Software

The 10 biggest Office 2010 annoyances

Even when you like a software package, certain aspects of it may bug you. Deb Shinder shares her list of the most vexing Office 2010 features.

Even when you like a software package, certain aspects of it may bug you. Deb Shinder shares her list of the most vexing Office 2010 features.


In some ways, it might seem that I'm the wrong person to write this article. I've been working with Office 2010 every day since the early betas, and I like it a lot. In fact, way back before it was available to the public, I wrote about 10 cool features to look forward to in Office 2010. But every software package has its annoying aspects, and Office 2010 is no exception. Although many of the changes make it easier to perform common tasks, there are times when you just shake your head and wonder, "Why did they do that?" In this piece, I'll look at the dark side of Office 2010 and those little things that annoy me (and other Office users).

Note: This article is also available as a PDF download.

1: There are too many editions (but not enough choices)

It's good to have choices, but when it comes to software, many users wish vendors would subscribe to the KISS ("keep it simple, sweetheart") philosophy. One of the biggest complaints about Windows Vista and then Windows 7 was the number of editions you have to choose from. Office has developed the same problem: How do you figure out which edition has what you need? You can have Home and Student edition (Word, PowerPoint, Excel, and OneNote), Office Home and Business (which adds Outlook), Office Professional (which adds Access and Publisher), or Office Professional Plus (which adds SharePoint Workspace and InfoPath and is available only through volume licensing).

On the other hand, some might say there aren't enough choices (or the choices aren't configured correctly). What if you want Word, Excel, OneNote, and Outlook but don't need PowerPoint? What if you want Publisher but have no need for Access or Excel? What if you want SharePoint Workspace but your company isn't big enough for volume licensing? Sure, you could buy the individual applications, but that ends up costing more. How about a "cafeteria plan," where you pay X dollars for X number of applications and you get to pick the applications? Just an idea.

When it comes to putting together a suite of software programs, you can please some of the people some of the time -- and the rest of the people are likely to be annoyed.

2: The cost is steep, with no upgrade price

At $499 for the full boxed edition of Office Professional, the software is considered to be just too expensive by many users -- especially when Open Office, which has some of the same functionality, is available free. But it's not just that the prices are high -- it's that they're confusing, too. For instance, the Professional Academic edition has the same programs as the regular Pro edition but costs $400 less. Teaching might not pay so well, but sometimes it carries nice perks.

For any particular package, you have the options of full price (boxed retail, which allows you to install Office on two computers) and the "key card" price, which is the cost for a single-license card with a key that lets you unlock the software that's preloaded on machines by the OEMs. What you don't have is an "upgrade" (discounted) price for those who already have a previous version of Office installed. And that has many users very annoyed.

3: Color schemes are limited (and ugly)

The color scheme might seem like a little thing, but to me -- and a number of other Office 2010 users I've heard from -- the new and definitely not improved offering of color schemes is a major annoyance, especially in Outlook. I used the black color scheme in Office 2007 and it worked well for me. The borders were a crisp black but the backgrounds were all white, including that of the left folder pane. Now the true black option is gone. There is an option called Black, but it's really a muddy gray, and it turns both the left folder pane and the right Today pane dark with white text. This makes them harder to read and, frankly, a lot less attractive. If some people like that, it's fine to make it an option. But why not leave the old color schemes as options, too? There's no reason we should be limited to just three choices here, anyway. That's just plain annoying.

4: Recent docs are buried Backstage

In Office 2007 Word, Excel, and PowerPoint applications, clicking the big Office button invoked a relatively compact menu with items such as New, Open, Save, and Print in the left pane. Recent Documents were handily displayed in the right pane.

In the final release of Office 2010, the Office button is gone. Instead, we have the File tab. It looks just like the rest of the Ribbon tabs but instead of taking you to a Ribbon bar, clicking it opens up Backstage view -- which has three panes and takes up much more space.

By default, to see your recent documents, you have to go to Backstage view and click Recent in the left pane. There is a way to change this: At the bottom of the list of recent documents, you'll see the Quickly Access This Number Of Recent Documents check box, with a drop-down box to set the number. After you enable this option, your recent docs will show up in the left pane of the Backstage view. But it's annoying that this option is not more obvious.

5: Outlook gets the blue (or silver or "black") Ribbon

In Office 2007, Microsoft introduced the Ribbon to most Office programs -- and received a lot of negative user backlash for it -- but Outlook retained the traditional menus and toolbars. With Office 2010, the Ribbon comes to Outlook, too, and that's sure to annoy all those anti-Ribbon activists out there. Personally, I like the Ribbon interface most of the time, but I am annoyed that it has resulted in problems like the next one in this list.

6: Add-ins: Go to the back of the line

With Outlook 2007, when I installed an add-in such as Twinbox (which lets you compose and send Twitter updates from Outlook), the Twinbox toolbar was added to the interface along with the regular Outlook toolbars. It was right there, whenever I wanted it. In Outlook 2010, at first I thought it didn't install properly because the toolbar didn't appear. Finally, I found it. You have to click the Add-Ins tab every time you want to use it. Again, this brings an extra step and a little bit of extra annoyance to the user experience.

7: Newest is on top -- still

My biggest overall annoyance with Office 2010 would have to be those previous annoyances that Micrsoft had the opportunity to fix... and didn't. The "newest on top" phenomenon has been a pet peeve of mine with various versions of Outlook. Blogs, with their newest posts at the top of the page, may have started this trend of putting the newest of everything at the top of the page. Maybe I'm just old fashioned, but I like to go from top to bottom, with the oldest messages at the top and the newest at the bottom. By default, Outlook (still) does it the other way around.

It's easy to click the column header and reverse that, within a folder. But why is there no way to change this setting on a global basis? When you have dozens of folders, it's really annoying to have to go through and reset every one of them to the "right" display. Invariably, there is some folder I rarely access and haven't changed, and then I open it and am at first confused because things are not in the right order. So then I'm annoyed that I have to change it yet again.

8: Upload Center takes center stage

Office 2010 is integrated with the free Office Web Apps, which can be very handy if you need to work at a public computer that doesn't have Office installed. However, if you don't use Web Apps, you might be annoyed by the Upload Center icon that Office 2010 puts in the notification area (system tray) of your taskbar. Upload Center auto-starts by default when you boot the OS, so even if you uncheck the option to display it, it will run and take up valuable system resources. If you want to disable it completely, open the system configuration tool (msconfig.exe) and uncheck Microsoft Office 2010 on the Startup tab.

9: 64-bit can be a hindrance

Office 2010 is the first version of Microsoft Office to come in a 64-bit version. The 64-bit version can take advantage of the larger virtual and physical memory capacity of today's 64-bit processors and operating systems. This is especially useful if you need to use large Excel spreadsheets (more than 2GB in size).

Although the 32-bit version is the default, due to compatibility issues, it's a good bet that many power users will install the 64-bit version. However, you may find that your favorite add-ins don't work with the 64-bit version. ActiveX Controls and add-ins written for 32-bit Office don't work in the 64-bit process. And although we expect 64-bit to equal better performance, you may find graphics rendering is actually slower with 64-bit Office because of the lack of support for Intel's MMX technology on 64-bit. In addition, the Windows Mobile Device Center doesn't synchronize with the 64-bit version of Outlook 2010.

Another problem is that you can't install 64-bit Office if you have any 32-bit Office programs installed. This means you have to uninstall your 32-bit Visio, for instance. And you can't install 32-bit PowerPoint 2010 (to get Flash support) alongside 64-bit Excel (for large file support).

64-bit is the future, but you might not be ready just yet for the annoyances that come along with the more "futuristic" version of Office 2010.

10: Social networking integration falls short

Sometimes, the biggest annoyance in a new version of software is the disconnect between what the new features could be and what they actually deliver. A good example in Office 2010 is the social networking integration in Outlook. It's a lovely idea: Check out your friends' updates in the People Pane at the bottom of their email messages. The problem is that it's really designed to work with SharePoint 2010, so if your company doesn't use SharePoint, some of those great features don't work.

Yes, there are social connectors for other social networks, such as LinkedIn, Facebook, and Windows Live. And after you jump through some hoops -- install an updated version of the Social Connector and then download and install the connector for each social network -- you can see your friends' status updates in the People Pane. What you can't do is do anything with that information. This would have been so much better if they had provided a way to comment on or "like" updates or post your own updates from within Outlook.

Summary

I like Office 2010 and I use it every day. In most ways, it's a big improvement over its predecessors -- but as with anything new, there are still some annoying aspects. Let's hope Microsoft addresses them in the next version.

About

Debra Littlejohn Shinder, MCSE, MVP is a technology consultant, trainer, and writer who has authored a number of books on computer operating systems, networking, and security. Deb is a tech editor, developmental editor, and contributor to over 20 add...

31 comments
Julia Y.
Julia Y.

There is no Print Preview in Excel 2010. There is a major annoyance to add to your list. well, not in the way it existed before. If you create shortcuts in your QAT, they will take you to Print Backstage (or go from File) which is almost empty and lost most of its functions both from 2003 and 2007 versions. Only after you discover an almost invisible link to Page Setup somewhere down, you get to see some of old features from 2003/7. There is no button to view margins and it is now impossible to make margins wider/narrower right in the Preview screen. Print preview shows everything only in black and white even if your spreadsheet has color. IMHO the "Backstage" is cumbersome (takes up the whole screen and doesn't budge), it is filled with information that I do not need to see before the file even opens up and it just gets stuck there adding extra movements for my mouse, wrist and clicking finger. Question to MS developers or whoever can answer - when I move down from one line to next under File - from Save to Save as to Open etc., why do I have to do a separate step of an individual click on each command before I get related info which then takes up a whole screen and won't go away until I either click another command or move mouse to the (still-hated) ribbon? I don't need this information overload before I even opened my spreadsheet, this is distracting and, at this point in time, unnecessary. Wasn't it possible to keep it as it was in office 2003 - just scroll the mouse over all commands, without separate clicks on each, and whilst I'm hovering a bit longer over one command, say Recent, the list of recent files appears on the right side, without taking up the entire screen, AND it disappears when my cursor moves away. No need of separate movement of cursor to the far right, no need of separate click on close X sign. Simple, easy, elegant. Why was it necessary to kill the good thing and implant an ugly new thing instead? Is there a way at least to cut this "backstage" in half? There's nothing in Options. If you know how to do it, kindly advise. Thanks in advance???

cyberfrog96
cyberfrog96

Wow, I disagree with almost every single item on this list. Especially the color options (the new Black is way better) and the "new on top" (why would I want to sift through everything to find out the latest info). My coworkers and I have upgraded from 2007 and love it. Just goes to show you can't please everyone.

AtlantaTerry
AtlantaTerry

I suppose I should have looked before I jumped but I had no idea Microsoft Office REQUIRES one to be on the Internet before one can open an application such as Outlook. This is quite annoying. In my case because my roommate has contol of the wireless router and sometimes turns off the power strip in her room thereby killing my Internet connection. If I get home late at night and she is asleep in her room I really don't want to wake her up to have her turn on the power strip. (Yes, I know we should work this out but I'm just pointing out this weakness of the Office design.) What about someone who has Office 2010 installed on their laptop and needs to get work done in a cab or airplane and there is no wireless connectivity? (Not everyone has a wireless cell phone data plan!) Surely there has to be a way around this "feature". Deb, add this annoyance to your list as the 11th. Terry Thomas... the photographer Atlanta, Georgia USA www.TerryThomasPhotos.com

LogMonkay
LogMonkay

Biggest annoyances. normal.dot changed to add space after every paragraph. Same as in previous versions no way to set paste as plain text as default, but there are buttons on the paste dialog which make it easier during the edit process. If you have Office 2003 dump it and go to at least Office 2007. The ribbon takes a while to get used to but once you do, IMO you become more productive. Access 2010 is what Access 2007 should have been. It has lots of improvements that make your life easier. Price: Irrelevant if you are a corporate user. Ask your HR lady if your company is enrolled in the home use program that lets you pay 10 to 40 bucks for a copy of Office you can use at home.

LocoLobo
LocoLobo

The idea is to confuse the customer about #2 (cost). My real complaint isn't the number of different editions but the difficulty in figuring out which version does what. As to the rest of the list, nothing fatal, nothing good. Wouldn't keep me from upgrading, not much to upgrade for either.

mlewis
mlewis

1: There are too many editions (but not enough choices) - Not a problem for me (or most people/companies). Microsoft has the edition we want. 2: The cost is steep, with no upgrade price - I agree. This hurts. 3: Color schemes are limited (and ugly) - Doesn't matter to me. 4: Recent docs are buried Backstage - Yes, but when you start the software, they are available in only 1 click. After documents are open they are available in 2 clicks. Plus you get to "pin" your favorites so they never "roll off". Plus you get 20 documents in your list. 5: Outlook gets the blue (or silver or ?black?) Ribbon - Since my company is currently using Office 2003, the ribbon will be a training issue. Yes, it's unfamiliar, but I like it much better. Also, regarding screen real estate mentioned in a comment: In Office 2010, you can minimize the ribbon, and it turns into something that looks like the old menu system with the ribbon tabs becoming menu items. When you click on the "menu", instead of a menu dropping down, the ribbon drops down. 6: Add-ins: Go to the back of the line - Yes, I've had some compatibility issues with add-ins. 7: Newest is on top ? still - You can configure this any way you want. Just change the sort order in you view settings, and this will become the default for you. 8: Upload Center takes center stage - I did not experience this problem. 9: 64-bit can be a hindrance - I totally agree, but this not a problem for my company. 10: Social networking integration falls short - I agree that it could be better, but this is not an issue for my company. OK, so why will we upgrade: 1: Excel Power - Excel can now have a million rows, and virtually unlimited rows with PowerPivot. I have a PowerPivot Worksheet with almost 15 million rows. It is lightning fast. "Slicers" are incredibly powerful. We use lots of Excel Macros. 2: Compatibility - Yes, you can use a compatibility pack to get Office 2003 to read 2007 & 2010 documents, but you lose functionality, and some things just aren't compatible. You can't load a million-row workbook into Office 2003. We receive complex documents from many clients, and we need to keep up. 3: SharePoint - What started as an IT "toy" that nobody really understood has become a mission-critical application. We need to upgrade to the latest version, and it just works better with the corresponding version of Office. This allows for multiple people working in the same document at the same time.

Kent Lion
Kent Lion

The biggest annoyances in Office 2007 are that anyone who is an experienced user can no longer find many of the menu entries and buttons he/she knows, that they are no longer hidden in logical places (e.g., if it has to do with appearance, it's not necessarily in the view menu, there is no format menu...), and it takes more mousing to get the same thing done because replacing visible toolbars with tabbed ribbons makes switching ribbons a common requirement. Put simply, the experienced user is forced to relearn years of learning, and to break years of habits, to finally be worse off than before. From the sound of this article, Office 2010 is at least as bad. I guess Microsoft just doesn't care about their experienced users. However, there's a plus side to it; they've finally gotten me to look closely at Linux and Open Office. Unfortunately, Linux is still for hackers, and I'm one of the rare users who uses many advanced Office features that Open Office doesn't appear to have...yet. I think time will eventually change that, now that Microsoft is moving backwards with their products.

NexS
NexS

And I frown upon 'Twittering' from Outlook. Seriously, you've got it on your wankphone(I mean iPhone), your wankpad, home paged on your internet browser - so why do you need it on your Outlook too? Pah. Other than that, these are all things I'd expect to be annoyances. Once we all give into the forced upgrade that M$ will provide us with, we'll all get used to it and, in time, like it. The problems that stick will, only afterward, be addressed. Methinks. Edited: And so it shall be done, Santee - for you.

romeovoid
romeovoid

My biggest annoyance is with Outlook 2010's inability to mimic version 2007/2003 Coversation View of messages. The old Coversation View effectively groups emails with the same subject in a collapsible group and puts the group on the top of the message pile, making it easy for me to see confirmation messages history from various companies (for example, phone bill payments) which ususally retains the same subject from month to month.

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

that I need not bother to purchase. Thank you.

jcover13a
jcover13a

Well, I think you have convinced me here not to upgrade (although I'll have to go back see what you said about the 10 cool features). My primary reason is the cost (boo!!), and a secondary reason is that I have several very useful and "well-worn" productivity plug-ins in Outlook 2007 that I can't do without. And I'm not migrating to 64-bit because too many of my other key productivity apps aren't there yet, and I don't want to give them up either.

TG2
TG2

Cyberfrog ... Did you ever use a microsoft office product before the 2007 version came out with the Ribbon Bar feature? Did you find, that your previous experince in using that office product, had to be thrown out the door, your keyboard shortcuts that you've learned changed, the placement for pictograms to click on be difficult to find, and that some commands require extra clicks of a mouse, or that you hunted around for things on these ribbon bars? Its the simple fact, that given 50 people in a room, if only one person hasn't touched a computer, hasn't operated an office product (word lets say) and the other 49 have ... when faced with using 2007 or 2010 word for the first time, not only did that one inexperienced user have to learn where things were, and how to operate the program ... the OTHER 49 people were fumbling around for features, commands, keystroke combinations that they had already learned, but that were no longer the same in the 2007 & 2010 versions of the products. As a student ... we don't start on 2 year calculus if we didn't learn how to do basic math first. We didn't jump right into trig, or even to algebra, without knowing the basic math first.. what we learned in basic math, was applied to algebra, from algebra to calculus & trig .. etc.. this is called building upon previous knowledge. Microsoft threw everyone's previous knowledge out the window, and made EVERYONE counter productive until they learned this new interface of theirs ... It was the last offense in a long line of offenses they've been putting on the people, the work force, the business. I strongly support any alternative to office because microsoft didn't care for the 95% of the people that already had learned something.. and said to them.. F You, you're going to start again.. I've no time for that with everything else in life ... so in return its F microsoft. They had the option, to give users the CHOICE of the ribbon bar, or the standard menu structure ... that would have saved microsoft this headache. But not only did they change for the ribbon bar, they changed many of the keystroke combinations further throwing out all that people had learned. Its just plain stupid. You like it that's fine.. but make sure you respect the honest opnions of your peers, make sure you make it clear to them, you want to know if they find one thing or another to be a problem, so that they are actually thinking of the product, rather than just some passing remark (ie. don't like it .. why? ... make it an indepth so they think about it)

stgcs(sw)
stgcs(sw)

Not sure where you got the idea you need to be on the Internet to use MS Office but that is just not correct. MS Word, MS PowerPoint, MS Excel, and MS Access are all application which can be used without access to the Internet. Outlook is a Personal Information Management application which will allow you to keep Contacts, Calendar, ToDo List, etc., and it also happens to be an e-mail client. Even in Outlook you can create an e-mail and send it later so you don't have to be on the Internet. Who ever told you that it is necessary to be on the Internet to use MS Office needs to do their research before they post information.

jdowski
jdowski

I work for a very large health insurance company and we are currently on Office 2007. However, Office 2010 will be available by the end of the Summer. As a Data Analyst I am looking forward to this as I Admin several large multiuser Access databases with users spread across the country in various offices as well as working from home. SharePoint 2010 with Access Services will allow me/us to move many of these apps to SharePoint where users will be able to interact with them via a browser. Don't tell me to move to SQL & .NET because as a non-IT employee those tools are not available to me. Our IT dept. doesn't support Access at all. They only want to rewrite everything into Oracle, DB2, or SQL with a .NET front end. That's great but most areas do not have the budget for that. Worst of all is then you lose control of your application. Want a new report ? Weeks....some new codes added...weeks.... Access web & hybrid databases are coming and I couldn't be happier. J.

TG2
TG2

regarding your number 5 .. an the ribbon dropping down.. its NOT just coming down ... it shifts your ENTIRE document down. Where as the previous "Menu" structure.. the menu came down and only covered the part of the screen the menu was over ... it wasn't the full width of the email window, it didn't shove the document around and waste time with redrawing the entire screen (when having multiple things open and being worked on, the visible redraw took two to three seconds before the bar was down and stable for clicking) ... and just to mention that fact.. that you have to click to show the ribbon and then select a different PART of the ribbon.. rather than getting directly to the menu you needed from the old menu system.. again.. wasteful clicks. I don't think people like you respect the amount of time other people have in this business. I don't think people like you realize that in a larger office, where 90% of the staff has used a computer, has used office products for 3, 5, and 10 years prior.. suddenly have their work grind to a halt, because they can't find their menu, they can't use the same alt and ctrl key combinations for some things.. and now they're wasting 2 3 and 4 times the energy trying to get a simple document done. And lastly.. your 15million rows.. you're doing it wrong. If you can't get the job done in 65k lines, then the work is broken into smaller chunks, put on multiple pages of a spreadsheet, or isn't done in a spreadsheet at all, but in a database application which *is* written to handle millions upon millions of lines.. Alternatively.. microsoft comes out with a product .. that allows users the CHOICE of menu systems, STANDARDIZES ALL of its keyboard short cuts, and updates their products to enhance their ability ... ie.. giving you and your office that 15 million row ability... the 15 million rows.. sure.. that's an enhancement ... the forced use of the ribbon bar in a workforce that already knew without thinking or mapping pictures to "text" based menus .. that isn't an enhancement, its a play on monoplization of the market place, and everyone that didn't fight this, is just as culpable for allowing microsoft to f**k with your time clock.

LocoLobo
LocoLobo

If somebody sends me an excel spreadsheet with a million rows I am going to request they explain or simplify. I'm not sure my workstation can handle a spreadsheet that large. When we get to a million rows we tend to think Oracle or SQL Server. We are still on 2003 and thinking about upgrading. The compatibility issue may force us to do something. We still haven't used SharePoint.

Ron_007
Ron_007

I've just read that the new Office 2011 for MAC will have the Ribbon UI too. BUT ...

REmery
REmery

It is extremely easy to add an additional MENU tab, which gives you the familiar menu layout. Nice while you are learning the Ribbon. Look at: http://www.ubit.ch/software/ubitmenu-languages/ Free for non-commercial uses. A video is shown at this site, too.

TG2
TG2

I still see no reason to upgrade from Office 2003, to anything newer, except that is, to upgrade into Open Office. If I kept anything from Office 2003, it would be Outlook, and even then once Thunder Bird improves, outlook would be gone too. For me the initial killer was the Ribbon. On a laptop, the Ribbon Bar takes up twice as much space as the "old" menu system. And any of you morons saying "hide the ribbon bar" then I reply .. what exactly is the point of the F**king ribbon bar if auto minimized, when it then becomes JUST LIKE THE F**KING MENU SYSTEM IT REPLACED?! Its Very SIMPLE for me.. I've been using Microsoft's Office products since before they were a "Suite" ... my first version of word was 2.0 and once it became a suite .. I've been using them since (alongside with WP and WP Office) And it is absolutely mind bogglingly stupid that microsoft threw away EVERYTHING that people had learned for the past 15+ years and went in a completely different direction... e.g. The file menu ... Alt+F ... show me any application before the ribbon that didn't have a FILE menu.. didn't have a HELP menu... and didn't prominently show them... New people may not have understood them, may not have figured out print was where it was, didn't realize "Insert" was the menu for Inserting things (jezus they had to actually click on the insert menu and read the items there rather than click the insert tab and get mostly pictagrams for the functions) People that didn't know the suite ... LEARNED it... BUT ... add this "ribbon" concept and change MANY KEY COMBOs... and now not only did newbies not know how to use office .. but the 90% of the work force that already KNEW their previous office menus (or at least had a vague idea of them) and now THEY TOO had to re-learn how to work in Microsofts' biggest productivity application. forcing 100% of the people to learn or re-learn how to do something is NOT productive. Even our article writer.. you've found you like the ribbon bar.. how nice for you.. but why is it that microsoft couldn't have had the ribbon bar as an option as well as the standard structure EVERYONE that had ever touched and office product before had known and seen? Because microsoft didn't care worth a sh*t... they were out to get the "visually" challenged morons that touted Apple's graphical approaches.. and all MS has done for some of us, is prove we need to find an alternative. NO reasons to use 2010 microsoft office products. Outlook? Social integration features in a MICROSOFT product will equal more surface area for attack, slower OUTLOOK performance (who didn't turn off Smart Tags when they learned it slowed down outlook?) and the holy grail of idiotic behaviors using word as the email editor ... how else can microsoft turn "/strong/ HELLO /strong/" into 25 plus lines of /DIV/ encapsulated crap! Additionally to our author.. don't change KISS just to keep your own barrometer of foul language happy.. there's a reason the last S is known as "stupid" not least of which is that it insults and makes a person angry ... and in feeling anger, a person starts to look at "the thing" more.. and in looking at "the thing" or issue more, they may eventually realize why keeping it simple is important.. Keep It Simple Stupid is VERY specific in intent ... KEEPing IT SIMPLE ... only a stupid person over thinks simplicity and makes it complex.. only microsoft would violate KISS and still come out smelling like a rose.

carlsf
carlsf

REASONS.... 1) "RIBBON" interface counter productive. 2) 64bit is NOT 64 bit ready (WHY NOT MS) Ive been 64bit for two years and you havent got it together (paid a prem too)you begin to look like ADOBE.... 3) Intergration with other appliations and other Office SUITEs, we and other companies have problms with Office 2007 file comapability, at least I would have expected MS to get their own Applicaions in sysnc BUT NOT SO.... MS is quickly becoming redundant in our office enviroment (115 users). With the changes to the Office suite and WIN7, alternatives are being investigated, I know we are only 115 users but multiply that over the world spells a major loss to the MS bottom line.

mckinnej
mckinnej

and I'm not seeing any reason to change. I've actually been using Open Office more lately and I'm starting to get used to some of the differences. For basic to medium duty use it's definitely a good alternative. I haven't gotten into any of the heavy lifting stuff yet though. If it had a real replacement for Outlook it would be an easy choice for most folks. For home users that don't really need Outlook and PowerPoint, OO is a no-brainer.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

We have production schedulers that export manufacturing and purchasing requirements from SAP into Excel. While they don't need a million rows, they need more than the 65K limit of 03.

mlewis
mlewis

This data does come from a SQL Database, and can be refreshed with the click of a button (The refresh takes a couple of minutes). Excel PowerPivot takes the data and rolls it into a highly compressed data cube. The workbook (including data) is only 17 MB. The cube model is also what makes it so fast. Sorting, filtering, redesigning pivot tables/charts only takes 1-2 seconds.

carlsf
carlsf

Load or Purchase an addon to do and have what has been there for years. SORRY MS we (115) and others in the REAL WORLD will be looking for and changing to a application that give us what we want/require, and NOT Attempt to force us onto a suite that has become counter productive. If I have to learn an NEW application - O/S then it wont be MS Office 2007/10 or WIN7, Microsofts LOSS and if they continue in this way the will soon start loosing their bottom line. Currentlu looking at ZOHO and GOOGLE on a Linux O/S

NexS
NexS

An ' " '.

NexS
NexS

Fix your post first.

santeewelding
santeewelding

Running away at this very second, hands over my head, protected from missiles.

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