Networking

Make your home PCs accessible anywhere with Dynamic DNS for free

You can access your home network from the public Internet without investing in a pricey broadband account that has a static IP address. See how to use this free DDNS service to configure your router to update the DDNS server with your dynamically changing IP address and open the ports necessary to access your resources from the Internet.

This article is also available as a PDF download.

You may have a home network with a permanent-on broadband connection that allows you to access the outside world anytime 24/7, but how do you go the other direction and access your home network from the public Internet? This might be possible if you wanted to spend two to four times the money on a broadband account with a static IP address (an Internet Protocol address that doesn't ever change), but that's not feasible for everyone. Fortunately there is a free and easy solution to solve this problem with DDNS (Dynamic DNS) service from DynDNS.com. This article will show you how to set up a free account, configure your router to update the DDNS server with your dynamically changing IP address, and open the ports necessary to access your resources from the Internet.

Things you can do with Dynamic DNS:

  • Remote Desktop or VNC into your own personal computer from anywhere on the Internet. This usually doesn't use a lot of bandwidth, but it could if you enable desktop animation and audio or video playback over the remote connection. You can learn how to configure Remote Desktop securely in this article.
  • Host a personal Web site from your own computer. This is bandwidth constrained because most broadband services don't have great upload capacity. Most broadband connections are capped at around 128 to 384 kbps, although some lucky users have 1 mbps of upload capacity.
  • Host your own FTP server. If your FTP site requires a username and password, this is a dangerous thing to do because the username and password are sent in the clear. Anyone can sniff that and break into your FTP server. If the username and password are used for other things as well, an attacker will be able to break into that too.
  • Host your own game server. This is also bandwidth constrained to approximately 40 kbps per gamer who connects from the outside. Don't try to exceed eight external players if your upload capacity is 384 kbps.
  • Host your videos with something like a Slingbox. Note that this can kill your upload bandwidth because video is bandwidth hungry.
  • The possibilities are endless once you have a Dynamic DNS address, but be warned that capability comes with responsibility. You're now opening yourself up to the public Internet, and you must do what's necessary to harden your resources against hackers.

Create your own DynDNS.com account

To get started, you must create your own DynDNS account by going to the DynDNS Web site and clicking on Create Account. There, you'll need to fill out some personal information and provide a valid e-mail address for confirmation, along with the username and password. Choose Other for How Did You Hear About Us and paste the link to this article under Details. Agree to all the terms of usage and click Create Account. Once you get a confirmation e-mail, you'll need to click through the confirmation link within 48 hours to activate your account. Once it's activated, you can log into your account.

When you've logged in, click on the My Services link in the upper-right corner of the DynDNS Web site. Next, click on Add Host Services. Then, click on Add Dynamic DNS Host, and you'll see the Web form shown in Figure A. You can pick from a list of available domains to use. If you're a Linux fan, you might want something like "homelinux.org." If you're a gamer and you want to host Internet games, you might like "game-host.org." There are many to choose from, but not every hostname will be available, since they may already be taken.

Figure A

You need to fill in the Host Name and click the Add Host button on the form. You won't need to enter the IP address because it should already be filled out, and it's the job of the router to update this IP address. So if you choose "homeip.net" as the domain and choose some unique and never used before hostname, such as "MyUniqueHostName," your new DDNS name on the public Internet will be "MyUniqueHostName.homeip.net." Anyone accessing MyUniqueHostName.homeip.net will get to your home address even if it's constantly changing.

Forwarding ports to your internal network

Once your DDNS account is set up, you'll need to configure your router to update the server with your IP address. You'll need to verify that your router supports DynDNS. I'm going to show this with a relatively cheap Linksys WRT54GS router, which is fully certified to update DynDNS.org.

Note: There is an alternative to router-based DDNS updates, and DynDNS.com offers a Windows client. I personally don't like to run any extra software on my computer, so I prefer using a hardware client and having it taken care of in the router.

Figure B shows the configuration page for DDNS. It's on the main Setup page under DDNS. Simply select DynDNS.org as the DDNS Service, type in the username you set up with DynDNS.com, enter your password, and type in the fully qualified hostname, such as MyUniqueHostName.homeip.net. Now, click the Save Settings button. When this is complete and the Web page refreshes, it should say DDNS is updated successfully under Status. This means MyUniqueHostName.homeip.net is now reachable from the public Internet.

Figure B

Once your fully qualified DDNS name is visible from the Internet, you'll need to open the appropriate ports to access the applications you want. In Figure C, in the Applications Gaming section and under Port Range Forward, you'll need to add some ports. The Application column is just a name you choose to label the ports you're opening. In my example, I've opened up TCP ports 3389 and 3390 for terminal services. Anything coming from the public Internet going to port 3389 (used for Remote Desktop or Terminal Services) will get rerouted to the internal host 192.168.1.11. Port 3390 is a nonstandard port I chose for a second Remote Desktop host that will get rerouted to internal host 192.168.1.12. Once you've completed these port-forwarding entries, click on the Save Settings button to save your changes. Note that you should use static IP addresses on these internal hosts because any change in a DHCP address will cause port forwarding to break.

Figure C

Changing the Windows Remote Desktop port

Windows Remote Desktop defaults to TCP 3389, but you can have only one machine using this port when you're sharing a single IP address. If you want to open up a second computer for Remote Desktop, you'll need to configure a nonstandard port. You will need to edit the following registry key with the RegEdit command:

  • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server\WinStations\RDP-Tcp

Figure D shows how this will look like under Vista, but it should look similar in Windows XP. To set an alternative key for the second Remote Desktop host with the IP address of 192.168.1.12, simply change the default 3389 value to 3390. You can keep incrementing the ports for additional hosts you want to open to the Internet.

Figure D

Don't forget about security

As powerful and useful as this technique is, convenience comes with responsibility. Anytime you open a port to the outside world, that service -- whether it's a Web server or Remote Desktop server -- can potentially be a backdoor into your network if you're not careful with security. Opening up ports to the Internet means that anyone around the globe can take a shot at your services. Remember that it doesn't matter what operating system or platform you're using. When it comes to getting hacked on the public Internet, the most important thing is that you follow best practices for locking down the services you expose. Since this article gives examples of using Remote Desktop from anywhere on the Internet, it is critical that you configure Remote Desktop securely.

67 comments
Nubem_com
Nubem_com

Hello
What do you think about https://nubem.com/dynamic-dns.php ?
Dynamic DNS comes for free, and you can bring in your domain name.
Would you like to try it ?
Any comment and suggestion is very welcome.

peggyres
peggyres

I was also trying to find a service provider. Is there any reliable and free ones except DNSdynamic and Dynu? I need a few~

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

want to do this. I've a lot of data at home I often use elsewhere, so I take it with me as a copy on a USB drive. That ensures I don't have open holes in my home gateway security and I have a good copy still at home if something goes wrong with what I take out. If you have huge amounts of data on your home system you feel you need to access while away from home, I wonder if you should be storing it at home at all, cause it sounds a lot more like a business need of a consultant than a home usage, and thus it should be done in a more business like manner with portable storage systems.

Zoey11
Zoey11

Cool, I’ve been thinking about how to do the last part for a while. I’ve been running DynDNS on my DD-WRT router (so it updates my IP when ever it changes) But I need to access my FreeNas server for a presentation for school. I thought about VPNing in, but I guess I could just forward port 80 to my FreeNas box. I’ll just need a stronger password then I have now. Thanks guys

admin
admin

Make your accessible home Server Secure. A home server is an excellent project but it is also a good way to let unwanted visitors into your home network. Be sure to check your services for security issues. Try a free scan from http://www.broadbandsecurity.org - Nmap and Nessus available.

diaza56
diaza56

Great article, it help me configure my router to access my network from the outside. Only thing is that when I type in my hostname, it gives me the router's page not the application I wanted and that I put in in the "port range forward". How do I fix this?

cwroblew
cwroblew

I really like it. It works without my paying much attention to it. In fact, after installing it, I let it run for a couple of years and then realized I really should make sure there is no upgrade for this. I still only check periodically for upgrades.

steve@busconma.com
steve@busconma.com

The downside of using DDNS function in a router is that DynDNS will drop your account (actually only the single DNS entry within your account) after 30 days if it hasn't been "touched" in that time. Router-based DDNS service usually will touch (update) the DynDNS site only when your IP address has changed, not on a 30-day timer. If, as is often the case, your IP address is not changed by your ISP in more than 30 days, you will lose your DynDNS account entry.

bobx
bobx

Similar service that I have found to be reliable over the last few years

LouCed
LouCed

Is there an XP alternative to this article link? "configure Remote Desktop securely"

Marty R. Milette
Marty R. Milette

Virtually all services providers have a clause that states you may not run certain services from your connection. Their primary concern is the consumption of bandwidth and traffic -- denying service to other customers. As a result, they use DHCP with extremely short lease times to force your public IP address to change too often for any traditional DNS service to be useful -- hence the development of DynDNS and other similar services. Some providers DO offer a fixed public IP address -- such as my provider here in Russia -- for an additional $10 per month -- however, I am limited to 1GB of traffic per month, and if I go over that limit, it costs $30 per each additional GB! (Needless to say, I don't do any P2P from here!) DynDNS does nothing that would violate your terms of service in and of itself. All it does is allow you to refer to your public IP address by name instead of by number, and automatically adjusts the mapping as your IP changes. What MAY violate the terms are the services you decide to hang off of that IP -- and those would function no differently with or without DynDNS. DynDNS or other similar services simply make it easier to 'find' your public IP address remotely.

Why Me Worry?
Why Me Worry?

carriers, such as Optimum Online, Comcast, Verizon, etc? I believe they specifically mention in their terms of service agreement that residential class broadband is not to be used to host any web server or other services on the internet, and dynamically registering your DHCP assigned IP address with a DNS domain name probably falls under that same scope and would be in violation of the TOS agreement. The broadband service providers see it this way..."Why would you need a DNS name assigned to your DHCP assigned public IP address unless you are hosting services out on the web?". Sure, they offer business class broadband with a static IP address for such purposes, which they profit off of obviously, but this free workaround may just end up being the end of one's broadband account if the ISP finds out what is going on. I'm not being a hardass, but I'm pretty sure there are legal implications to doing this. Please check with your broadband ISP before using such a service.

Yamust B. Kiddingme
Yamust B. Kiddingme

What application are you using to attempt the connection? If it is Microsoft's Remote Desktop, then you should forward the correct port - 3389 - to the host that you are trying to reach. On the other hand, if it is some other remote connection software, then you need to know what port it connects on, and forward that port. If the application allows you to specify the port on which it will connect, then you have to forward a selected port, and specify the port in the connection string. e.g., myhomeputer.ddyns.com:6524, if you are connecting on port 6524.

2ashishs
2ashishs

Hi! i am newbie... i was trying to setup a home webserver.. i tried dynamic dns, no-ip & a few other services..but my main problem is that i get a username-password prompt on entering my site name...i dont no wat thats for.. by the way, i've a dsl broadband connection n win xp pro sp2.. plz help...

Dumphrey
Dumphrey

will allow you to set keepalives if I remember right. I think linksys sends them by default. Im guessing that the account is droped after a month if their is no traffic from the address confirming it still exists.

georgeou
georgeou

I never heard of that one.

Johnson.Charles.C
Johnson.Charles.C

Use an SSH tunnel for your connections, there are a multitude of document available for it. Google it. ;-)

georgeou
georgeou

No, XP hosting RDP isn't secure at all. You can get a secure XP client, but you can't get a secure XP RDP host. Only Windows Server 2003 with SP1/SP2 or 2003R2 or Vista can host secure RDP connections. You will need to use a VPN alternative but be careful of using something like PPTP because that's VERY insecure. I haven't analyzed VNC yet but that's something I'm going to get to.

holmescd
holmescd

Has anyone else tried LogMeIn Free? I've been using it for a month or so and it seems to work very well for me. The only pain-in-the-butt is that I have to install a small program onto the client machine. I always get my customer's permission before doing so, and it's been a great asset. However, I'm concerned about security. LogMeIn Free uses HTTPS, but I don't know about the ports- does it use anything in addition to the HTTPS port? Here's the link: https://secure.logmein.com/home.asp

lhanson
lhanson

I was hoping someone who knew what he was talking about would speak up. I found Mr. worrier to be tiring with all his what ifs? People like that are the reason I pay close attention to personality when I am hiring someone new. Push the envelope. Nothing ever gets accomplished by playing it safe. Let my cable company try to cut me off. I have DSL and another cable company to go through.

georgeou
georgeou

"DynDNS does nothing that would violate your terms of service in and of itself. All it does is allow you to refer to your public IP address by name instead of by number, and automatically adjusts the mapping as your IP changes. What MAY violate the terms are the services you decide to hang off of that IP -- and those would function no differently with or without DynDNS. DynDNS or other similar services simply make it easier to 'find' your public IP address remotely." Great explaination! I guess if you don't run a public web server then it may not be an issue. I can't believe bandwidth is so expensive in Russia.

georgeou
georgeou

I don't think you want to do that. Technically they don't even want you sharing multiple PCs with your broadband link. They certainly don't want you hosting services or using BitTorrent. But if you can't do these things, why would anyone buy Broadband? Consumers need to stand up and say no to this.

Dumphrey
Dumphrey

on Win XP for the web site? If I understand correctly, you open a browser and type in your dyndns site name, and then a username/password box opens? You may have directory security enabled, and its looking for login/authentication credentials. Try pinging the site from a remote computer..ie "ping bob.dyndns.org" from a friends house, what you do not want to try is to go out your router and back in through the firewall to check connection, that usually is very problematic and buggy.

georgeou
georgeou

Did you set up the DDNS name right? Can you ping your host name from the outside world?

jbk1524
jbk1524

The only way that I could fine to get free Dynamic DNS from DynDNS.com is to sign up for the "pro" free trial. http://dyn.com/dns/dyndns-pro-free-trial/ The trial is 14-days. if you don't cancel, they charge your credit card for the annual fee of $20. The policy states; If you cancel your Pro service, all advanced features with Pro will be removed and your account will expire without a monthly login. Should you choose to cancel, you will be able to keep one free hostname.

Grayson Peddie
Grayson Peddie

but I can't find it in the DynDNS website. However, I can tell you that there is an update-abuse policy. http://www.dyndns.com/support/abuse.html I have a Vonage telephone adapter (VT2142) and DynDNS reported an abuse... So I had to use Windows client.

georgeou
georgeou

You can host an IPSEC or L2TP server on your gateway. That will allow you to connect to anything securely. Don't ever use PPTP because the authentication mechanism isn't secure.

Why Me Worry?
Why Me Worry?

Whatever other traffic is passed through is encapsulated within standard HTTPS packets, thus making it a user friendly solution that will work through most firewalls as long as HTTP and HTTPS aren't being blocked.

wmlundine
wmlundine

I use DynDNS so I can monitor my home webcam from work. I have done this with several different ISP's and never had a problem.

deepsand
deepsand

[b]Time Warner Cable subscribers can share broadband Internet access via Fon Technology's public/private Wi-Fi router.[/b] Stephen Lawson, IDG News Service Tuesday, April 24, 2007 06:00 AM PDT Subscribers to Time Warner Cable Inc.'s cable modem service in the U.S. can now share their broadband Internet connection with others through Fon Technology SL, which provides a special public/private router. Fon's La Fonera router lets broadband users in homes and small businesses operate an internal Wi-Fi network that is secure and another one that is open. Users can choose how much of their broadband capacity is dedicated to their own use and how much is available to the public. Anyone who uses the router to share access at home can use other La Fonera routers when they are away from home. Other people, called "aliens," can pay US$3 per day for access. Business users can choose another plan in which they get a portion of that $3 per day fee instead of getting free access on the road. This is the first such partnership in the U.S. for Fon, which works with ISPs (Internet service providers) in several other countries. Fon has almost 60,000 "community members" in the U.S., despite the fact that most DSL (Digital Subscriber Line) and cable modem providers don't allow their subscribers to share a signal. Fon is talking with other ISPs in the U.S. about similar deals, said Joanna Rees, CEO of Fon US, in San Francisco. Fon Technology, founded in 2005, is based in Spain. Time Warner Cable will share in the fees aliens pay, but will also benefit because Fon makes broadband more attractive, Rees said. More consumers would sign up for broadband if they knew they could take advantage of it on the road, she said. In addition, La Fonera keeps neighbors from leeching off a customer's open Wi-Fi network without signing in or paying for Fon service. Customers will join the service through Fon, according to the companies. Details of marketing are still being worked out, Rees said. Time Warner Cable has 6.6 million cable modem subscribers in its 33-state service area and delivers cable TV to 13.4 million customers. The average speed of its standard Road Runner service is between 5M bps (bits per second) and 7M bps, according to Time Warner.

deepsand
deepsand

If that's the case, then why do they provide instructions for doing so? And, in some cases, further facilitate such by offering wireless routers at either a discounted price or bundled with the installation package?

lowtimeppl
lowtimeppl

In the UK at least, most of the bigger ISP's will supply a wireless-capable router free when you sign up for their service..and happily supply instructions on how to connect multiple hosts, enable sharing between them. The argument that you run a service from your home network? isn't always the case either..my DDNS exists purely to allow me to connect *into* my home network to control my PVR etc. and ok that's me, but I'm fairly sure that's the case for many others. Using BitTorrent? They don't mind...if they did, why would they not just cap download quantities across the board? They don't, but you may pay more for uncapped services.. Having these issues? Change your ISP..

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Twice if you count the time I called my broadband tech support before morning coffee and admitted to having a local network; "sorry sir. Please call back when you have only one computer attached to our cable modem." The other time was a stern email recieved telling me that open ports had been detected on my machine and that running of FTP or any other network server software was not allowed. Imagine my surprise after running a local FTP (for personal use when away from home not 'sharing') on every server since the modem days. What's this letter you sent me? I can't have remote access to my own files or a port open to remote into my computer to use my desktop from outside the home? DynDNS is a fantastic service. Now we just have to fix the broadband moneygrab. They provide a cable from my wall to there wall, what I do legally with the end of that cable inside my walls shouldn't concern them. But up here, we call it Rogers High Speed and they too are happy to sell you a premium business service just for fair use of your own hardware.

Why Me Worry?
Why Me Worry?

so I'll have to stick with using a cable modem for now. With that stated, I am bound by the terms of use agreement as stipulated by the ISP. I can try to do things behind their back in hopes that I'll get away with it, but what if they find out and terminate my account? Is this service really worth the risk of losing one's broadband service and possible being blacklisted from ever getting broadband again?

Dumphrey
Dumphrey

can't get your site on your computer through your router, port forwarding is not correctly set up on your router. First, use static IP on the machine with the web site to prevent random breaking of port forwarding, Second, go into router config and point external port 80 at internal ip and port 80 of the local machine hosting the site, OR register the site on DyDNS on a port other the 80, such as 8070, in which case forward that port to the server. If you are entering the dns nbame of your site and getting router config, then either port forwarding or your DynDNS ifo is incorrect.

2ashishs
2ashishs

Hi! if u really think its directory security enabled then plz do let me no how to disable it provided it does not harm other files :) ... btw i was using WAMP software (from www.devside.net)..which i guess means i was using apache instead of iis... even though i was able to get thru u/name pwd prompt to router config... i'm still not able to redirect my site to my comp... Thank for replyin :)

2ashishs
2ashishs

Hi mate... the username pwd prompt i got was actually for my router...i searched it from portforward.com (the username & password); but i cant understand how how to configure it... my router is ustar ut-300r2u... it has a config option for virtual server, which is quite confusing coz even after i set it up & type my site name, i get the same router config page.. Thnx for replying :)

georgeou
georgeou

There were some devices that try to update something every minute and that was putting too much of a load on to the servers. You're suppose to only update when it's needed and it would seem to me that updating something once every 40 days if that's when the address changes is being a good citizen. Here's a quote. "To conserve resources, DynDNS uses a blocking mechanism to protect against excessive updating. DynDNS blocks update clients by useragent and will disable a user's hostname if it abusively updating. Why Was I Blocked? You needlessly updated a hostname too many times. The update client that you were using is abusing our DNS Update API and we block abusive clients to ensure quality service for all of us." Ok but this is confusing. "Updates should only be performed when your IP address has changed. We allow users to modify or "touch" their host every 28 days to prevent their hosts from expiring. Everything else is abusive." Not sure what they mean by "touch". If they mean that if you try to resolve the name once every 28 days, then it will be kept alive, then that's good. I'm using a certified hardware client with Linksys so that should keep me safe.

templink
templink

I've been using LogMeIn free to access my home computer when I'm away. My router (supplied by my ISP) does not support DDNS. LogMeIn is no speed demon, but it works, and setup is dead easy.

tonypmartin
tonypmartin

In the faqs on BTs web site they specifically say that hosting a home web site is ok for option 1,2 & 3 (ie those options with usage limits). tonypm

lowtimeppl
lowtimeppl

..but in my own experience, I used NTLWorld then moved over to Orange ('free' with mobile phone) and have had no issues with either provider vs. what I am doing. I don't use DynDNS as my router doesn't offer it in it's preconfigured selections..I found another, totally free solution and use a client.

tonypmartin
tonypmartin

chris, I have been wondering about DDNS with BT home broadband. I am thinking about using that just to run a small web server to a very limited (acount login) user base to provide a small online Ruby on Rails App. I have wondered what BT's view might be, guess I wont know till I try it. If I was looking to do more than a small service, then I would be looking at an alternative service, or at some stage, justifying the cost of a managed server. tonypm

Dumphrey
Dumphrey

the main reason ISPs turn ablind eye to bit trrent and the like is that that alone is one of the driving forces behind bigger bandwidth/more expensive "bundle" packages. I know some of you will say streaming video, etc etc. But honestly, how many people stream dvd quality video to their computer compared to p2p downloads. People want to be able to download 4 movies while playing Quake4 online. If an ISP did not offer improved speeds, a competitor would step in and take the buisness. That is just market economy. But, in the long run, Im sure cable/dsl companies would prefer to offer us ISDN speeds at T1 prices still.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

At the time, I had an FTP for personal archives used for small transfers like documents when I was at the school lab computers. VPN sat on an open port so I could get into my own desktop if I needed my machine. I could understand if your pushing a steady upload and download of monolithic files but having normal access too my machine? I accept the responsability of protecting my machine from adding to a botnet but they have to cater to the weakest link so everyone's portscan has to look like a browsing terminal.

georgeou
georgeou

What if their TOS says you can't use Vonage or Lingo but you can buy their VoIP service? Would that be ok?

Why Me Worry?
Why Me Worry?

Don't you think I know that the connection is anything but dedicated beyond he local loop? It's all either a packet or circuit switched network from that point on.

Why Me Worry?
Why Me Worry?

Yes, I don't think it's fair and monopolistic on their part, but it is their network we are using, so whether we like it or not, we have to play by their rules.

georgeou
georgeou

In the US, they might be fined by the FCC if they block DynDNS.org. That would actually be a Neutrality violation. ISPs can't block services that compete with their own.

georgeou
georgeou

There really is no such thing as a "dedicated" connection. Your DSL link might be dedicated between you and the DSLAM a mile away, but I can assure you that it's not dedicated beyond that point. With many cheaper DSL services, they slam 100:1 ratios in on the Internet backhaul.

georgeou
georgeou

Most recently they have caused a lot of people trouble by throttling ALL encrypted connections. If you're using VPN, they'll assume you're using BitTorrent. Where I live, at least we can switch to DSL if we don't like the cable service.

Why Me Worry?
Why Me Worry?

and hook up 20 PCs' to access the web, but their primary concern is that the home user doesn't host any services because that will definitely saturate their network and result in increased support calls from other users whose connections are slow as crap. Realize that cable broadband is just like a frame-relay, it's a single shared pool of bandwidth, and if one person starts hogging it up, there is less of it available for other users. It's not like a point to point T-1 or a dedicated DSL connection, in which your connection is switched and the bandwidth is exclusively yours on your local loop run.

DanLM
DanLM

You will find that most ISP's now block both the web and mail server ports, they just can't be used. But, that's easy enough to get around. At least with web ports. As far as watching outgoing bandwidth. Shoot, there is a huge amount of uploading that occurs anymore because of streaming video/audio/p2p. Web Cams, sharing of pictures, voice communications, hell... Sharing of files. Now that you bring up the topic of FTP running, I haven't found an ISP yet that blocks that port. Which is pretty strange. My personal opinion. ISP's throttle your speeds anyway. With the biggest cap being on uploads. They know it's happening, and they know that personal web sites being run from home servers are the least of their worries. P2P in my eyes would be the biggest offender. They still are turning a blind eye. Not that I would ever run a home ftp/web server from my home. Naaa, honest sir. It's for my home network which you know about. By the way, zone edit is a free dns which I have seen automatic updating applications be used to keep the dns up to date with the correct isp. Spend 8 dollars, register a domain, and you can do pretty much what you want just by signing up with zone edit. They even have ssl login to the dns maintenance pages for security purposes. Dan

georgeou
georgeou

I can't make that decision for you. This is something you'll have to decide. I haven't heard of too many people getting banned for using DDNS but I can't say for sure if they've enforced that rule. Technically you're not even supposed to be using multiple PCs on a broadband connection. I know they've banned people for hacking their cable modems to unlock the bandwidth and that's very illegal because it's bandwidth theft. How you use the bandwidth and connectivity you paid for is definitely on the grey side.

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