Education optimize

10 alternative careers for burned-out IT workers

So you're thinking about leaving IT -- but you're not sure what to do instead. Here are a few alternative fields where you might be able to use your talents in more satisfying ways.

I recently wrote an article that caused a bit of a stir. That article, 10 reasons for quitting IT, brought to my inbox an onslaught of email agreeing with my reasons and/or asking for advice on where to turn. After giving it some thought, I decided I would take a stab at a follow-up article to try to address the question "What should I do instead?" Here are a few possible alternative career choices for admins and consultants wanting to get out of IT.

Some of these ideas might make perfect sense, whereas others might make you say, "Huh?" Either way, look at them as suggestions that are related to your current field -- which you may or may not have already thought about. The relation to IT might be a bit of a stretch in some cases, but for others it will be quite obvious.

Note: This article is also available as a PDF download.

1: Auto repair

This might sound a bit crazy, but modern vehicles more and more depend upon computers. In fact, without the computer at its core, the modern vehicle wouldn't be able to accomplish half of what it does. From emission control to hybrid power to brake control, automobiles depend upon computers. These computers are nothing more than embedded systems that depend upon another computer to troubleshoot, diagnose, and repair them. And since most IT admins and consultants love the thrill of fixing things, becoming an automobile technician makes perfect sense. Granted, you will need to get the proper training to make this leap.

2: Teaching

The educational system does not have enough good teachers willing to go the extra mile to help future IT pros understand the career they are about to embark on. Does that mean you should step into education so you can beat it into your students' heads that they will suffer immeasurable frustration during their career as a consultant or administrator? No. It does mean, however, that you can prepare them for the challenging road that lies ahead. And many of you will certainly understand how much difference it would have made in your lives if someone had helped prepare you for the challenges you have faced.

3: Working for a smaller company

If you're unwilling to completely leave the field of IT, you could step down from that fortune 500 position and join a much smaller company. Having a much smaller network to deal with, few computers, and users who don't have that same attitude toward you will remove a world of suffering from your shoulders. You could even step into the not-for-profit world and really feel wanted and loved. Although the NFP field has its own set of headaches, they aren't nearly as intense as they can be in the upper echelons of capitalism.

4: Architecture

This is another career that would require more education. However, you like numbers. You like the order and design of the world around you. And you could learn CAD more quickly than you learned subnetting. Architecture is one of those fields where the sky could literally be the limit. You could spend some time in the great outdoors, you would be using the numbers you love so dearly, you would have a modicum of control over your own fate (perhaps being self-employed), and you wouldn't have to deal with downed networks, fail-over, end-users, and lazy programmers.

5: Programming

You've spent years dealing with bugs, bug squashing, and software in general, so why not join the developer ranks and start coding yourself? Most of the programmers I know are good, although quirky, people. Some of them live singular, solitary lives, work long hours, and are dedicated to what they do. The biggest difference between programmers and admins/consultants? Programmers' stress and headaches are specific in nature and tend to involve only one or two major problems (code won't compile, features need to be added, etc.). Now I won't kid you into thinking that programming will be an easier, less stressful route than consulting or administration. But you won't have to deal with the avalanche of problems coming from nearly every corner of every building you walk into.

6: Writing

One of the biggest downfalls in the world of computer software and hardware is its documentation. Because software and hardware are ever-evolving markets, the minute you put out a book or manual, it's out of date. That means those manuals must always be updated, renewed, refreshed. Take those skills of yours and build a brand for yourself. Write the manual for a piece of software, hardware, or protocol. Or find a blog to write for. There are millions upon millions of computer users out there, and most of them have no idea what they are doing. The world needs good writers of computer manuals and how-tos, because we know the manufacturers aren't creating these documents.

7: Management

Not that you would ever see me working the management side of the coin, but this field is a good fit for a lot of administrators and consultants. This is especially true for consultants who have had to run their small shop or one-man show and keep the ball rolling. Those types have the necessary marketing, management, and communication skills necessary for management. But understand this: You will be trading one set of headaches for another.

8: Research and development

Companies thrive on research, and that includes tech companies. What R&D departments don't need are people who have no idea what they are talking about. As an administrator or consultant you have been out in the trenches. You know how things do work versus how they should work. You are fully aware of the real-world needs versus the company-created needs. A voice like yours could be of incredible value to a company creating the next big thing in IT. Of course R&D tends to live only in bigger companies, so you would have to make your way though the mounds of resumes already piling up on the HR desks. Figure that out, and you might have a perfect match.

9: Cosmetology

I know, I know. This one might seem crazy on the surface, but give it a chance. First, there is an elegant mathematic to the art of hair design. I did a short stint in the field and really enjoyed it. Not only are you dealing with real people with real issues (some issues a bit bigger than others), but you see instant results when you are done. There is no sitting around and waiting for the rug to be pulled out from under you (as is inevitable in IT and consulting) no dealing with budgetary constraints or security holes, no horrific hours, and no cloud!

10: Farming

I couldn't resist. Based on the amount of readers who truly wanted to pull way back to their "roots" and be farmers, this seemed like the perfect way to end this piece. Farming might well be one of the single most rewarding professions in the history of professions. Yes, it's hard work, yes there is very little money to be made. But man, is it a good way to reclaim yourself. Digging in the dirt, creating the very things that sustain life... what more could you ask for? If you choose to go this route, I would highly recommend you bank a nice nest egg first, because you won't get rich off the fat of the land. Your soul might, but your bank account? Not so much.

Taking a break

Naturally these ideas are all subjective, but everyone has a skill other than IT they can bank on. Even if it's not the most marketable, profitable, or manageable skill known to man, you have something you can turn to when IT or consulting loses its luster. And who knows, maybe a break from the field is all you need. Go be a farmer for a few years and then, if you need to, come back to IT. Don't worry -- admin and consulting work will still be here. You'll probably have to play a massive game of catch-up, but you'll get back into the race more quickly than you think.

Other alternative professions?

This is a just short list of possibilities, but there are plenty more. What other careers do you think might be well suited for those who are thinking about leaving IT? Have you ever switched fields only to return to a tech job? Share your thoughts in the discussion.

About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

212 comments
RobMorin
RobMorin

Hello all, I came across this article while actually searching to see if others had felt the same way about their IT careers. I was actually surprised that so many did.... i myself have been in IT for almost 25 years, and i am frankly bored and tired of it! Too much stress, too much change and all too fast! Its not like the old days of IT i say... Hehehe.. I read a post here where a person suggested a Myers & Briggs test, i did it and it was pretty dam accurate to the way i feel, my score was ESFJ. I am not sure what I would like to do though? I live in Montreal, Canada, i am not perfectly bilingual, so my opportunities are reduced by 90% All public sector/customer facing jobs require perfect bilingualism, reading and writing. I mean i would even love to work at a retail store like best buy or The Source as most people that work in these stores have very little or no experiences or insight into electronics but i do. But i cannot as my French is not good enough...and the pay is not enough to keep my family going. Although to help reduce stress i created a hobby music site with music i like that is hard to find now, its also work i love to do. TheLoungeSound.ca i figure maybe for retirement i can do that full time and actually do some live DJing. I do like to interact with people and enjoy helping people out regardless of what it might be, whether repairing PC, giving someone a lift or DJing a party for free. I like music, parties(who does not), organizing events and keeping people happy... My past job experiences are Security Systems(CCTV, alarms, card access), some office management, and lots of IT work Linux sys admins and windows sys admins, 1st & 3 rd level support. I am so tired of it now... to an almost depressed state of mind. The pay is good, but i hate the thought of going to work in the morning now. The last job i had and current one, i was hired to move a company from one location to another for the technical stuff, Network setup, phone setup, alarms, camera, card access... these duties ended up merging into(for lack of qualified people at either company) organizing the contractors or finding contractors, buying the office equipment and pretty much running the whole show of the office move. It was very enjoyable, i also found myself being relied upon for other office duties as well ordering office supplies, making sure the cleaning crews were doing their job, organizing company events, etc... However after the moves were complete and all is working as it should with respect to IT related stuff and alarms cameras and the rest, i found myself back doing IT only stuff, with a few office duties thrown in and became bored once again. Does this mean i like "office management"? I do have a tendency to be organized and acute. Being 48 and getting on in years i found my self wanting to do less physical work, like i cannot go back into installing alarms and security equipment, but i can organize its purchasing and installation, i can also organize lots of other office tasks and or even more company moves... Sorry for rambling on but i needed to vent... If anyone has any suggestions please feel free to help me decide what i should go for... Thanks and to all, and have a great day!

light50
light50

stumbled upon this link looking at alternative IT careers. I'm a programmer and you can imagine my surprise when I see programming in the list. Just my personal opinion.. DON'T go into development if you're thinking of quitting IT. Farming sounds great.

duncpott
duncpott

Have to agree, I once took a "temporary" job in IT after a rather miserable postdoc in Medical Physics where several little Hitlers reined. We had an escape committee, for real. 16 years later and I'm employed as a fairly senior IT Manager in a major European scientific institution in the UK. Both I, and my team, are routinely treated like mud by one senior manager (though others are remarkably lovely people to know and work with). The disrespect from this individual, and staggering micro-management, is both intolerable and shocking. The micro-management aspect is crippling, you can never plan anything as it will be questioned and disapproved of, and this makes working an intolerably difficult experience when you know exactly what needs done and how to do it. My experience is that IT roles such as programming, web development and related can be pretty enjoyable, but stay well clear of any kind of management role. Your own managers will be dolts more often than not, and they won't care if you drop dead from stress. What next? In search of that answer, led me to this very article. If I find out, will let you know.

IT Pixie
IT Pixie

I actually started my makeup company and worked retail for a cosmetics company for a while after my 1st IT career as a software developer for OSTK... Well, that didn't quite work out, as it turned out, so I'm now back into IT...

KarlX
KarlX

I'm 45 and have been in IT for 15 years, but was a mechanic and into classic cars for 6 years a long time ago. Obviously cars have changed dramatically. Am I too old to change now?? I need to work with my hands again- no more staring at a screen all day. Need to be creative. Any other suggestions which include building or repairing a mechanical "something" and yet be creative too? Thx.

Buzztech76
Buzztech76

I currently work for a not-for-profit, and although there is a lack of Upper Management mentality (My Boss is a Tech Guy who understands tech issues and resolutions) there is also a lack of financial equivalency. My job should be easy, my company provides a non-essential service, and paper will do just fine when the computers go down, however, this is never the case, even the slightest issue causes co-workers to panic. EX1: I???m getting an error on my computer ???Traffic from IP address 212.???? Is blocked because a malicious cookie was detected??? or something like that. EX2: This thing says an update is ready, what do I do? My Resume includes: Local Tech Shops, Microsoft XP support, Then for something completely different, I worked at a sawmill as a lumber stacker, for 1 week and 1 day, fell and busted my arm on Concrete, was unemployed for almost 2 years, did Sales and Self employed Tech work to supplement unemployment income, tried my hand as a Crossing Guard, and then got this job. I will no longer be trying on any different hats, I am however looking for a part time job to supplement my income, you win some, you lose some, but in the end, I leave the job behind me when I go home now, I'm not sure if it is age, experience, having a Boss that "gets it", or all things combined, but my stress level has never been better!

Caspians Friend
Caspians Friend

I teach one college course a year and am picking up another one. It depends a lot on the students, but I teach at a small private Christian college--the students are really quite amazing. I brought in a guest project manager and afterwords she couldn't stop talking about how engaged and fun the students were! Those kind of classed make teaching huge fun. Besides, we play MineCraft and other games as object lessons.

Caspians Friend
Caspians Friend

My "alternate" vocation is video production, both live events and the "film" (video level). Technical, yet an artsy side, requires lots of project management, which I love, and tons of team work--if you're the director. If you like being semi independent, by a hand held camera operator for large events (I love working my tail off in a concert trying to get the director to take my guitar shot or drummer shot). If I were burned out enough and/or the right opportunity came along, I would go video.

expatdoc
expatdoc

Lovely piece and sound advise! Agreed - IT and medicine share the same principles of analysing, diagnosis and treatment. Both fields deal with humans. (You guys don't fix the computer/program problem - you fix the distressed person(s) computer/program/problem.) Communication is the basis on which both these disciplines are practiced - and much can be said on that topic alone. I like the suggestion of writing manuals/how to's - it has application in all fields. And then farming...we have a little joke: How do you make a small fortune out of farming? The answer: You start with a big one! :) But yes, as far as fullfilment goes - few things equal farming.

jiiwill
jiiwill

Seems like the troubleshooting and problem-resolving skills are also suitable for taking up a bit of PI work. Correspondence courses abound on the principles, techniques, and start-up processes. Once you get started there are background investigations, credit verification, photo surveillance, skip tracing, and many other areas that will keep your interest going. Much of the investigation work can be accomplished through Internet research and some with email queries. There is even an association of PIs that share information or perform work within their area for a fee which helps reduce travel costs. As your own boss, you can take the jobs that interest you and for the most part, leave the others alone, or farm out the work to another PI better suited for the job. The pay probably isn't steady or lucrative but could be supplemented doing work as a bounty hunter or personal body guard if you have the inclination for such things. Then, there is also gunsmithing which may be a more viable option if you are mechanically inclined and may be worth more if the economy collapses and chaos becomes a major problem.

cbigham
cbigham

I ran from the Farm when I was 18 getting an electronics technical degree and then a BSEE- After both burnout and not landing another IT job after a companywide layoff, I went back to my rural roots (17 yrs. later) and helped my brother farm (row crop and livestock). This lasted two and one half years and I really enjoyed being outside. It was great getting away from Corporate IT. As a farm laborer it payed $6.00 an hour and I typically worked 6 days a week and about 65 hours except during harvest than more like 90 hours a week. The only health benefits were losing all my fat and building great strength. I was forced to get back into IT (in a smaller environment) by my wife insisting I was not using my education nor was it paying the bills. However, it was a good break but time to move on! I had a differenct perspective and really enjoyed IT again after this experience (and not tracking around in freezing mud). If you are burned out go try something different for awhile!

Syzygy01
Syzygy01

I rebuild/refurbish pc's donated to local charaties and assemble a system from donated peripherals. They have something to sell that cost them nothing and that gives me something to do. It's amazing what people leave on their hd's, so they usually need a thorough cleaning before they are useable. Doing low-hassle computer work for local businesses pays the bills. A secretary with a deac pc is a helluva lot more appreciative and a lot less stressful than a building full of lawyers with a dead network.

Boriqa
Boriqa

Teaching is a very fulfilling career.

dave-richardson
dave-richardson

I was going to change when is 2008 I could not find a job. Then I got a great paying job.... sigh.. still int he treanches. But i am doing R&D testing, which is a lot easier

dj2011
dj2011

Work from home, always something to do...

bkblake
bkblake

Because you could learn CAD faster??? That's the dumbest thing I have ever read. FIrst, learning CAD as an application, and knowing what you are drawing and how to draw it can take years. Second, Architecture has about as much to do with CAD as IT has with programming an alarm clock. CAD is a tool that Architects 'can' use to create their final drawings - after planning, research, design development, budgeting, customer meetings, contractor meetings, engineer and consultant meetings, code review... Then there's project specification manuals, contracts, testing and licensing, continuing education, etc. I always get a kick out of people thinking that knowing how to use CAD is "Architecture". That's called being a CAD operator, or draftsman.

EHFrancisco
EHFrancisco

A smaller company has its??? own set of headaches. I left IT sales for a very large computer company (my choice not theirs) for work as and IT manager for a small family owned company. It started out great, but with the downturn in the economy I am now am not a IT staff of one, I never have a vacation where I am not on call and I have no one to pick up the slack. I have more stress now than I ever did with a large company. I am now looking for a job with a larger company.

lyndonpace
lyndonpace

At least then you would feel wanted, and be earning money. What proves your wanted more the a push notification on your iphone. ( sorry, this couldnt go unsaid )

mommy2twinz
mommy2twinz

My cousin farms about 400 acres and makes around $300K year. He live well. FYI

ceso_softdev
ceso_softdev

I took a sabatical from IT... I was completely burn out. After a long career on IT I was basically ready to pull an AK-47 on the first customer that came knocking on my door. So I decided it was the perfect time to get away from it all and finaly turn into reality a life long dream of becoming a professional Chef. I set up a small catering business and took advantage of all the contacts I had made during my career. Let me tell you people... best time of my life. After almost two years away I was refreshed and ready to come back. Now, with the perspective gained from working a completely different industry day to day problems do not seem like the end of the world. I'm responsible for the Help Desk of a large company, I have 3 shifts of people (24 x 6) and still happy. One piece of advice, if you need a break TAKE IT!. just make sure you choose something that you really really like. Many of us are hardcore IT professionals who love the IT business. There is no shame in taking a time off and then returning with renewed energy. it worked for me. good luck!.

rborkowskijr
rborkowskijr

Hi; I'm retired but would like to continue doing something in the Unix, AIX or Linux world. Can you be more specific on how to get started on this writing path. I did tutorials, "DITTY BOOKS", and troubleshoot aids when I was working. Thanks; Tom Borkowski

kpinne01
kpinne01

Why does taking a break need to mean exiting IT? IT is what fascinates me. The things that fatigue me are the insane political decisions that make it difficult for me to do my job well in IT or the regulatory and project priorities that make it difficult to take care of the embedded break/fix operations that I need to take care of. A break from some of this corporate emotion and frustration could mean working as a consultant, an auditor or a sales engineer and serving the customer for while. This is probably idealistic, but it seems that traditional corporate IT is the source of frustration, not the technology field itself.

alsmith
alsmith

I worked in the NFP sector and it was much worse than anyone could imagine. I was completely burned out and decided to take 1) a break and 2) become a farmer. The break did not last long as I am now back at work for a wonderful organization. The farming I still do and I love it just as much as my IT work. Don't discount the money to be made in farming, find your niche in the agri world and work as hard at it as you do your IT career. I have taken classes and become certified in several farm-related fields. My life is complete now because I have the best of both worlds.

cowen80194
cowen80194

I have worked in many fields from fast food to retail. Every one has its own bed of worms. I was working as a Cable tech for a multi-million dollar company until I was layed off/fired due to the latest economy down sizing. I became self employed and there are bumps in the road. I do have to admit (wife included) that since I have become self employed I can actually do what I want (need) to do when I want (need) to. I have a girl on the way and a 15mo boy and the difference between the 2 is my girl I can put everyone on hold and start fresh after the birth my boy I had to get permission to be able to be at his birth and only for so many days. Running her around for appointments I have yet to miss one to hear the heart beat as she develops unlike all the missed with my boy. Would I go back to working for someone only when I can have the flexibility I enjoy now. USA was strong when people depended on their own sweat and tears and not on a big company to stand behind them and take care of them until retirement. Im 40 now and this is unheard of today in the market place its all about what and who can do the work cheaper and off shore it to them. We need to bring back the "ROOTS" as the author mentioned and help to rebuild Corporate America is not going to do it.

Aneldinho
Aneldinho

i think that would be best because, there is no challenge in it, you keep on doing the same thing everyday and once your mind has been cleared you could come back in IT the world of stress!! and at least you will be working with computers!!

angelav25
angelav25

took 3 yr break from IT & worked outside looking after horses was brilliant & ran my own small IT business couple of hrs aday at most. Was brilliant sadly recession pops up and I have to now do full time work to make ends meet...boo hoo

jwchr
jwchr

Jack, I've been teaching, am working for a small company, in naval architecture, doing some programming, and writing while being management. Also I do R&D for the company. I am beginning to farm as well. Instead of working on autos, I will be working on experimental aircraft.

TheComputerator
TheComputerator

My sister works in IT in a small business and she hates it. 50 -60 hours a week with no overtime, no pay increases for years because the company can't afford it, promised training never delivered and the usual problems with user demands are just a few of her issues with the company. Unfortunately, a hugh mortgage and a single income keep her there because she has no other skills to change fields and what's the point in going into the same situation elsewhere. Obviously, your situation is different but just because it is a small business doesn't mean it is going to be easier.

jstinnett
jstinnett

I retired from the auto-finance industry after 15 years....but found myself enrolled in a community college IT department. My wife suggested I get a nice "un-stressful" job once I had acquired a good basic foundation. I don't know about "unstressful" but I have enjoyed the last 10 years or so more than the previous 15.

galic.miroslav
galic.miroslav

A side that Developers/Programmers might be one of the most stressed group in IT but for sure it ia not the solution for stress releif. As consultant, if that doesn't include programming (wonder how??) with a fire from all sides there are a lot heads and shoulders arround to use as fire distinguishers and save a day. As developer/programmer there is no one else except you who can be used instead of you to take a blame and that is a stress itself that can be bigger than other IT workers can even think of.

timothy.lagerstrom
timothy.lagerstrom

In this matter you are no longer providing a service but governance. Especially in govt or govt contractor jobs, this can be very fulfilling. A/V technician. Also, Church service.... you could be doing stuff that is completely on the opposite scope.

glenstorm_98
glenstorm_98

Yeah, it's a little long, but the guy's a *writer* fer cryin' out loud! Of course, the question of whether anyone will *read* it is quite another, but hey! it's the way he's wired. I know, 'cause I'm a writer, too! -Dw

jkameleon
jkameleon

1: http://www.techrepublic.com/forum/discussions/102-341735-3423601?tag=content;forum-table 2: Telling the same thing over and over again to some brats... No way! 3: Been there, done that. Interesting experience, but career most certainly not http://virtudyne.com/ 5,7: Sounds nice, but don't expect to make any money competing with the lean NOSOTEK guys. 7: Dealing with people like myself? Are you nuts!? 9: Yeah! That's what I want to do: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Electric_face_mask.jpg :D . I'm not quite sure if I could resist turning up a voltage a little bit, though. 10: One's soul certainly doesn't get richer by farming, but I'm not so sure about wallet: http://jimrogers-investments.blogspot.com/2009/06/we-have-shortage-of-farmers.html In IT, "talent shortage" and "talent glut" are synonyms, but it's not necessarily so in farming.

opr_nexus
opr_nexus

After slaving your life to IT, it's time to learn and discover new ways to better your physical and mental health. Find a novel way to cure cancer or HIV and beat Big-Pharma to their game.

microrepublic
microrepublic

Hello, Been working for a non-profit for over 15 years and I was the sole go-to-computer-guy. I hate to say it but I've been running on empty ever since. I have already embarked on self-training on web admin/development/design but I find myself leaning more toward the creative aspect of web work. So maybe the web dev/design might be a great alternative....

angry_white_male
angry_white_male

I went from a mid-size company with an 8 person IT dept to a small company with a 1 person IT dept - ME! The benefits were good - 4 weeks vacation, and in the 8 months I was there, I used maybe 2 days. The reality was 10-12 hr days and not having any backup or relief. Eventually the company was no longer able to buy paper for the copier machine and they eventually went out of business. Thankfully I left before that happened and my successor is still looking for work.

Mac_IT_Guy
Mac_IT_Guy

6 months ago I left IT (IT Supervisor for 50 person firm and Desktop Support for 500+ person agency) to start a career in User Experience design, and so far I love it. Although my background in building architecture & design helped land the job.

bobp
bobp

Stock trading - or Forex (currency) trading - takes computer saving including writing code to find stocks meeting certain criteria. It also takes somebody who can keep his emotions from affecting his trading. Emotions and successful trading don't go together. If you have reasonably good routines set up and can cold-bloodedly(?) follow them, making money is likely - especially if it isn't day trading. Medium or longer term trading isn't so affected by temporary news stories.

cln
cln

Hello - I'm not sure what your definition of an IT worker is ... you recommend alternatives as: programming -- I was a programmer in the past and I consider a programmer an IT worker. I am Director of IT Project Management and still consider myself an IT worker so was again surprised at recommending "management" as another alternative to IT...?

shido641
shido641

This may sound absurd but this is one thing i would love to go into if i stopped IT. In relation to IT, it's about order and getting visual results as to what works and what doesn't. Let's take a project for example. You complete a project in stages and you realize that certain things just wont work as you expected it to work with the rest of the project. Now interior decorating it's sort of the same concept. Plus it's something that needs a keen eye, something that we IT guys seem to learn in our careers. What do you think, agree or disagree?

wiltshirejohn
wiltshirejohn

At least you'd feel right at home.... Knee deep in bulls**t

gnkallen
gnkallen

I retired about 3 years ago after 43 stressful years in Corporate Hell (aka IT). I held down serious jobs in IT Directorships (large Corporates) and laterly Senior Management Consultancy Roles. I now occupy myself by serving the population (circa 40,000) of my local village, to service the software on their PCs and provide tuition. I have never been happier. The pay is not great but it pays for the beer and the holidays and I get an enormous amount of satisfaction from it. What was the point of getting stressed about Project Overuns, travelling around the globe (don't miss this one bit), stupid end users and ineffective non IT Management. Happy Days, I am now 69, have around 400 customers and will continue as long as God spares me. Lots more Heavy Metal music still to listen to!!!!!! Geoff

Ole88
Ole88

... would be law enforcement. Every police cruiser you look in has a Toubhbook or some other portable computer in it. It wouldn't be hard to extend that skill - you could even rise through the ranks and become a cybercrime investigator or computer forensics technician. With the proliferation of technology into just about every space of life and work, you would be hard pressed to find a job that didn't involve some of the skills you have honed over the years in IT. I might change careers if I have to, but right now, I am just looking to get out of this "Job" and get my "Career" back on track. Maybe I'll give the technical writing avenue a shot and see how it works out.

Cincinnerdi
Cincinnerdi

My brother took over the family farm is is making a good living. Not long ago, he said, "The timing is good. There is a worldwide food shortage and prices actually allow me to do quite well. I made more money in 2010 than I did in the prior 10 years together."

armandolopezo
armandolopezo

I was tired of being and IT employee for almost 20 years. Tired of feel pressures, stress, lack of acknowledgement (sometimes), working hours, and so on (you know ??? e.g. 10 reasons for quitting IT). I decided to work on my own and I made a good move for me and my family. Even though you don???t you receive same money at the beginning, the freedom and peace you receive deserves it (also, maybe within some years you will have the opportunity to get more money that you got like employee). I suggest beginning offering Home Services at a low fare doing computer repair (hardware/software). Many people want service at home: They don??t want to move their computers, they have a small network, slow internet connection, viruses, etc., or they don???t want to invest time to take/bring time the computer to the repair store. If you feel not secure or a little old fashioned, you can train yourself some months offering free repair or volunteer services until you feel you are on shape, or at least, you feel you can try. Be quiet, with your experience, in little time and case by case you will be more secure of yourself and you will be appreciated for people who receive your service. Probably, you will be happier; money and better clients will increase little by little, but I suggest begin offering your services very cheap. When your demand increases a lot, you can increase your fares, but again, I suggest do it gradually In less than a year or no more than two (most likely), you can work with small business too. Your satisfied clients will recommend you to friends. I believe the most difficult step is to start. Don???t be afraid or ashamed of offering yourself if you are at your forties or fifties competing with younger people, you have too much experience they don???t have. You should offer your services to friends, family, neighbors, and in internet in a popular site with low cost publicity. I chose in my country a web site similar to e-bay (classifieds) to offer my services for $20 a year, and it was my best advertisement. Clients began to call me and I began in my own job 4 years ago, now I only work with small business because is more profitably. Best regards, Armando

Gaius_Maximus
Gaius_Maximus

Think about it. Now think some more. It'll come to you.

JazzcatCB
JazzcatCB

@light50 AGREED! As a programmer of 30 years, coding for the internet is a MAJOR headache!

net.minder
net.minder

Oh - I thought the writer was referring to the so-called "IT Architect" job description.  For that, you do need some CAD skills to make the network and system diagrams you'll need.  But image libraries of IT equipment are easily available, so the rest is just connecting lines and so on.