and asking the following questions:

  • Does the solution really detect behavioral anomalies?
  • Does the solution provide true interception and policy enforcement features?
  • Does the solution integrate with existing SIM and incident management solutions in the SOC?
  • How does the solution affect employee experience?

5. Algorithm wars heat up

Vendors at RSA 2017 latched onto terms such as machine learning, security analytics, and artificial intelligence (AI) to solve enterprise security problems, Forrester noted. While these areas hold great promise, "current vendor product capabilities in these areas vary greatly," the report stated. Therefore, it's imperative for tech leaders to verify that vendor capabilities match their marketing messaging, to make sure that the solution you purchase can actually deliver results, Forrester said.

While machine learning and AI do have roles to play in security, they are not a silver bullet, Forrester noted. Security professionals should focus instead on finding vendors that solve problems you are dealing with, and have referenceable customers in your industry.

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About Alison DeNisco

Alison DeNisco is a Staff Writer for TechRepublic. She covers CXO and the convergence of tech and the workplace.

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