Education

10 things IT pros do that lead to burnout

Stress, exhaustion, health problems, poor job performance, apathy -- all these can be yours if you commit a few career sins and get burned out.

I'd be willing to bet that there isn't one of you out there who hasn't violated some basic work/life principles at least once in your career. I can say with certainty that at various times, I have committed some cardinal sins when it comes to getting burned out. Looking back on my career from a slightly different viewpoint these days, I can see where I went wrong. And fortunately, I can learn from those mistakes so that I'll remain happy, healthy, and productive (in that order) throughout the remainder of my career. Here are 10 things you might be doing that will ultimately lead to poorer performance and an unhealthy lifestyle.

1: Never say no

As the saying goes, "You can't please all of the people all of the time." Trying to do so will result in certain failure due to over commitment, missed deadlines, and having everyone upset in the attempt to make everyone happy. Instead, commit to pleasing "some of the people some of the time," through existing governance structures. Both you and your organization will be the better for it.

2: Skip the vacation

American workers get and use less vacation than our global counterparts. This is a travesty, but it's one over which workers might exercise some control. Time away from the office is absolutely essential for recharging the batteries and renewing the spirit. Failure to "get away from it all" leaves workers with no opportunity for renewal and can also negatively affect family and personal relationships.

If your boss won't leave you alone on vacation, turn off your phone and don't check your email. Obviously, you should make sure that you boss knows that when you're away, well, you're away. This is setting the expectation ahead of time. If you're not allowed to simply get away for a period of time and your company insists that you be on-call 24/7/365, you need a new job.

3: Skip lunch

Early in my IT career, I used to work through lunch every day. I didn't feel like I needed it, and I was more interested in getting work done than in eating. However, I soon learned that lunch is about more than lunch. Everyone needs food to make it through the day, and that short break can be as good as a 15-minute catnap in helping you remain productive the rest of the day. If you constantly skip lunch, you're also missing an opportunity to engage with coworkers in a different setting. Over time, failure to take these short breaks might make you more easily stressed out -- and eventually burned out.

4: Work insane hours

Logic would seem to indicate that you could accomplish twice as much in 80 hours per week than in 40. However, in the case, the Vulcan would lose the argument. At some point, more time results in diminishing returns. If you push it too much, you'll end up constantly tired and sick and not doing anyone any good. There will probably be crunch times during the year when crazy hours will be the norm and expected. But if this happens year round, your organization will quickly burn itself out. Constantly working crazy, insane hours should not be a point of pride. It should be a sign that something is wrong and a warning that you'll probably get burned out at some point.

5: Disregard family time

For years, articles have been written about jealousy between those with families who need "family time" and those without families who are left to "pick up the slack." I started my family 10 years after getting into IT, so I've seen and understand both sides. Those with families who attempt to forgo family time will pay the price in a lot of ways. Stress levels will increase as they try to make up for this lost time. And those all-important family ties will begin to suffer, leading to an employee who is bitter and disengaged and wondering why he can't ever eat with his kids. If you want to avoid burnout, embrace and enjoy time with your family.

6: Fail to watch your health

How many of you exercise every day? How many of you watch every calorie you eat? How many of you weigh more than you did when you started your current job? This is one rule I've broken so badly it's not even funny. Since leaving my previous position, I've made it a point to eat better and have started losing weight. If you're in a stressful job, you may be a "stress eater," and you may suffer from the fact that stress can lead to weight gain and other health problems if not properly managed. So do what you can to get some exercise (take the stairs, walk to lunch, etc.) and try to eat better and not chow down on junk food while you work. This is much easier said than done!

7: Forgo hobbies

For me, tech started as a hobby before becoming my career. But I sometimes wonder if I need something else outside IT to keep me going. I'm an IT executive by position, but I love playing with tech toys every so often. That's one of the reasons I write. I get to learn more and play with cool new stuff. Find something you enjoy doing and make a point of doing it! For Christmas, my parents visited me and my family and brought us a cool new radio-controlled helicopter. It's really nice and could be the beginning of a new hobby for me.

8: Go it alone

Being a CIO can be really lonely sometimes. A lot of people in the organization really have no idea what we do and we're often left to our own devices. Still, there are a lot of ways you can keep the solitude at bay and make your job easier at the same time:

  • Find a trusted colleague and become friends. This works if you're both at the same level in the organization or outside each other's chain of command.
  • Attend local users' group meetings for things that interest you.
  • Find a network of peers in other similar organizations and work together, if possible. (This is common in higher ed, but it might not translate to other verticals.)
  • Use consultants when you need to. Not everything needs to be "built here."

If nothing else, these people can be good sounding boards to help you keep your direction positive.

9: Create unrealistic expectations

Expectation management is one of the hardest things to get right. You need to make sure that people realize you're working with a sense of urgency. But at the same time, you don't want to burn yourself out or overtax your staff. If you create unrealistic expectations by overpromising or under-delivering, you're going to stress yourself out to the point of exhaustion and your staff will not thank you for the extra work.

10: Pull all-nighters

There was a time when I would pull all-nighters to get a job done. With the very rare exception, I don't do this anymore. Besides the fact that I pay the price for days afterward, I unintentionally set an expectation that this is the norm when, in fact, it's not. Constant all-nighters are a sign that something is terribly wrong. Either your organization has no clue how to schedule work or you've taken on too much. Fix it before you burn yourself out. Sure, the occasional all-nighter may still happen from time to time -- but don't let it become routine.

Other habits that lead to burnout?

Do the things on this list sound familiar? What other practices have you followed that stressed you to the breaking point?

Additional resources

About

Since 1994, Scott Lowe has been providing technology solutions to a variety of organizations. After spending 10 years in multiple CIO roles, Scott is now an independent consultant, blogger, author, owner of The 1610 Group, and a Senior IT Executive w...

63 comments
nacolepsy
nacolepsy

This is really true, I'm guilty of all the above. It's high time we realized we are humans and not God. we can't please everybody. Great article.

benr72
benr72

Because in the 'real' world, Owners, Investors and CEO's are TOLD to overwork them to get as much as they can. The best advice is to say: Just find a company you'll be able to tolerate as much as possible; because you are the slave..you have no choice.

WMDH
WMDH

Work, rest, and play. A balanced lifestyle demands all three. And if possible in about equal measures. Just about everything said above comes down to that.

drragon
drragon

24x7x365? That's 7 years' work in one! Definitely time to change! :)

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

Run for your life when you start to play with a Remote Control Helicopter, you are on a slippery downhill slope that has at least 12 feet of grease on it. It starts out with simple little 2 Chanel Radio Control units that can go up down and spin around in the lounge Room and degenerates from that point on. The cost of the units blow out drastically and when you start looking at 3K Jet Motors thinking that would be really Cool in a Aircraft you are forever lost. There is no hope of recovery and just as an Appetiser look here http://www.xtremehobby.ashop.com.au/p/4487952/jet-central-cheetah-turbine-31lbs---14kg-thrust.html And that's just a Motor you then start looking for something that would be suitable to put it into and you don't worry about how you'll actually fly it just wanting it is the [b]Point of No Return.[/b] Col

nogov
nogov

This should be posted on every IT bulletin board in the world. The only thing I would add is that your manager should not be your enemy, if he is mismanaging, over-promising, etc. it is your responsibility to at least voice your concern. If he chooses to ignore it or is shot down by the higher-ups then unfortunately for him and them it's time you find a new job. I've been lucky to have a manager that fights for us come review day and I can't imagine what a hard time moving up the ladder I would have without his backing. If you are paid to work from 9 to 6 then clock out at 6! There will be another 8 hours of time to finish your tasks tomorrow. Around here they think posting a job resume on monster is a sign of dis-loyalty and when I tried to explain to them that it is a sign of low morale and unhappy employees I was told there should be no reason for anyone to be looking for another job without speaking to HR first.... this was after canceling the company trip as well as payment for unused personal days. That is when I started updating my linkedin.com and dice.com profiles :)

barbarahc
barbarahc

You don't actually have to say 'No' which can be a career ender. What you do is say 'Yes', but ask for the resources to be able to accomplish what you are being asked to do. Make sure that the people asking understand the cost / benefit of what they are asking, and let them decide if their budget can cover it and if it is worth it. My mantra to my customers: 'With enough time and money, I can do anything you want.' I let them decide if the benefit outweighs the cost.

ckarcher
ckarcher

My boss said today as he glanced at the list as I had printed it out and posted it on the fridge. I have been in IT since early 2000's. I did some of my own work. Then I got out for a bit. I then made some changes in my life that meant i needed a full time steady job. So i took a job as a tech at a computer repair center. In the 3+ years i have been there. I have gained a lot of weight. Become very stressed and irritable towards my fiance and family. I'm 25 and I'm turning grey. Any way I read this this morning before work. (well some of it because that's all i had time for). When i got to work i printed the article out and posted it on the fridge. A few hours later my boss made a comment. as posted in title. I had to go to a clients and when i returned i noticed that the articled had been "edited" the title read 10 ways to run a successful business. and (insert bosses name here) rules to business. As i read down the list certain things have been crossed off and new lines had been added in. Such as for wight gain walk three mile three limes a week. he listed off his hobbies and so on. I thought to my self. yes he does have a striving company, But we have a turn over rate that is insane. Hardly takes any advice from employees, But most of all hes so freaking burnt out its ridiculous. I mean hes always running around. Always angry. hes over weight. He has no hair. and has been divorced. Any way i have and could go on and on. Just wanted to share that bit of info. Take care all.

kpdriscoll
kpdriscoll

If you answered yes to all of the above, should you just end it now? All just part of being human, but scary how they really combine to knock you out. It therapeutic to just read through and think "Hooray, it's not just me!"

wedge1
wedge1

Bottom line about unrealistic expectations was passed along to me from my cousin, who is a senior accountant for a large insurance company. He said " the production of a baby takes 9 months from start to finish. You cannot reduce that time down to one month simply by putting 9 mothers into the production process." Some things simply are going to take "X" amount of time to do - if the organization can't accept that and just simply throws money at problems because some sales guy is good at making promises that his butt can't keep, then it's time to move on, because the pain of staying is on the way up. Great article - one to keep handy always.

Maelinar
Maelinar

I agree that you can???t please all of the people all of the time, but I think it is disingenuous to commit to pleasing ???some of the people some of the time??? ??? that???s enter the office corporate nazi territory. Rather, if you can please this one person this one time you are delivering a more universal (and unbiaised) service. Of course there are dangers to this approach ??? continual supply of non-corporately sustainable products spring to mind as does the analogies ???low hanging fruit???, and ???quick win???, and ???runs on the board???, in the context that you never get the opportunity to reap the ???high hanging fruit???. However, these dangers exist in all methodologies of IT development I???ve experienced. The rest of the article is on the ball. Looking forward to the ???10 things IT pros do that lead to extended performance??? article. Personally, I read Dilbert and watch the Office, and the IT Crowd. By way of logic, if its that obvious and common that people have made humour out of it, it helps me feel the same situation that I???m grimacing at while I???m at work is a common enough IT problem that I shouldn???t worry so hard about it.

mandrake64
mandrake64

How about burn out through caring for a system more than your boss. If it isn't important to him/her or the business then why should it matter more to me! I agree wholeheartedly with the hobby need.

richard.ayers
richard.ayers

Yep use to do all of them, Guess what I had burn out Now the complete opposite 24 hrs a week ???bliss???

ManoaHI
ManoaHI

One time, I had an equal (same level) colleague. The company hit a rough patch and downsized him out. So, I was there alone. Then I asked the company (several levels up), when are they going to start searching for a replacement. What shocked me was that they couldn't search for a replacement, that is why they got rid of him. But I said, don't hire someone as high up on the ranks (there were three levels below me and my former colleague) so then the light bulb sort of turned on. We got two people who combined earned less than my replace colleague (ok, less than half of what I was paid), but it was a year and a half later. There is also another point where regulators (I worked IT in an investment bank) said that people in my position had to take two consecutive weeks off, at least once a year, no work allowed or the clock is reset. Regulators check the company's e-mails and someone who is regulatory off gets their "regulatory leave" taken away. Finally, management got smarter and the company was doing better, when you were on regulatory leave, your access to the building is suspended, your login is put is locked out, your company supplied phone was to be turned in. Those were my best vacations, even if I only stayed at home. Essentially, no one is allowed to contact me. Sure, I met up colleagues who become friends, but only for drinks or lunches. Then we finally got some really good high level people, who actually started chasing people out of the office. If they noticed some people staying late, they hired more people. So, the only people who stayed late, started late, creating a kind of night shift (which I was not allowed to be part of). If your vacation got cancelled (I had one cancelled, because we were being audited, but not only did the company pay the late cancellation fees for me, they paid for new upgraded tickets for me and my family and gave me a night out with my family on the company's tab). They started a "you don't take leave, you don't get promoted or get your bonus reduced, policy", and it means those of us who had regulatory leave, we had to take two vacations a year. I also got a lot of leave time, about 60 days from carry over leave. Since they did not buy back the vacation time, I was an employee for 3 months after I physically left, I was on "vacation." The last five years at the company was great 1-10 were no longer "allowed." I left, but I was not burned out, it was because I wanted to return (I was out of the country) home. I moved my family to the U.S. and went back to school for a master's degree, and I didn't want an IT job anymore. But the job market was such that IT was basically the only work I could find, it appears as though a Masters in Economics is not really needed in our area, but it did help me get an IT job, but not so high stress.

michiel
michiel

I hate top-10 lists. Especially if you recognize all 10 of them :-/

cb-networking
cb-networking

You can find a company that respects your work/life balance. It may not be easy and you might have to find a new job which is stressing (espeically in the middle of a recession). I don't have the balance I want yet. Just a matter of finding the right company. You will never be on your deathbed thinking "I wish I had spent more time at work."

britezRoman
britezRoman

I'm usually the go to guy when it comes to the more extreme work, all nighters, long shifts, etc. Luckily, the firm rewards well with banked time. And what they do well is they are very flexible with when it comes to vacations. They know when I like my vacations and they make sure projects are scheduled appropriately around these vacations, plus they make sure you never get a call during your vacation. I camp, my hobby, its so beneficial and soothing that one time, I had even forgotten all the passwords. That's when you know you've had a good holiday. Give me serious down time and I'll be able to give some serious work time, a balance.

dcerisano
dcerisano

This goes for any profession. Why pick on IT?

cbecker
cbecker

I wish I didn't have to admin to all the above except #7. But I am and have always been the entire IT department for our non-profit company - three buildings, hardware/software tech, teach software, Lan, phones, copier, network and web. I'm never caught up and have limited access to outsource help. Hopefully this year they have enough in the budget to hire part-time help.

woftbo
woftbo

WOFTBO = "Watch Out For The Burn Out"

MikeGall
MikeGall

A lot of this just falls into not valuing yourself. I refuse to work through breaks if I can't take one later, work from home without pay etc. If my time is worth X per hour than I better see X for every hour I'm working. Don't give away hobbies, relationships, time, health for work especially for free.

'techy'
'techy'

There are allot of different positions that work with different technologies. I accepted a job at an enterprise to work with stuff I've only worked with in college. Enterprise plus a low skill level is not good. I put 5 of these on my list while I was there, so I left and got a different job at a little lower salary to work with stuff I was really good at. My stress level went so far down I lost 20+ pounds without having to change my eating or exercise. I remember hearing that stress can kill you, its true. If your at a stressful job and keep gaining weight and don't know why, get out now, going down a couple thousand on your salary for a position less stressful is worth it, trust me.

fhrivers
fhrivers

A lot of IT professionals I've dealt with seem to ignore the lack of vacations as "part of being in IT." That's BS. If you can't take vacations, either you need help or your company sucks. It's usually the young IT pros with something to prove who do this. They believe that they will be seen as "more dedicated" if they forgo vacations. No one will notice your dedication. They will just steamroll over you while enjoying their vacations and 9 to 5 schedules.

haunja
haunja

What you describe above is close to the work ethic of the corporate Japanese. And they are very aware of the results of a life driven by work. So much so that they have a word, Karoshi, which means " Death by overwork"

brad
brad

I find it funny that corporations still have the 1960's mentality of more work = more production. Technology and Society have matured, but a lot of these guys/gals in control still resort to more is better style of managing. To sum up with an analogy, managing in this style is like wearing a blindfold while trying to hammer a nail into a block of wood.

littlebuller
littlebuller

This list was just what I needed to read. Right on time. I need to pull it up every day and read it before beginning my work day! Thanks and God Bless.

nat.hansen
nat.hansen

Congrats to the guys and girls out there that have found an actual balance between work and life, I bow to you. I've heard many expressions (in my opinion all true) - no leave, no life - no life without wife, a happy wife means a happy life - work smarter not harder (true, but depending on what your doing, who's pocket does it really go in anyway?) Nothing more important than family and the life you create with them.

pfisher2k
pfisher2k

Stephen Covey, I believe, put it something like this: you have to keep your production in balance with your production capacity. For the last 10 or so years in my IT career, I have kept a simple interpretive diagram of this within eye shot so I don't over-do it. Yes you might get ahead or wow someone "important" with that ridiculously extra, extra-effort but it will absolutely negatively affect the quality or timeliness of another in the near future. Regarding "no:" I'd love to hear some motivating, individual approaches to practicing this. How do your readers rationalize it in their minds, i.e. practice it? It is my weakness and no self-explanation or reasoning I've yet come up with seems to make it stick.

mdwalls
mdwalls

I started out as a city planner and go into IT because I needed tools for policy analysis etc. I'm here to say, this isn't just about IT jobs. I came to the realization that I could work literally 24/7 and not get done all the stuff that city management expected me to do. I also realized that 2 hours after I croaked, they'd have emptied my cube and dumped the unfinished work on someone else's head. Fortunately, I also came to the realization that the world wouldn't end if most of what they wanted never got done at all. So, I decided to put in what I thought was reasonable hours at whatever job I took, on the most urgent/important stuff, and to produce output that I considered workmanlike or better. I wound up having a good bit of fun, getting a lot done, and feeling pretty good about myself. Oh, and I personally decided that 50-60 hr weeks were OK, and that the occasional all-nighter or all-weekend push were just part of the job. And, especially as I've gotten older, I've come to realize that excessive overtime is unproductive if not counterproductive. In the interim I've also managed to have a happy family life, and put myself thru a master's and almost to a PhD in my spare time.

andregous
andregous

Very true for someone working an the IT dept. What I realize also is most End Users who does not understand what you are doing think you are not busy and sit around all day.

sproe
sproe

The wonderful technology we have these days allows me to VPN in from home and work as if I were sitting at my desk. It is all too easy to think, oh, I need to check on one thing and end up still sitting at my home computer at 2 AM when I have to get up at 5:30 to get to work. No one asks me to do this, but our load is so overwhelming and there are so many meetings and interruptions at work it's great to be able to concentrate on something. Until the next day when I'm so groggy I can barely put two words together coherently.

king_salman_heart
king_salman_heart

This is what we call in pakistan "The Saith Culture". "Saith" is a stereo type for a spoiled brat (mostly very bulky in appearance) guy who has inherited his father's wealth and keeps bleeding his workers dry. When i started out there was this company that expected workers to work 12-13 hours a day with only one or two sundays off in two months(this is no exaggeration). I endured 4 years of that hell because options were limited. Now i am working for people who treat humans like humans. And since they are nice to me, if there is any problem i voluntarily try to help out with other workers when ever i can.

NunyaBZ
NunyaBZ

You either kill yourself or become unemployed, especially in IT. Honestly if you want to have a spouse and kids - do yourself a favor and don't go into this career track. It will end up hurting your relationships in the long run. You will find yourself checking email at the dinner table, at the beach, at the theme park, obsessively keeping in touch because that question can't possibly wait a few days...and even then get 'called out' for not working hard enough or quick enough. I'm not sure what happened to this industry but it's truly hell to work in anymore.

sysxadmin
sysxadmin

No one remembers the guy who lived at work basically. Once he is gone, no one misses him, all of his work achievements are quickly swept away like a sand castle built on a beach. The new employee comes in with fresh ideas, and everything they did or held sacred is history. I have seen this several times over, no one is irreplaceable that is ego and all things that go up eventually come down.

nat.hansen
nat.hansen

The first six (among others) sounds like my old job before I pulled the pin as an IT Manager. The CFO said there would be plenty of appraisal and bonuses for completed projects, enabling the business to move forward using technology..... Blah, blah! As far as I'm concerned, move whatever direction on the ladder you feel happy with, do what you love doing, show your employer a bit of passion but don't bother over doing it, bending over backwards gets you nowhere.

Shankarl
Shankarl

For some people, there will be your 8 hours??? work and you need to attend 4 hours of meetings every day. The actual issue is you go to meeting when you are working at peak of your concentration. After coming out you need 30 min to one hour to get back to same focus level. I think one need to spend time to decide which meetings to attend and say NO to un-related and un productive meetings.

Professor8
Professor8

The worst thing is not the 30-hour work-days. It's not the foregone vacations. It's when you produce something great, something valuable, something to make the company and the world a better place... and it isn't appreciated. But then you do some dinky off-hand thing straight out of a manual and the pointy-haired B-school bozos carry on for a week about what a great thing you did. That's what drives burn-out, when you have to ask yourself, "Why am I bothering to do this? Why am I bothering to try to do my best when, time after time, I'm not rewarded for it?" Someone else objected to the carrot and stick. At one place, a new general manager called all of the SW product developers in for a speech. He wanted to make sure we all knew that meeting release dates is important, but his approach was to say, "If we're a month late, it costs us $12M." or whatever. So I had to ask him whether we'd all get a cut of the $12M if we got the product out a month ahead of time. He did not answer in the affirmative.

1ndy
1ndy

The IT consulting firm I work for has set up their bonus program so the only way you can get a bonus is to put in an exorbitant amount of overtime helping with sales leads, proposals, interviews, taking classes, conducting classes, and even their sanctioned community activities. Thinks its fair? They even encourage you to give up your vacation time to gain more points for a bonus, but its not guaranteed. A "former" coworker gave up his vacation only to have the bonus range chart change so he was a couple points short of a bonus...and no, they wouldn't give it to him.

petermcc
petermcc

I have probably worked my last IT contract after seeing how unrealistic expectations have become the norm. Subcontract into, say HP, often is via one or more small IT businesses and each needs their cut. Some of these businesses are quite happy to delay payment for months or worse, promise to honor reimbursements then not deliver and hope you will not expend the effort to chase them down. The health implications have me earning a wage outside IT and no intention of risking working with the "fly by nighters". Now the satisfaction comes from turning down work and referring them to previous misdemeanors, but I feel sorry for the folk who have house payments and need the cashflow. The only way this will be corrected will be when there is a shortage of engineers and sadly in Australia the dodgy businesses can draw on a flooded Indian market to import cheap labor. I hate to think how long it will take to correct the imbalance with such an inexhaustible supply..

nick
nick

It took me a long time, and a heart attack to realise that I had all the balance wrong. If you are paid to work say 40 hours per week, and you put in 60 hours, you are devaluing your skills. I sat down one day and worked out that some of my staff, on a substantially lower wage than I were actually earning more on an hourly basis because they were not doing the stupid hours. No more stupid hours for me.

Odipides
Odipides

Still alive but ended up in hospital for three months. With respect to point 9, I was always on the receiving end of unrealistic expectations. Particularly when the sales director popped his head round the door claiming he'd pulled in a FANTASTIC deal invariably for something we didn't have/couldn't do. He must have been an alumni of the Dogbert school of sales management. Problem is that managers always flog a willing horse and trot out all the platitudes about how everyone is 'counting on you', 'we just need to make this last push'... Older and wiser now.

InnateDev
InnateDev

you have to get the balance right... no one expects this from you.

JohnOfStony
JohnOfStony

A few years ago when working from home first became practical, I went to the USA for a holiday (from the UK) and one of the first things I did was to connect mmy laptop and log in to the office - and it worked first time. A week later I tried logging in to check my email - no success. This didn't bother me as I knew that if anything urgent cropped up, they could phone me. When I got back, I told my boss about the problem and he told me he had disabled my login. "If you're on holiday, you're ON HOLIDAY" was what he said. So my boss understands the benefit of completely getting away for a break. On the subject of overnighters, I once spent a night in prison - working to get a security system operational before a government inspection the following morning - and I made it, just!

nat.hansen
nat.hansen

I will remember this analogy, Nice!

nick
nick

You are lucky. The other comments describing long hours, underpayment, under appreciation, loss of personal life are the norm. I have over 25 years in IT and worked with a large number of other IT professionals - you are in a good spot.

pjboyles
pjboyles

I just hate hearing "work smarter" because most people who tell you that are really saying work longer and get it all done after you point out that you are now way over tasked.

waltersokyrko
waltersokyrko

Pretend that you are a Project Manager scheduling someone else's time. You make a list in priority order of everything you have been assigned. You calculate effort in days and duration in days. When someone asks you to do one more thing, you bring out your list and you schedule it in together. They will soon see that the one more thing will be finished in 7 months (too late to be useful) or another important thing will be delayed until past the time it is required. Unfortunately, the one more thing will be given to someone who is less organised and will probably not deliver something. Fortunately or unfortunately, depending on your perspective, you will be promoted to manage IT.

Suresh Mukhi
Suresh Mukhi

I've been in IT all my life. I have been married for 15 years, have two kids. Yes, I do check my email while on holiday and call the office from time to time. They know it's part of the job.