Networking

I quit! 10 things that drove me out of IT

After six years of working as a remote support tech for a managed service provider, Jack Wallen threw in the towel. If you've ever been tempted to quit IT, his reasons may sound familiar.
hero
Image: iStockphoto.com/IvanBastien
 Some people assume that the world of PC support is a glamorous, Sheila E sort of life. After all, it's technology, geeking out all day long. What's not to love?

Famous last words.

For what seemed like an eternity, I served as a support tech for a managed service provider (MSP). Starting the job, I had no idea what I was getting into. As the saying goes, "If I knew then what I know now…." Would I have stepped foot into the world of remote support? It's hard to say. What is not so hard to say is why I eventually gave up being a support technician. In fact, I can give you 10 reasons why.

1: Stress

This is the number one reason why I left. If you've never experienced the levels of stress associated with managed service providers, you're in for a real treat. You have (possibly) hundreds of clients calling in all day to report their computers "aren't working." The queue lines up with people who can't get their work done because "you haven't fixed their problems." It's disaster management and triage all day and it never lets up.

2: Pay

The pay for an MSP engineer is not what you'd think it would be. I nearly exploded with laughter every time I heard a client say, "That's why you get paid the big bucks." I wanted to say, "You probably get paid more than I." But I refrained. Every time. The truth is, the pay just wasn't enough to offset the high levels of stress and frustration. It made more sense to move on.

3: Printers

Nearly half of what I did all day was fix printers. That's how I came to the conclusion that the very foundation of printing is broken. I never signed up to be a printer technician and would feel my blood boil every time I saw a support request come through that said, "My printers stopped printing!"

4: Ignorance

I hate to be one of "those people," even momentarily. Still, the levels of ignorance I dealt with on a daily basis were staggering. I was always professional, and I tried to be patient and kind. But fielding the same questions over and over — things as basic as, "What's a web browser?" — eventually wore me down.

5: Micromanaging

As a contract company, MSPs need their engineers working at 150 percent all day, every day, and each second must be accounted for and billed. So it's not surprising that they tend to micromanage the staff. Some people can handle this management technique. But it drove me mad to have someone breathing down my neck all day. There was also an avalanche of paperwork we had to do to ensure that we'd be covered in case of a disaster.

6: The pace

The world of PC support (especially of the remote flavor) can be boiled down to this: You have way too much to do, not enough time to do it, and not enough help to get it done. And as that workload piles up, you have angry clients who can't get their own work done. To accommodate this, you have to work at a pace you can't maintain for any length of time (which leads us back to #1: stress).

7: Windows

I've always been upfront about my opinion that Microsoft Windows is the reason tech support is so busy. I mentioned that half of my job was fixing printers. The other half seemed to be malware and viruses. Every day I fought the urge to blurt out, "If you used Linux or Mac, you wouldn't have these problems and you'd save a ton of money!" But I refrained. Every time. If you've experienced the stability and reliability of "the other platforms," you get this. You don't want to spend your day supporting Windows. You'd rather spend a portion of your day training users on another platform and watching them work happily ever after.

8: Multitasking madness

I am a multitasker. I often have two to three major tasks running at once. I'll be writing a tech piece, a work of fiction, and getting intense on social media. But the problem with working directly in IT is that you get your head buried in something you've been told is critical... only to be yanked from that task to do something like fix a printer for a CEO. You come back to the original task(s) and find your flow completely ruined and you're back to square one. This happens more often than not, and you lose a lot of work as a result.

9: The love of technology

It can be tricky when your work intersects with something you're passionate about. For me, technology is one such passion. But having to deal with tech issues (often caused by user-error or platform inadequacies) day in and day out was starting to ruin it. I even began to hate it. That caused serious problems for me, as I had to go home and toil away in front of a computer to create works of fiction, which is something that usually brings me great joy. It wasn't until I left the support industry that I regained my love for technology.

10: Burnout

There is no avoiding this. You will burn out. The pace and stress tend to remain neck and neck in the race to subvert your sanity. Working support will eventually take you down. And (at least for me), you'll find yourself carrying that stress home with you. You'll go through periods where that stress doesn't seem to want to wash down the drain and it turns you inside out. For me, that was too big a price to pay.

The last straw

Not every company and not every person is cut from the same cloth. There are those out there who will gladly tolerate what, in the end, sent me packing. I am also not pointing any fingers at any one company. Ultimately, the killing blow was my own lack of resilience and my inability to keep up with the choking pace of the managed service provider industry.

Also read…

Your take

Do IT departments need to rethink how they provide desktop support? Or is it just a matter of hiring people who can withstand the pressure and pace of a high-stress industry?  Share your thoughts with fellow TechRepublic members.

 

 

About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

194 comments
hermanbrood
hermanbrood

That's the big problem with IT. IT does not have emotions. People do. That is why these two elements do not, and never will work together seamlessly. Questions people ask: "Yesterday it was working, and today it is not!! How the ** is that possible?"


But the fun thing is, they never ask this question when their car broke down.


IT brings stress. Even bigger stress to people who do not understand it. They wait, while they look frustrated and are ticking their fingers on the desk, while 100's of letters are automatically generated. And they complain that the process is taking 10 minutes.


One phrase but them back on track: "Try typing 100 letters manually in 10 minutes."


To be an IT engineer is a big challenge and you need to actually see problems as a challenge. You have to be stress resistant (factor 100, or even 1000). If you are not, the stress will smash you into pieces mentally. I've seen a lot of colleagues go like this. In my opinion IT-staff is severely underpaid, because the stress in combination with a lot of sitting will take a lot years from their lives.  


There's a lot of frustration in your article. For example, you are pointing to Windows or malware. But the real problem are the people that are using IT incorrectly and how you handle all their complaints in your mind. The problem is not Windows or malware. Windows, or any other OS just does what the people are ordering it to do. And that includes installing malware or installing a wrong printer driver for instance.


Sorry for my bad english ;-)

rimpac99
rimpac99

Half of your troubles is due to problems caused by Windows? Very interesting.

Britisch
Britisch

The root of the problem here, as I see it, is the "work for someone else" mentality.  I run my own technology business; technically an ITSM company, so a lot of what I do is local and on-site.  #2 (pay) is something you negotiate on an individual basis;  #4 (ignorance) becomes a payday; #5 (micromanagement) becomes something you're in charge of; #6 (pace) is something you set -- the faster, the more the money; and #7 (Windows) becomes a cash cow, not a burden.


For those who don't want to spend all their money on fixes, steer them towards Apple.  Then you can make money training people instead of fixing their problems.  That's actually much more fun!


Incidentally, Windows 8 is about enough to drive me out of the business.  I can't in good conscience install this on a productivity machine.

RMSx32767
RMSx32767

One of the problems is that support is considered an entry level position leading to a "real job". That's why the pay is low and the turnover high. It (support) requires an unique combination of attributes; a combination of people skills and technical ability. If business, and technology, wised-up and treated support as a career path on its own they would attract and retain EXTREMELY competent staff. Instead they hire almost anyone then wonder why folks don't want to call support, and why support believes most users are ID10Ts.

macmadman
macmadman

I spent 12 years doing telephone support and I pretty much agree with all 10 points, except maybe #7. I worked 9 years for a Macintosh software company, and I can't remember how many times I heard "What's an icon?" People have heard that the Macintosh is so easy to use, so they don't invest anything in training. Salespeople perpetuate this, since they get their commission on the sale and leave the training to underpaid and overworked support departments.


Telephone support may be one of the worst jobs in the world. If I knew then what I was getting myself into, I doubt I'd have taken the job and even if I had I sure wouldn't have stayed at it so long. Getting away from phone support was a huge relief.

JCAlford
JCAlford

I'll say the inverse of #7, not enough Windows.  My company uses a hodgepodge of software frankenstiened together to work.  My department director thinks he's saving money this way.  It came as quite a shock to him when, at last year's True Up with MS, he found out the MS licenses we already had would pay for most of the MS software he insisted were "too expensive."  In other words, his hatred of MS cost the company hundreds of thousands of dollars because he atomatically assumed they were expensive and bought another companies product that we then had to make work with our frankenstien system.  If he would have started with MS offerings we would have paid less in actual dollars and a boatload less in soft dollars.

Now we're starting to migrate off of the other stuff and on to MS. 

unclefish
unclefish

I agree with all 10 points the author made with the surprising exception of #7. Perhaps because I am so used to the issues with Windows but also with the fixes. I found it more maddening dealing with issues that cropped up with iOS. Like they would do an iOS update for the IPhones & IPads and it would brick the email accounts for everyone. A couple of occasions the only fix was to delete the account from the device and set it back uo again. All well and good but the customer would be pissed because they just lost all the saved emails they wanted to have. At least with Windows you could usually work around that without them losing everything. I too am ex IT because the low pay just isn't worth the aggravation especially being treated like an infant by your employer. I understand why because I was way older than most of my co-workers who well knowing tech very well left a lot to be desired in the maturity and reliability / work ethic dept. Even so when you don't need to be watched all the time it does wear you down after a while. Glad I am out of it and doubt I'll ever go back.



EphiICT
EphiICT

@KarlX When I was in high school computer was my first choice to learn at university level. It is now frustrating me without any benefit. Even I have no money to appear at doctor. IT is very difficult. It is playing a game with machine. It is very wide. I have the passion for film. Believe me I will leave IT and go to film making.

KarlX
KarlX

Mr. Wallen said everything I was complaining about after I burned out too.  When I got into IT, I was in my 30's.  It was an exciting time learning new things, becoming an expert, and being paid well for it.  Fast forward to my mid 40's, I worked for a fast growing company with zero tolerance for ANY down time.  I couldn't keep up with technology or 24 hour stress.  I ended up with debilitating adrenal fatigue, insomnia and depression. I hated technology and life.  IT is a young man's sport.  I'm thrilled to have gotten out alive, and will NEVER go back.

viProCon
viProCon

Side note:  This TechRepublic comments tool has some good functionality but it still needs basic improvement.  I made a lot of typo's in my post so I think I went back and edited it about 4 or 5 times.  At the bottom it says something like  "edit in 4 minutes" or whatever.  This timer is not at all accurate, as 5 minutes after my initial edit, a box popped up (upon clicking Post Comment) saying my timer had expired, even though my most recent edit had said I still had 4 minutes and it was a one-word typo correction so was done in maybe 20 seconds after I spotted the word.  Anyway, just a gripe as the TR comments thingy has needed some fixing for months now.  Maybe just needs somebody o know about it for it to be fixed though. 

viProCon
viProCon

We're all stuck in this world of technology too immature to be of any real use to the common man.  It's still exploding, month after month every company chasing a dollar is scrambling to make something new, make it as best as you can but most importantly "make it now!", get it to market .  Support engineers are there to clean up the mess, and what a mess it is.  The incompetence ultimately is the industry itself, not any given company, CEO, middle-manager, or employee.  We're all invested in this mess just by being willing to take a paycheck.  It's unfortunate but at least it's not war or something worse - it's just human progression.  We're not mature enough yet to curb this trend but the day will come when the system breaks, or morphs into something better.  It's very Darwinian in nature, unfortunately.  Oddly, we have the ability to supersede Darwinism and CHOOSE to make things better, but that also can only be done by manipulating the thinking of leaders, or as a collective large enough to facilitate that change.  


Time heals all wounds and time will, one way or another, heal this one.  It sucks that people have to suffer in the meantime though.   


Anyway, back to earth for a moment.  The one and only thing that tethers a support enginner to his/her job is the need for a paycheck.  If not for that, as soon as it's too much you leave.  As soon as you realize your idiot boss isn't willing to support you the way you need it, you leave.  As soon as you've had enough of the absolute stupidity of people in this world that use their computers, you leave. 


In lieu of that, bide your time and take steps to get out into something better.  I did exactly that.  I still support users but now it's on a more limited basis while I also do other things in IT.  And I am lucky in that I like the people I support.  They still do things that indicate they lack sufficient computer knowledge, but since I'm not stressed out nearly as much, I don't hate them for their ignorance. 


Tech support is simply not a sustainable profession for the long term, it does not matter who you are.  Most people in this type of position don't want to admit it, but it is unfortunately true.  Unless you can completely detach, of course.  So as I said, if you're one such person in a stressful support role, it helps your morale a lot to make plans to move up and on.  Yes, this might mean off-hours devotion tot hat effort but that's the alternative, keep being unhappy?  A person can do whatever they put their mind to, but they have to realize that they HAVE TO PUT THEIR MIND TO IT.  Everything else will follow. 





V.H. Scarpacci
V.H. Scarpacci

I can really relate.  After 34 years in the field I have decided to move to the country buy my own low tech business.  Stress probably won't go down over all, but at least it will be a different set of problems.

walldorff
walldorff

#7 is true, from every angle.

bobp
bobp

Number 8 is the one that really bugged me - even when I explained to the client that they should not touch the computer until I came back to see the results of the malware scan, they would use the computer anyway, making me have to start over. The other thing that really bugged me was, when I tried to explain some maintenance basics to the user (like updating and running anti-malware programs regularly), was that it went in one ear and out the other. They didn't listen and didn't even understand the basics of how a computers works!

It is as if I were a mechanic trying to fix a car which hadn't been serviced for 50K miles and then the owner expects me to make it run right without any big expense. Maybe if you did BASIC maintenance .... !

RDWII
RDWII

While I sympathize regarding the various points, I have always been somewhat amazed hat "IT" gets a bad name because of those who are in the "IT Support" arena burning out.  As far as I am concerned, IT Support is to IT as Admitting Clerks are to Medical Staff at a hospital.  Yes, you deal with IT _equipment_ and users but I've taught secretaries who were "Power Users" to do a lot of the first level "IT Support" activities.  I've also dealt with IT Support staff who were obviously following a script ("Have you tried rebooting your system?") and had to explain that sometimes there are issues that simply don't follow their script.


Desktop Support needs to be recruited for the skills that the position requires and, yes, among those are patience, tolerance of "silly users", as well as decent knowledge of the desktop applications in use by the firm.  Unless there is TRULY a path of advancement from Desktop Support to IT positions, there shouldn't be any pretense that those in Desktop Support are part of the IT department except in the same peripheral way that the guys who physically set up computers on the users' desks are. 

jeffreyhamby
jeffreyhamby

"If you used Linux or Mac, you wouldn't have these problems and you'd save a ton of money!" But I refrained.

As well you should have.  If Linux or Mac had the marketshare Windows does, you would be dealing with viruses on their machines.  Malware's biggest play in getting onto a machine.. making an user think it's not malware.  Buffer overruns are rare anymore.

Windows isn't great, and I'm mostly a Kubuntu user myself.  But thinking malware is a Windows problem rather than a user problem is a bit naive.
DimBulb
DimBulb

If Wallen would only give up journalism, we could all be happy.  Is there a job out there that does not have it's own form of stress?  I doubt it. Grow up Jack!

Coss71
Coss71

I love this question at the end:

"Do IT departments need to rethink how they provide desktop support? Or is it just a matter of hiring people who can withstand the pressure and pace of a high-stress industry?

No.  They need to start getting end users to HAVE to learn some of it.  I had end users that flat out told me "why should I learn anything about a computer when all I have to do is pick up the phone or send an email and you'll fix it for me.  They are LAZY!  I have no idea how many times I held classes in offices, sent out written warnings and posted sheets around offices says "Don't open attachments unless you have at least read the whole email first".  Guess how many would remember this?  If you said maybe 1% you would be over by .9%

I blamed the office managers because they would never discipline or enforce the company policies.

"Aww you infected your machine?"  "Ok we'll get support to fix it".  Then they call support and read me the riot act because their employee can't do their job.


I have been in IT for over 25 years (18 of which have been tied to Title and Escrow) and it has always been the same.  The managers/bosses see the employee as money coming in, and IT as money going out; IT is just an evil that costs money but we can't work without it.  Gee what a nice way to treat the people that give them the tools to be able to make money.


<Gee can you sense a bit of bitterness from me?>  I am another that is past the point of being able to withstand the abuse any longer and have retired.


mrdelurk
mrdelurk

"3. Printers"

So thougthful of the writer to not say directly, "HP Printers".

raymondh3201
raymondh3201

This is much the same here where I work. As for Mr. Wallens comments on The Last Straw;

"The last straw

Not every company and not every person is cut from the same cloth. There are those out there who will gladly tolerate what, in the end, sent me packing. I am also not pointing any fingers at any one company. Ultimately, the killing blow was my own lack of resilience and my inability to keep up with the choking pace of the managed service provider industry."

Everyone has a breaking point. It does not matter how resilient one is, Just when their burn out point comes. It doesn't matter if you think you have control or not. Sooner or later everyone comes to this point.

And there's not anything anyone can do because the company and management do not care as long as their bottom line is met. The employee's come in last.

Food for thought for any place.

Poli Tecs
Poli Tecs

Well you're nit in tech anymore because you are a MORON!

EX: 7: Windows

I have managed Windows based networks for more than 20 years and to say malware and viruses were a "daily" issue means your IT is incompetent. Especially with Windows XP thru 8!

And to say if they had Linux or Apple they would save a lot of money tells me you're more than incompetent and are no longer a tech because you would know that such a stupid statement means the costs would have skyrocketed due to more incompatibility and inability to run business level apps!

No, you're not a tech anymore because you were never a tech to begin with. All your excuses I have seen a million times and its simply that you are not cut out for the job.

lastchip
lastchip

It's a rat race! I'm glad to see you've regained your sanity.


Ultimately, it comes down to company's bidding ever lower prices to get the contracts. They then expect their staff to get them out of the mire. 


Not for me - won't touch it with a barge pole. It's insane.

Pooua
Pooua

I spent ten years working in an internal call center for a large subsidiary of a major company. I worked with hundreds of other call center technicians on dozens of client projects. Several of my former colleagues came from other call center corporations. 

When I first started working at the company, I liked my job a lot. The pay was decent, the work was fulfilling and we won awards and appreciation from the client. That didn't last long. I found myself on the most hideous contract of my time at the company, an absolute nightmare supporting client stores directly. Fortunately, that contract was so bad that it killed itself. Then, the problem became pay stagnation. We had a pay and hiring freeze half the time I was at the company. Advancement opportunities were limited. The workload kept increasing, and then one of the muckety-mucks decided that everyone--whether Logistics, Dispatch or Call Management--needed to cross-train, so everyone would always be busy with someone's job. Of course, no pay raises for the extra job responsibilities.

Extremelydangerous
Extremelydangerous

By moving things to UNIX, this result in

1) No virus

2) NO printer driver (every machine uses postscript)

3) Never breaks, 

4) Users can only work with the computer,

5) Unix boots DISKLESS, so you have only one version of the sistem for the company

6) You need to mantain only the server, that is cheapper as there is no licences to pay

7) buy in ebay a supermicro (TM) with 2TB of memory and about 6TB of disk, so you can run 300 users, install UNIX ONLY ONCE, and all the users will use it, as there is only ONE server, that runs all the users, so there is only ONE printer manager (CUPS) to deal with all the printers. 

8) put all the printers in the network (ethernet) never on the desktop usb or printer port. 

9) if it is not possible(8), boot UNIX on small machines (diskless) and connect the printers in this machine, cups does the dirty job than.

10) if a printer does not runs on UNIX, sell the printer and buy another who does postscript..of IJS (hp) language...


Linux is good, but changes too fast, requires a complicated and cumbersome setup to run diskless

Unix is conservative (it is still in gnome2 and will stay there for a LOONG time), it is like the old and faithfull XP, does the job, easy to operate, you only need a mouse...

Slowly move the company to UNIX, hire persons that DOES not know UNIX and

barely knows windows, put them in front of a gnome2 interface, in 3 hours they 

are operating the computer, Here my daughter (8 years old) did, without any training

so why cannot an adult do??

If you hire slowly persons to work on UNIX, they have less knowledge, so they

costs less. to do the same thing. 

steve
steve

I hate to tell you but many jobs by professionals suck or are stressful. Unfortunate the times are so financially driven and it seems the day doesn't end at times.


Early in my career, a boss of mine asked me how I was worth per year. Thankfully before I could answer, he popped out "$10,000 a year is all EVERYONE is worth working. The amount of crap/stress/bad hours you are willing to tolerate determines the amount over 10k you could make". It was a great lesson early on.


Notice I also said could because it helps to be motivated to learn, grow and evolve. I manage a MSP and some of our inherited clients have basic A/V installs and no custom policies/exclusions (so they get more spyware), no Group Policies (so users can accidentally cause issues) and no documentation (IT shoots themselves in the foot and blames clients).


I have tried to find clients who are well-organized, having great internal project management and highly trained end users but those are the firms that don't need our help. I learned a long time ago to not blame my clients and find something I enjoy and can make a difference at. I truly enjoy technology and love helping people learn more about it. I love learning something new every day.


That makes IT not as long of a day. But, if I just was doing for the money, I could see how I would struggle to last a year.    

dehartyz
dehartyz

Ok, I understand and know all about your frustration.  However, ISP or Tech support in general should be a critical starting point for anyone who works in I.T.  Yes, its stressful. Yes you deal with ....some individuals who should only be allowed to write with a chisel and rock. Yes, Tier I or II tech support pay for an ISP or MSP is way low for the number of calls you take (overhead and administrative cost eat into our checks). Yes, Windows has many issues (because its popular, everyone wants to be or take down the popular kid on the block). But, those skills you acquired while doing MSP/ISP tech support are simply invaluable.  Why?


1. You have learned time management, many I.T pro's in the field lack time management.  They focus on an issue while other more important issues pile up rather than prioritizing by time of resolve and importance. 

 2. Pay is low because there are many who can do the same job (outsourcing).  You take the skills and use them to help you advance to the next level, such as business support.

 3. Windows has problems, yes, but how much of the world businesses use Windows???? I have worked in several high paying corporate and government jobs, Windows is here to stay. Linux is not user friendly (I love Linux, but I will not force a computer illiterate person to use it) and MAC systems (not the OS) are too expensive and contain too many limitations. This is why Windows has always been seen as a "business" PC and MAC as creative while Linux is for us super geeks.  Though many DB's are built on Linux and Unix, thats on the back end, normal user's don't care about the back end they want what is easy and what works.

4. Tech support jobs are baptism through fire.  You have proven you can handle significant stress and can efficiently work under a giant amount of pressure.  


I work with both people who have done the Tech support call center jobs and those who haven't. The ones who haven't (for a lack of a better word) SUCK. They get stressed over piddly things and have a hard time managing work loads.  Jack you are among the elite, you have skills that can enterprises drool over.  If you lived close, I'd tell my company to pick you up now.  Surviving 6 years in call center support makes you a valuable tool. I only took the abuse for 2 years, and not all at one time. The longest was for a huge internet provider, but those learned skills made me even more of an asset.  


What will set you ahead of the rest is what you do while you are doing call center support, meaning, are you continuing to learn so you can move ahead? I hold several industry certifications and degrees, those do not teach you tack and customer service skills.  Those are learned from call center's.  I applaud you for your years of service, tech support is not easy, under appreciated, but a vital service to PC user's everywhere.




michael.george
michael.george

You nearly lost me at 1. You definitely lost me at 7:

7: Windows

I've always been upfront about my opinion that Microsoft Windows is the reason tech support is so busy. I mentioned that half of my job was fixing printers. The other half seemed to be malware and viruses. Every day I fought the urge to blurt out, "If you used Linux or Mac, you wouldn't have these problems and you'd save a ton of money!"

Objective? No

Even vaguely accurate? No

Writer has even the vaguest clue about how corporate IT works? No 

There's probably a very good reason you were left on remote support for 6 years....

macmanjim
macmanjim

I agree with the author 100%. I've been in IT almost 20 years and I am burnt out. What can I do? The pay stinks, the work stinks, and it never changes or gets better. There has to be a better way and better than the plethora of low paying service jobs. 

nvgtoga02
nvgtoga02

Funny, I don't remember writing this article after I quit my IT Support job last October, yet it almost perfectly describes my experience and sentiments.  Well done, Jack!

jelabarre
jelabarre

Tempted to leave IT????   Heck, I'm trying to find how to transfer my skills to some non-IT field so I **CAN** leave.

kv0105
kv0105

Damn true... I too quit

Hlope
Hlope

Sorry Jack, but I do understand. After being made redundant, I have spent five years studying while doing PC repairs, etc. I was very proud that I eventually could advertise myself as an A+, N+, CCENT, MCITP certified tech. After all that time and effort I still have not found gainful employment even at the lowest level. Half the people I studied with already had jobs. I have now changed my career path to a painter decorator and have found it much more rewarding.

hermanbrood
hermanbrood

@Britisch  Watch out, holding on to old stuff nearly blew Kodak out of existence.

Jabailey325
Jabailey325

@Britisch You can't even count to 7 correctly, I won't be recommending you to fix anything !!

kernal_panic2000
kernal_panic2000

@unclefish if they lost emails because they had delete the account and reset it up its because they are stupid and set it up as POP instead of IMAP. If email is that important they need to be using  Exchange.

tbmay
tbmay

@RDWII  Agree.  But they are typically recruited with only one consideration.  Put a cheap butt in a chair and use the false hope of advancement as a tool for doing so.

kernal_panic2000
kernal_panic2000

@jeffreyhamby Says someone who is ignorant of the way both of those OSes work. Linux runs nearly 1/2 the servers on the internet yet they don't suffer the worms, tojans, and malware windows does.

tbmay
tbmay

@jeffreyhamby  I've noticed most people who think "Linux" is what everyone should be using are "Linux" hobbyist.  Not people who have ever had an actual role as a unix/linux engineer in any real work environment.   "Linux" (a misuse of the term because it's a kernel, not a complete OS) is most certainly NOT perfect.  These folks would not enjoy the real unix role because you aren't installing the latest ubuntu and playing with cool things.  You have to do real work and you better know your shell scripting, db management, etc.


Most vulnerabilities these days are going to attack applications, not the OS itself.  So the segregation that has traditionally made unix systems ("Linux" included) pretty secure is losing it's usefulness.  In other words, if I run apache under it's own user with access to only what it needs to run, and someone successfully attacks apache, and that's all they want to do, it doesn't matter if apache is isolated from the broader OS.  The attacker did what he meant to do.


On the broader topic, I've been in IT in numerous roles for a long time now.  I most definitely would not be interested in a help desk job.  It is unlikely most people in those roles will experience career growth.  For that matter, people in other IT roles need to evaluate what the cloud/virtualization/numerous other cheap options are going to do for/to their careers and adjust accordingly. 



bobp
bobp

@DimBulb Your moniker fits you. You have obviously never done support for any length of time. It is amazing how stupid and ignorant computer users can be. They often willfully refuse to learn anything to make their computers run better.

bobp
bobp

@Poli Tecs You assume Jack was given the authority to set the client computers up properly so they wouldn't get infected. You assume a lot.

Pooua
Pooua

@michael.george Yeah, he's off the mark about Windows. The only reason that Macs and Linux don't have as many viruses is that they don't have as many people using them. A lot more Macs than Linux boxes have viruses, too. Even though I'm trained in all the recent desktop operating systems, I hate using modern Macs and Linux boxes.

Pooua
Pooua

@Hlope I earned CompTIA A+, Network+ and Security+ certification three years ago, at a cost of $400 in testing center fees (besides the cost of study materials, night classes, etc). I might have managed to earn that much money over the last three years by having those certifications. I could have earned about as much money without them as with them, which, as it turns out, isn't much.

DimBulb
DimBulb

@bobp @DimBulb  I've been in a technical repair and support role since 1977, probably before you were born. Whining about the people that make your job possible is immature and counter-productive to remaining employed.

333239
333239

@bobp @DimBulb If computer users were not 'ignorant and stupid' then we wouldn't need IT support people, that's the job. People won't change, and support techs who blame the users are right, but if you want them to change and make your life easier then maybe you are in the wrong job, otherwise you have to develop a system to cope with them. It's like paramedics blaming their job woes on people who walk out in front of buses.

tbmay
tbmay

@Pooua @Hlope  Ha.  I have a rule learned the hard way.  I will not get a certification unless an employer tells me he or she is paying for it and it is required any more.  I have rhce and Sec+ to satisfy DoD requirements from contract work, but I don't advise anyone to go out and spend their time and money on certs unless they have a very good reason to any more.  They are not as valuable as they used to be.  There are too many of them, and too many people with them, for them to help you much.  I would advise people to look at the the job they want and and get what's required for it.  Don't just up and say, "I'm going to get (fill in your cert of choice here) because I think it will get me a job."  

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