PCs optimize

10 high-tech gadgets I can live without

Think all IT pros go crazy over tech tools and toys? Not Alan Norton. In fact, he may be approaching geek heresy with his take on these popular devices.

I didn't think it could happen, but it has. I've become old school. It wasn't all that long ago when I was but a young pup punching Hollerith cards in the basement of the University of Arizona's Computer Science building. I do find myself in part now longing for the simple days when IT was called MIS and 640K was considered enough memory for a PC.

There are new technologies others crave that I shun. One of my neighbors, Chuck, is a true lover of new technology. He has a robot named RoboSapien, and he just ordered a roving robot named Rovio that has WIFI and a Web cam. He tells me he wants to keep track of his Shih Tzu puppy, Bodhi, but I know a tech-obsessed person when I see one.

I like bleeding edge technology, but there are some high-tech devices I can live without.

Note: This article is also available as a PDF download.

1: The most annoying techno-gadget ever, AKA the cell phone

I had to use a cell phone as a requirement of my last job but I didn't have to like it. It was so small, I felt foolish talking into thin air, as if I were talking to some great invisible cosmic force and not a person. Are people really willing to accept limited coverage, lousy connections, roaming charges, and expensive monthly bills for phone-freedom? Obviously they are. According to Wikipedia, there were 4.6 billion cell phone subscriptions at the end of 2009.

Even those who can't live without one have to admit that they are often annoying beyond human endurance. And the photos they take can lead to all kinds of problems.

There are other issues, as well. When driving, you have to watch out for the cell phone packing motorist. When carrying one, you have to worry about being tracked. When using one, you have to worry about the controversial possibility that the thing is slowly cooking your brain. This is progress?

2: Electronic leashes, AKA the pager

These nasty little devices ensure that your workday never ends at 5:00. Just as soon as you forget that you are tethered to the job, the bleeping thing goes off and blasts you back to reality.

Like Pavlov's dogs, which salivated at the sound of a bell, I became conditioned to respond to the call for action. Upon hearing that awful beeping sound, the neurological connections in my brain were further solidified, linking the horrid device to the interruption of my peaceful evening. Is it any wonder I despise these insidious little technological monstrosities?

3: Slower-than-your-desktop-computer computers, AKA the laptop

At my last job, our group supported the national CSC help desk with new systems and software. Routine travel was part of the job. We were a new group and, no doubt due to a limited budget, we were given laptop computers and docking stations instead of desktop PCs. They were heavy. They were slow. They had lousy screens. Yes, they have gotten much better. But dollar for dollar, they still perform much worse than a desktop computer. Ever try developing on a laptop?

4: Virtual spies, AKA the Web cam

Why in the world would I or anyone else want to show the world how they look in the morning? Why should I have to shave before sitting down to my computer? Why should I have to feel that big brother is constantly peering over my shoulder? Okay, so you can turn the darned things off, but are you sure that electronic eyeball staring you in the face is really off?

5: Undercover agents, AKA RFID chips

I have no problem with companies or retail stores that want to track their inventory with RFID chips. I do have a problem when the shoes I purchased last year can be tracked wherever my not-so-little feet take them.

This is no longer science fiction. Companies as large as Wal-mart are preparing to use them for inventory control, theft prevention, and other well-intentioned activities. Unfortunately, unless some way is found to destroy them, remove them, or deactivate them before the customer leaves the store, the technology can be abused by those with less-than-noble intentions.

6: Wandering vacuums, AKA the Roomba

My best friend offered me a free Roomba and I turned him down. Why? Aside from the fact that I already had three vacuum cleaners, there was the question of the effectiveness of such a novel gadget. A battery-powered robot that automatically vacuums floors and is that small can't do a good job, can it? It might have been a fun exercise to gut the innards, but eviscerating and sifting through the disjecta membra seemed somehow disrespectful.

7: Alice in Wonderland books, AKA the e-book reader

I use the computer more than eight hours a day; I sure don't want to curl up with a good e-book at the end of a day. To be fair, I haven't actually used an e-reader. But I have to question the expenditure of precious fun-tickets on another all-too-specific device that has more drawbacks than advantages.

Jason Hiner recently wrote an article questioning the value of the e-reader: Kindle 3: Is there still a place for dedicated e-readers? The consensus from you, patient reader, is yes. But to me, the e-reader is like the question "Why is a raven like a writing desk?"

How long will it take the e-reader to disappear into oblivion like the Cheshire Cat?

8: Make-believe baseball, AKA virtual sports

In days gone by, kids actually hit round, leather-covered objects with sticks made out of wood. Now, every kid on the block has to have devices and video games that simulate baseball. Some even have man-machine interfaces that try to mimic reality while providing "exercise." Users look completely foolish as they try to pitch or hit a virtual baseball that exists only in their mind and the bits inside a chip.

Will the smell of grass, the warmth of the spring sunshine, and the joys experienced by the kids on the neighborhood sandlot under an endless blue sky be forever lost?

9: The embarrasser, AKA the speakerphone

A speakerphone is certainly appropriate in a meeting where everyone is aware that it is in use. Unfortunately, it becomes a habit for those who are too lazy to pick up the handset and inconsiderate to the person on the other end of the line. And then there is that awkward and possibly career-ending moment when you make that clever not-so-amusing-to-your-boss comment about his mandated "stupid meeting," not realizing that the speakerphone is on.

10: Please excuse my typos keyboard, AKA the virtual or miniature keyboard

I have received several emails lately that included a fascinating blurb at the end:

  • "Sent from my iPad"
  • "Sent from my mobile phone. Please excuse any typos."

Sorry, but I am not buying in to the notion that I should forgive poor grammar, bad spelling, or indecipherable texting because the sender is using a device with a lousy keyboard.

A new language, texting shorthand, is often the language of choice on devices with downsized keyboards. In its purest form, it has little resemblance to the English language. Will the next generation communicate like this? (TGG - TextGen Girl; TGB - TextGen Boy):

TGG: ru goin 2 prt 2nite?

TGB: idk ru?

TGG:  y hoas 9

TGB: pu

TGG: 99 kpc

TGB: sys

TGG: lycylbb

TGB: rbay

(Shorthand messages from netlingo and Webopedia.)

I may be an OBX (old battle axe) or just plain OTH (over the hill), but I find that really annoying. In fact, any device that uses a too-tiny-for-my-fat-fingers keyboard is beyond annoying -- it's unusable.

The bottom line

New technologies can be wonderful, and so-called geeks embrace them and extol their virtues. But there is often a dark side to new technology. Sometimes it's obvious. Sometimes it's not so obvious, possibly the result of the law of unintended consequences.

If you use any of the 10 gizmos listed above, more power to you. But please allow me the courtesy of disliking what I deem to be misguided technology run amok. And I guess that is the problem I have with a lot of the new technology. It is annoying, functions less effectively than tried-and-true devices, or is just plain unnecessary. I don't need a refrigerator that takes inventory or a microwave oven that is connected to the Internet. These appliances are too clever by half.

I get why people like their smartphones. However, a mobile phone subscription does not give one license to be rude or inconsiderate of others. We as a society should be careful that we do not allow machines to take priority over people or allow the use of "innocuous" dehumanizing gadgets to replace quality face-to-face time.

Technology pushes on and who knows? Some of these new gadgets might actually end up benefiting mankind in some meaningful way. Even with all of their issues, whenever I see an iPad or a new smartphone, a deep voice in my head says "Alan, give yourself to the dark side."

Author's note

I want to thank Chuck for being such a good sport and for the inspiration for this article. I also want to thank my niece Ami for her help with the texting information.


Check out 10 Things... the newsletter

Get the key facts on a wide range of technologies, techniques, strategies, and skills with the help of the concise need-to-know lists featured in TechRepublic's 10 Things newsletter, delivered every Friday. Automatically sign up today.

About

Alan Norton began using PCs in 1981, when they were called microcomputers. He has worked at companies like Hughes Aircraft and CSC, where he developed client/server-based applications. Alan is currently semi-retired and starting a new career as a wri...

248 comments
luiziox
luiziox

Seriously. I was expecting something less obvious and prejudiced. Like calling everibody morons.

Usukyuak
Usukyuak

While I gleefully conceed all of your other points, I beg to differ about the ROOMBA. I have used one twice a week for two years. I liked it so much that I gave one to my sister, my nice, and my other niece. They use them religiously also. It runs on my ground floor while I am away at work, and I empty the little bin once weekly into the toilet. It picks up about one cup of dirt including leaves and such tracked in from outside but most importantly about half of it is human skin. Admittedly it does not get a few tigh spaces but that's why God gave us the broom. If left to my own batchelor devices, the ground floor of my place would get a through vacuming maybe once a year but with ROOMBA it is spotless.

jacob189
jacob189

This need to be connected and to be able to communicate (wireless tech) is frustrating at best. I worked for company that had texting pagers. What a nightmare. Then the next upgrade was nextel. Since others in your group could talk without notice, many times emberassing comments were blasted at inapproriate times. Followed by cell phones and texting. Both of which I hate. Even though it was nice to call AAA when the car broke down. I love my laptop, though. It is carrying me thru my pursuit of accreditation at Phoenix.

janitorman
janitorman

A driver should NOT be distracted by even a hands free cel phone in a car. Cel phones should be banned for use in vehicles except for passengers in the back seat speaking quietly. My stepson was almost in an accident yesterday, a girl swerved into his lane... WHY? she was TEXTING while driving. Texting needs to be removed from cel phones. If you need to text that badly, go home to your PC and send an e-mail. You'll at least have a full sized keyboard to input your text on, then, allowing for full English words and sentences. You'll also be able to attach files, such as pdf documents, png images, etc. that cel phones can't handle. WHY would I want a crappy camera on my phone? I've so far taken about 100 pictures of my thumb, as the "camera" button is where the red "hang up" button is supposed to be. I'd prefer one without, thank you! I'll use a real camera to take pictures that matter. What's more, no company should allow cel phones on their property if an employee has access to sensitive data. They could simply take a picture of their computer screen, and BAM all the company secrets are out the door. GPS on a cel phone? What were they thinking. This feature should be disabled in a moving vehicle. Whilst looking at some tiny screen on your dash (or watching Tom & Jerry, for all I know.. they look just like TV's) and you'll run into a tree or someone crossing the street. Stop and ask directions if you can't take a map with you for a passenger to read. No passenger? Stop, figure out your route, and go on. Radios in cars should be banned, as well. They are distracting to drivers. I never turn mine on unless I am parked, and then I make sure not to distract other people by having it so loud that you can hear it outside the vehicle with the windows open. Any radio in a car that can be heard outside the car with the windows open should be removed. I don't want to hear your rap music, thank you, even if you're trying to drown out the fact that you took your muffler off and you can hear your car (or motorcycle) coming from ten miles away. (That is another pet peeve. A car should be silent, and not have exhaust sounds. Motorcycle, same. "Loud pipes get motorcyclists killed by guns." Silence those Harleys. I disagree on the e-reader. I can carry 1000 books in my pocket, as well as magazine articles, newspapers, etc. I don't have one that's connected to the internet, and probably would have no use for it. This allows me to read whenever I get the chance, WHATever I want, without bulky paper copies. I do draw the line, and won't read while driving.

franklymydear
franklymydear

I hope you write some articles that someone may actually care about. This one is completely useless, just like my opinion! You have spent the etnire peice complaining about things which by your own admission you do not use [some, not all, I give you that]. And if you haven't actually USED something, take the eReader for example, you really don't know what the advantage might be. How about writing about something you actually KNOW about which someone might actually find interesting and let the rest of us comment on what a great writer you are! [Reserving judgement for later there!] Or not...

GramJ
GramJ

Very clever post, much enjoyed it. The RFID chips thing is relatively disconcerting even if it would benefit occupational safety by preventing shoplifting incidences. http://www.ashasafety.com

dougwong
dougwong

I'm at the age I think I cannot do action sports like skateboarding, for fear of falling and breaking a bone, or two. But virtual sports like the Wii's skateboarding (comes with Wii Fit Plus), allows me to enjoy it and be virtually good at it without the negatives associated with it. So I think it has its pluses.

werziluk
werziluk

How old are you? This is terrible, seriously. Sounds like you dis like the people that use these particular devices rather than the actual devices.

Wadatah
Wadatah

Pagers still exist outside of the Smithsonian? This guy is terrified that his shoes are reporting his whereabouts to a shadowy overlord? Cell phones "cook" your brain? This guy should stop writing articles about technology and focus on things that he understands, like the victrola, or what varnish should go on your cane.

lguerrant2
lguerrant2

...and the dishwasher. I mean, can't you just wash dishes by hand? Sure having a dishwasher saves you time and energy, but so does not having to push your own vacuum - and that's considered a novelty. Oh to be able to opine on gadgets that you've not even used. I can live without hundreds of things that I've never used, I guess. Seems like a pretty simple concept.

DelphiniumEve
DelphiniumEve

My cell phone is for MY convenience. I do not see it as invasive. How others use it is invasive or disrespectful. People I am physically in the same room with get my attention. I do not take calls when I am having dinner with friends with few exceptions. The exception has a process. A text message of 911 must be received first before the call is made. This process is only known by 3 people who have the 'right' to use it. I have not had a pager in 5 years. Even when I did have one, I only had to have it on from 4am to 6am and 4pm to 6pm 4 days a month according to the rotation. Thanks for the idea. I need to design a wand-like device that will disable the RFID chips in the items I purchase. Speaking of which, where are those new Nikes I purchased @ Walmart??? Roomba, virtual sports, and eReader...yeah, I can skip those as well. As for the mini-keyboard, that does not excuse grammar and spelling in my book either. Due to my company's regulatory status, I must handle my personal email via a PDA since no webmail interfaces are permitted access from our network. I still use proper US English in all correspondence from these devices. I will never set a texting speed record, but I do not care. I still view some of these devices as good and due to my own rules, they are not a hindrance to direct, 'real' human contact. It is the person that makes them a pain.

gtbzdell
gtbzdell

I agree when it comes to the way people use the cell phone. I only have my cell for those times I have to access to a land line and it is an important. When it come laptops I sort of agree if you want a mobile desktop. But I love having my netbook because I do read ebooks. I even have an old palm I read stuff on there.

jfuller05
jfuller05

Sometimes, I think (and others) that I'm clearly not of my generation. I utterly despise texting when among a group of friends or even when it's a one-on-one environment. Do people even know what rude is anymore? I also agree with you about cell phones to a degree. It's really something to see people immediately use their cell phones upon leaving a store or building and continue the conversation as they get into their car. I see quite often when I'm leaving or going into Walmart and other stores. I like cell phones. I don't have a land-line, I just use my cell phone. However, there are many times that I leave it at home when I leave the house. RFID chips: I completely agree. I also don't care for the e-book readers and doubt that I will ever purchase one. I'm one of those guys that just isn't a slave to technology. I think ordering pizza online is ridiculous, or ordering any kind of food online is ridiculous, even texting your order in is just another evasion of human interaction. Would it hurt you to actually talk to a human? :)

richk
richk

Who uses a pager anymore?

john3347
john3347

Most of the items mentioned here, I have absolutely no need (or use) for. I booted AT&T out of my life a few years ago. I do have use for a cell phone to replace the phone that I used to have that had a wire (technically a cable) that plugged into a socket on the wall. I purchased a "smart phone" because my address book really gets messy when it gets soaked with sweat in my shirt pocket. My telephone is therefore used for two functions and for two functions only - telephone and address book. If someone wants to send me a quick message, call me and give me a quick message and get off the phone. (I ridicule my grandsons when they visit and I see them sitting in the same room texting each other - if they can lay their DS game players down for a few seconds.) I have a 10" portable computer with an air card that serves all email, book reader, latest news, online research, and whatever other functions that portable computers perform while I am away from home. I have multiple home computers (garage, workshop, upstairs, downstairs, etc. which become less used and less desirable as I transition from retired (so I can pursue fun stuff) to really retired (so I don't feel the need to pursue anything). Maybe one day I will get another wired telephone and leave my address book on the desk and dump my current cell phone. NAH - probably not!

tbrown
tbrown

Cell phones might be annoying in certain contexts, but I think that their usefulness greatly outweighs any inconvenience associated with them. Once I blew a tire on a major highway at 3am. Attempting to change the tire myself in that circumstance would have been dangerous, and the next exit was several miles down. At that moment, I wasn't exactly thinking of how much I hate my coworker's ringtone. This list to me reads like a reactionary airing of grumpy grievances rather than a poignant commentary on our society's over-reliance on technology. In the case of fantasy sports, it's just another way for sports nuts to get involved in their sports nuttiness, and not a gadget or high tech at all (unless you consider the Internet as a concept high tech).

techieplexia
techieplexia

It's a matter how you use the devices. I don't get the statement from people claiming tech is destroying human contact. Much of these devices is meant for increased human contact. My family will text each other when a full conversation is not needed. I am in the loop with them more than ever. If you have a cell phone and don't use it to connect with people, then you don't need a cellphone. Use it to game? Buy a gameboy. ebooks? really? If people are reading more because their eBook is more convenient to carry around than a stack of books I don't see how they are bad or going to disappear. Haven't tried the eBook with eink, try it before you add it to your 'useless gadgets list'. I admit that staring at a computer screen reading is painful, eBooks are not the same thing. Also, if you allow yourself to bring work home with you while not getting paid, that is your fault. If you are getting paid to take calls or pages during non-work hours and don't like it, switch jobs then. I have to question anyone that bitches about tech that forces them to work more. Laptops? Some people don't need ultimate gaming\publishing\developing desktops. My point would be to only buy and use the devices you really need that will enhance your ability to do a task. You have the right to not like something, but that doesn't mean they don't have useful applications. And if parents allow their kids to sit around playing video games instead of getting exercise, then they are bad parents. Did your parents allow you to just sit around all day? Bottom line: It seems you have had bad experiences with some of these gadgets and just want to complain about it or haven't tried them and you judge them. Perhaps anything in the tech field is not for you. Instead of compiling a complaint list we should try to find better ways to make these devices fit in. These lists are as counter productive as a six year old with a cell phone.

Jellimonsta
Jellimonsta

I have never owned a cell phone. I have had one for work for the last 10 years though, but it does not ring all too often, and I can count the number of times I have texted on my fingers. I have had laptops for the last number of years too, and do enjoy having them. I can live without everything else on the list though, and have done up to this point. :)

scottcote
scottcote

Alan, I also went to ua and had to make use of that computer center. Would you have been happier if someone reconnected the punch card reader so you can use it for text input (I was there when the last one was disconnected - was payed money by poor profs who had to have their fortran progs, but procrastinated till the last reader was disconnected). Maybe you would like all resonses of your messages (including this one) directed to one of those old printers at the center where you went to the building and picked up your output under your last name. Oh, but then you would have to haggle with some "young bueracrat" over your input message quota. How about lugging one of those vax computers around, or at least one of those luxurious serial connect terminals. Ah yes - the good old days. How much harder it would be to play MUDD on my blackberry. Btw - I hate pagers also. Keep writing - loved your article. SCott

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

Read the whole thread... nay, the whole tapestry of this discussion. Your answer will be forthcoming.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

[i]or what varnish should go on your cane.[/i] These things are not Varnished any longer and have not been for many years now. They get coated in a Epoxy Solution for a longer life if they are made of some kind of wood which very few these days are. Most are of a Metallic Nature that do not corrode. [i]Pagers still exist outside of the Smithsonian?[/i] Yep they most certainly do I know many doctors who still use them because Cell Phones have no business in the OR. [i]This guy is terrified that his shoes are reporting his whereabouts to a shadowy overlord?[/i] Where I didn't see any reference to this? But with the Technology being adopted [b]Yes[/b] it's most defiantly possible though it's far more likely that the Retailers are the ones getting the information for their own ends which is not to benifit their customers no matter what they claim. It's to get the customer to part with money that they may not have. ;) [i]Cell phones "cook" your brain?[/i] Sorry but this is still under investigation along with Low Frequency EM Fields. I don't know if they do or don't but I'm not silly enough to tell everyone who bothers to read what I post that one is true and the other is ridiculous. I've seen far too many cases where what was considered as [i]"ridiculous"[/i] has proven to be the fact not the fiction. :p [i]This guy should stop writing articles about technology and focus on things that he understands[/i] Then we would all be poorer as a result. The idea of most writing is to provoke thought and to be perfectly honest I can do without everything mentioned above. I don't need them to get my work done and I don't need them so that I'm tied to a leash that is always under someone Else's control. But maybe that is because I despise Pagers and what has replaced them in General Usage as they do not improve things but make you a slave to someone else's wishes who is incapable of organizing their own thoughts or actions. Col

Alan Norton
Alan Norton

You are wrong about paranoia. It is the loss of personal privacy and freedom that greatly concern me. I often wonder what our founding fathers would think of their great vision today. Would they take pride in what we have accomplished or would they point out in no uncertain terms how our freedom has been eroded over time? I am always evaluating my worth as a writer. I am, after all, still relatively new at this line of work. Should I find that my writing is not benefiting others, I can and will find something else to do. I see that you have just joined TechRepublic. Welcome! Your opinion matters to me and is duly noted.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

Your points answered, in order: Pagers still exist outside the Smithsonian. Maybe it was his shirt. The jury is still out on brain-cooking. He may be older, but your words demonstrate your extreme youth. Would you have been in a better mood had you had your diaper changed before you posted?

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

It's obvious the cat is very comfortable with that particular amusement park ride. :^0

santeewelding
santeewelding

Is near and dear to my heart. Some connoisseurs of cuisine and culinary would have it that dishwashing is all part of it. I agree. Don't need gadgets, either, next day comes time to wipe my ass and start the cycle all over again.

Alan Norton
Alan Norton

You have a very healthy and balanced approach to high-tech. If everyone were like you the cell phone wouldn't be the most annoying techno-gadget ever. You are right. It's people who make their gadgets annoying to others and human behavior is something that can be changed. So there is hope yet for the cell phone, smart phone, Blackberry, iPad, etc. Of course, using your rules I wouldn't have had an article to write. :-)

DelphiniumEve
DelphiniumEve

Okay, maybe I am being a bit of a snot. I actually like ordering pizza online. The folks that answer the phone (when I have called) seem to consistently get my order wrong in the last year. If I place an order online, I confirm it and get exactly what I ordered. It is not dodging the human touch - it is dodging the annoyance of incorrect product. I have also been known to order food from work online. I work in a cube and everyone in the office does not need to know where I am going and what I am eating. My office environment is annoying that way. If I want Orange Chicken, extra snow peas, and brown rice...it makes it easier to order online and I just run and pick it up when I am ready. This provides me a moment to get out of my work environment but only be out of the office 30 minutes. I then come back, start working again, and eat food I actually enjoy.

Alan Norton
Alan Norton

I imagine you get a lot of grief for not fitting in. I can relate. It is sad that so many of the Greatest Generation are now gone. They could teach us so much. Thank you for sharing your take.

techieplexia
techieplexia

I think ordering food is a matter of convenience for the customer and the business. I have been burned when ordering over the phone (order not right or missing items) vs. having the correct order when ordering online. It's not so much about not talking to humans. It's not like I am going to carry on a conversation with the person taking my order, especially if they are busy. I'm not saying everyone needs to be connected at every moment, quite the contrary. I love to go camping, leaving my devices at home. Swimming, hiking, playing cards, and talking with the people I am camping with. I don't think this ideal is lost to everyone. Tech just fills in a void for some. If someone can't get away from their devices, well their loss then isn't it.

Alan Norton
Alan Norton

Hi Scott. The article is intended to be tongue-in-cheek. If you can't laugh at yourself and some of your foibles once in a while then you are indeed old at heart. "I also went to ua and had to make use of that computer center." It wasn't noted for its personality, was it? :-) Thank you for the encouragement to keep writing. I needed to hear that.

santeewelding
santeewelding

I could add more, but you whupped his ass good and proper-like.

scottcote
scottcote

I believe Ben and Thomas would have put something in our "master document" to better protect our right from a tyranical company. Thoughts?

Wadatah
Wadatah

"Given what I see you having committed here." What does that even mean? Did you randomly slap words together, hoping for coherence? Prior to posting a comment, you should read it to yourself, out loud, in order to see if it makes any sense. If your comment DOES make sense to you when read out loud, then I commend you for learning the English language. Congratulations, good sir.

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

How often do all you people clean your cooker/stove/cooking-device, and its immediate and usually unaccessible vicinity? That is, under, behind, sides of, and cooker-facing sides of whatever borders on it. That's question number one. Now go look at those places, and answer question number two; is it often enough? I take no responsibility for loss of sleep and/or lunches. Any mess found is your responsibility most likely, and also most likely, to your benefit to uncover with all haste. If it's bad, grow some curlies, grab your rubber gloves (not just for playtime you know) and your detergents and brushes and hit that filth! Hit it hard, and hit it till it's gone.

jfuller05
jfuller05

You're not being a snot :D, you're just sharing your opinion, there's nothing wrong with that. I understand the quickness of ordering food online, I do, but I just can't get into adding technology to another piece of my life! lol

jfuller05
jfuller05

I don't have an iPhone, so some think that I can't possibly be in the IT field! Or if I haven't used the latest technology, which is usually just hobby technology, then I'm not "in." OK, sure, maybe I'm not "in" but it's just fad technology (I'm not talking about the iPad when I say fad tech.). I like reading physical books, exercising outside, talking/hanging out, and going out to do things. I'm not always connected, waiting for my cell phone to beep indicating I have a new text or dying to check my FB profile. I can dislike those things and still be an IT tech, you know?

Alan Norton
Alan Norton

Good point. Written communication is usually more accurate than verbal communication. Taking orders over the phone sounds like a lousy job to me so you might be doing some poor employee a favor ordering online. If there is more than one restaurant a check could be made to verify that the order goes to the right restaurant based on the customers address, but I guess that could be done with a little extra work for a phone order too. I can see myself using both and the wise restauranteur would have both options available to their customers.

jfuller05
jfuller05

Preference? Yeah sure I understand that. It probably does help with orders too, but I don't like being connected at every moment (nor do you I can see). Ordering online is just not for me.

Alan Norton
Alan Norton

Hello Scott. The founding fathers distrusted centralized power. They invented a clever method of checks and balances that spread the power amongst three branches of government. Ben Franklin was smart enough to recognize that information is power and would most likely successfully convince the others. We can logically conclude that the collection and use of information would be limited and not centralized in any one entity. What would actually happen is anybody's guess. :-)

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

You still haven't figured out that a complete sentence can be started in the title and finished in the body of the post. Your estimate of ages is inaccurate by some decades, and not in your favor. To further demonstrate the accuracy of such estimates, my estimate of your maturity falls well short of 2 decades. And finally, you belittle the tricks that allow us to apply appropriate adjectives without running foul of the censorbot. You may wish to desist now, lest you find yourself the defenseless one in a battle of wits.

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

You are a sucker of the highest grade. There's a censorbot. So that's why it's ass hole and not asshole, see? Donkeygap!

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

It's naggingly familiar, but I can't quite recall of whom. It reminds me of some ignorant git who joined five or six weeks ago, was active for three or four, then disappeared.

Wadatah
Wadatah

As we post, grammatical activists are organizing protests against your existence. More superfluous words than an Al Sharpton speech? Check. Misspelled a simple "insult" like asshole? check. A lofty sense of self-importance while presuming that somebody else feels that they are "perfect"? Check. Nah, I'm not perfect. I'm far from it... but I'm still better than you, and if I could estimate your age, I'd guess that you're in your late 30's or early 40's, which means that I am also better than you will ever be. I can't wait for your next installment of Schoolyard Insults quarterly.

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

I'm sure the garden society can cook up some nice humble pie for him to eat, it'd be good fun for us all to watch!

santeewelding
santeewelding

I suggest you buy property on the moon, then move there. There is no way in hell you can rehabilitate yourself here. Move there, retire and change your ID. Reapply for a new TR membership. Once done, keep your mouth shut except to remark at the wonder of it all. This means you don't come with all your pre-packaged shilt baggage. That baggage can be seen from a mile away.

santeewelding
santeewelding

You are patently not. You are in fact and in deed and in apparent intent, patently imperfect. There be no telling you that, though. Your imperfection would disallow any comprehension of what you are being told. Carry on, and good luck, ass hole.

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

has a scent like it's some regular's alter ego. BTW; it's a perfectly well-formed sentence. You can mutate it yourself to see that it's grammatical. Whether it's meaningful, that's up to you, a thing is meaningful only to one who has the capacity to understand it. Mutate: Given that he gave me a nickel, you may want to stop writing. Given that he saw you comitting something here, you may want to stop writing. Given what you did, and which he saw you doing, you may want to stop writing. Given X, Y. X is a noun phrase. It can be simple: Given a dollar, he stopped writing. Or it can be complex: Given that the earth turned out to orbit the sun rather than vice versa, he stopped writing. And now: "Given that frankly my damn - I don't give a deer, I'll stop writing".