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Revealed: The jobs that will be wiped out by cloud computing

As businesses switch to cloud computing demand for some traditional IT roles will plummet - but new, different jobs will be created instead.

Tech industry experts are predicting that demand for certain tech roles will dramatically decline over the next decade as organisations switch to cloud computing.

By 2020 the majority of organisations will rely on the cloud for more than half of their IT services, according to Gartner's 2011 CIO Agenda Survey.

After organisations have switched to the cloud the number of staff needed to manage and provision individual pieces of IT infrastructure - the likes of networks, storage and servers - can be scaled back, as much of the virtualised infrastructure that cloud is built upon can be automated.

The upshot will be whereas 70 per cent of IT resources are devoted to operating IT infrastructure today, by 2020 just 35 per cent of resources will be used in operations, according to the Gartner report New Skills for the New IT.

Bye, bye server admins?

John Rivard,  Gartner research director said that, while there will still be roles for people who want to specialise in particular infrastructure, in general IT professionals are going to need a grasp of corporate demands "or the business will bypass them".

"The cloud is an ability to commoditise the non-differentiating aspects of IT, and increasingly IT's role in differentiating the business is bigger and bigger," he said.

"The kinds of roles are definitely going to change: you're going to see much more automation, more cloud capabilities and less hands-on administration. Across the board, every organisation that I talk to is asking 'How can I use less of the resources that I have on the run, and more of it on driving the business?'."

There will be a move away from the IT specialist said Rivard, the kind of person who knows Wintel servers inside out and sleeps with technical manual, towards what he calls "versatilists", who are skilled in multiple areas of IT and business and who readily "absorbs" new information.

As the Gartner report puts it, "the skill profiles for the new IT will, in many cases, be a hybrid of business and IT skills".

In this new world, the report said, business designers and technology innovators will devise IT to support new ways of doing business, information architects and process designers will design and implement collaborative business processes that will allow for increased process automation, while solution integrators, service brokers and demand managers will manage a diverse group of cloud and non-cloud vendors.

New types of tech job

The shift towards cloud-based IT services and how it will change tech roles was a hot topic at the recent EMC World conference in Las Vegas. Howard Elias, COO for information infrastructure and cloud services at storage giant EMC, said: "There are not going to be fewer people involved in IT, but they will be involved in IT in different ways.

"If you are a server, storage or network admin, there may be fewer of those dedicated - what I call siloed component - skillsets needed."

While these roles disappear, new jobs will spring up in their place both technical - focused on marshalling different services and technologies, and business orientated - analysing huge data stores for valuable insights and matching technologies to the needs of business and customers.

"We are going to need a lot more of what I would call data centre architects or cloud architects, where you still need to know enough about servers, network and storage, but you also need to know how they integrate and interact together, and most importantly understand the management and automation that occurs on top of that to deliver that IT as a service," he said.

EMC is backing training and certification schemes for two roles it believes will be core to the future of business IT; cloud architect and data scientist. Cloud architects will deliver virtualisation and cloud designs to suit business needs, while data scientists will apply advanced analytics techniques to petabyte scale databases to identify beneficial business trends.

IT professionals looking to transition into one of these new, more business-orientated roles will also face competition not just from other techies, but from business analysts and graduates who've trained to fill these positions.

Gartner's Rivard said that business-minded techies and technology-literate business types will be equally eligible for these new posts: "They can come from either side, but they've got to be individuals who want to continue lifelong learning and master all of it."

And now for some good news...

But despite the competition for these new roles Rivard doesn't expect IT professionals will struggle to find work.

"You've got the baby boomer retirement that's going to take a significant part of legacy staff off the map. Also I don't think we're producing enough graduates on the technology or the business side, so I expect there is going to be a competition for the talent."

EMC's Elias said that IT professionals should see the change as an opportunity to broaden their professional opportunities.

"This is the challenge of creative disruption," he said.

"As that happens there is more opportunity for everybody, some people are going to say 'I don't like that new opportunity' and that is going to be a challenge for them, and there are those who want to embrace it, and believe me there are going to be more interesting jobs than there were in the past.

"You've got to take control of your career, it's more about the individual, and the individual's got to take the initiative."

The challenge ahead

IT infrastructure managers are aware of the challenge of shifting the skillset of their workforce higher up the business value chain - service management and business partnership skills was the most commonly identified area in need of improvement in a recent Gartner poll of infrastructure managers.

"They clearly see that, within IT, those are the skills that are needed, and those are the ones that are going to be hardest to get," said Rivard.

IT is in a constant state of flux with technologies coming and going every year, said Rivard, and so expects IT professionals to be able to handle the coming change.

"IT people are in this field because it changes; if they weren't they'd be pouring concrete," said Rivard.

"They generally like the technology changes, but these technology changes are driving them beyond just technology skills to become overall business leaders."

About

Nick Heath is chief reporter for TechRepublic UK. He writes about the technology that IT-decision makers need to know about, and the latest happenings in the European tech scene.

129 comments
complianzworld
complianzworld

Haha it made me laugh! in fact, nothing above mentioned  is going to be obsolete as long as you use computer as a device, in other words, cloud computing is giving job to those who understand IT applications better!  www.complianzworld.com

Bonnie Wolfe
Bonnie Wolfe

Startups are being setup on Linux flavors like Ubuntu which is not stable. Those companies get acquired by larger companies that are betting on the ability of what they acquired to scale. So bring in the Admins to keep the acquisition running while the whole thing needs to be moved to a more stable system like RedHat. And for those that claim the servers are going to be outsourced to India, I have two words "power outages."

mounandi
mounandi

I would rather say that IT jobs , the same job , will move from one company(place, country) to another. A financial company or a law firm or a coffee shop or a retail shop in US will not have any in house IT department but somebody needs to take care of the servers somewhere on earth( or even on Mars, who knows!).

dknorrisjr
dknorrisjr

Don't Worry Guys.. The Sky is not Falling!

Seotop
Seotop

+100500! "Moving content to the cloud doesn't mean that server admins are going away, you're just eliminating your physical foot print, that doesn't mean that the datacenter that's hosting your cloud isn't using physical hardware to get your cloud up and running." Absolutely agree with you, Keith!

and1_drc
and1_drc

*Organization. Other than that, its just a matter of your opinion. *Happily employed*

JonathanPDX
JonathanPDX

"IT professionals are going to need a grasp of corporate demands" - They should already be doing that. IT techs who bury their heads in the sand and fail to keep up with the businesses they support will find themselves shut out. It's more likely that IT will actually become a working partner in the business instead of being seen as a necessary evil. However, this push toward putting everything in the cloud seems like companies are just asking for trouble. After all, the very concept of a cloud is essentially nothing but vapor, and in spite of appearances of solidity and strength, I've yet to see anyone actually dance on one aside from in their imagination. But that's just my opinion.

RMSx32767
RMSx32767

ROFLOL. The jobs will simply be moved to the cloud. All (y)our jobs will become those of the "Cloud Minders".

sajeevvarghese
sajeevvarghese

The "CLOUD" has been around for a long time. Its only recently that they started marketing it as a "NEW TECHNOLOGY" to buy in non technical folks up the corporate ladder who make the buying decisions? If you are a small business, yea , it makes sense to put some of your stuff on the internet for storage instead of spending millions for internal storage or "CLOUD" ( laughing) as you call it. Why dont you give honest reviews instead of biased / uneducated reviews?

Great Gray
Great Gray

The cloud is bad if you don't have local access to your data as a prolonged internet shut-down would put your company out of business.

Sarnath
Sarnath

That was a good one.... The "Internet as a long cable..." thing.. You make a good writer.

bobwinners
bobwinners

Garbonzo beans. Is GM going to the cloud? How about IBM or Cisco or the City of New Orleans, or the State of Georgia. The idea of "THE CLOUD" is a marketing device, nothing more. It might, and I say maybe, become a storage place for individuals who want to make their data freely available, but it will never work for corporate America. It is way to risky. Could the cloud be considered a substantial backup medium for all of the above? I doubt it. Perhaps for their underlings.

tj7987
tj7987

So who owns the data in the "cloud"? I know this isnt an apples to apples comparison BUT look at megaupload.com who actually owned the data since megaupload contracted out the starage and servers from a third party. So what happens to the corporate database that moves to the cloud and then the FBI shuts down the cloud supplier? Also why are we calling it the "cloud" its not a cloud all it is, is a set of servers, switches, SANs so why isn't it called the "farm"? Also since I have all the before mentioned equipment in my server rooms. So do I have clouds ? or farms? I say we should call them SANdwiches since these items are to us IT Elite our bread and butter. So SANdwiches are what I will call my babies.

The_Real_BSAFH
The_Real_BSAFH

I agree with reisen55. While upper management would like to scale back the IT work force and hardware they have to shell out money for, and then pat themselves on the back for the cost savings (and then have to hide the true cost of the outsourcing in creative accounting). The data will be in someone else control and make it easier for crackers to access it, because once a chink in the armor is found it will work all throughout that clouds data center because it will all be standardized. User bitch enough now about how slow their data gets to them on a 100 Mbps connection with a 1 Gbps backbone to the servers. I can't wait to hear the wailing and gnashing of teeth when it loads even slower as the company decided to cheap out on the WAN connection. The cloud is just a clever marketing ploy.

nb1906
nb1906

Cloud computing is not new! The job wipe out will continue until a senior manager realises he has lost control of his data. It will only take one cloud centre to go up in smoke and then there will be wholesale panic to bring the data in house. You have no control over you data in the cloud, where it is stored, who it is sold to. Which company takes over your cloud provider. Not a very secure product. Stored in India, China, Russia, Pakistan, Iran etc etc cheap sites??

abear4562
abear4562

I bet the reporter only interviewed one guy, and that was an MBA who thought he was indispensible to the company, and who really doesnt understand what his IT department does. OTOH, the MBA was obviously very good at meaningless quotes and justifying his own job to the detriment of others.

mowder
mowder

Can you tell us who is going to maintain and upgrade the systems that businesses use to get *to* the cloud? Oh, yeah, "sys admins." If there is still hardware on the ground, and their are still confused users connecting to the cloud, and there is still *any* chance that the cloud might fail for any reason, IT workers on site will not be disappearing anytime soon. Right now, it seems economically sensible to store data in "the cloud," which should actually read "on servers in India." But then your data is even *less* controllable. India seems politically stable right now, but what happens when it's not? What happens when its own economics and politics make cloud storage unaffordable? When anyone hands all their data to a large, anonymous workforce in a country far, far away, they are putting themselves in a vastly weakened position, and are subject to all manner of extortion.

Systems Guy
Systems Guy

Why any company would move one of their most valuable assets - customer data off site, is unbelievable!

garylavery
garylavery

The constant changes from OS to OS, utter contempt for prior knowledge & experience - just rip and replace, unbearably complex server systems that are simply too expensive for SMBs to maintain. Someone (or some people) in Microsoft keep pushing nonsense to keep their jobs. Unfortunately, the clueless executives keep responding "we're all in regarding (pick your technology du jour)". Too bad. We really do depend on MS. They are going the wrong way. It will be bad for all of us.

orionluv
orionluv

My medical information hosted in INDIA??? I want that info on physical servers housed in my hospital. Internet goes down, there goes all my patient information, as I'm lying in the ED with symptoms that need quick diagnose with the help of my medical history that now is not available. (Can you tell I work in a hospital?) I believe no matter how much we move to cloud computing, there will still be areas where locally housed server farms are preferential to cloud based operations. We have a company who outsources reading our images (X-Rays, Ultrasounds, etc) after hours, and it is a huge issue if there is a problem with the Internet anywhere between our facility and that company. Luckily at those times, our radiologists actually have to come in and do the reading themselves. I cannot foresee such data so closely related to speedy patient care being "outsourced" to the cloud anytime soon, nor would I want it to be.

ITonStandby
ITonStandby

Perhaps the trends mentioned in this piece are true in the very large corporation, but I can't see it applying to the rest of us. I work in the trenches with small businesses and the majority - the vast majority of business owners do not know and do not WANT to know about cloud computing. The cost savings are just not there for them. They keep their data local on servers they control. Cloud backup? Sure, some do. Cloud computing? Nope. Having said that, I've also worked in I.T. for the federal government in the recent past and they are always last to adopt new tech, so plenty of work for sys admins there for the foreseeable future. In my experience, the fed govt is at least 5 years behind the corporate world in I.T. innovations. Only when there is a justifiable reason driving it does technology change occur there. The fed is not driven by profit. They don't need to jump ahead of the competition to stay afloat. Also, it's a hard sell to convince upper management in a big company that placing critical data in the hands of a third party cloud provider is secure. However, it's a relatively easy sell to convince them to create a private cloud they own and control. So, if you want to make a case for cloud growth in the large corporate environment, there it is. You might get some collocation to a third party provider just for DR/COOP. Lastly, cloud computing when it first started was something entirely different that what it is today. It's essentially become a fad full of confusion and misinformation. From that, distrust is soon to follow. My 2 cents.

cybershooters
cybershooters

Is that I've become a liason. Instead of fixing it myself, I have to get hold of someone to fix it for me, but I'm still needed because I understand it from a technical viewpoint. So in fact it's slower than it was before. I'm not getting too concerned about it because the marketing hype is starting to evaporate as reality sets in. People are loath to put sensitive data in the cloud, and another big problem is internet availability. In Japan, Singapore and big cities in North America, this isn't such an issue but it sure is in Europe. If you haven't got a decent internet connection then cloud-based computing isn't practical. You can't put certain things like DCs into the cloud (well maybe you can but you're an idiot if you do), so there will always be servers on-site. There will always be tech people, server admins often work from home now anyway, the only real difference will be who they work for and where the servers are located. I've already seen this in action, too much emphasis by VMWare and Microsoft on virtualization and cloud, but at the end of the day, someone has to still set up those images and make sure they're working. How you deploy them and access them is a tertiary point, imv. That's not where the work is. The price point on things like Office 365 is not good either, this is something else people are picking up on, it's really expensive and because it's a subscription-based licensing model, it means you can't defer purchases and businesses do not like to be tied to paying big bills routinely, especially at the moment. There is a fear for example that Microsoft could raise their prices, whereas if you buy it all up front you know what the total cost is. This idea it's all going to India is laughable, they don't have a sufficient base of technical expertise, despite claims to the contrary and there are big issues with network latency, which is why data centers are being put in Colorado. You can't make the speed of light go faster.

tech
tech

you will see a shrinking role for a Server Admin in Corporate America. I manage about 15 servers, but if I were working for a cloud provider I would probably manage on the order of 1000 (That is what google is shooting for). However, I have been hearing about the doom and gloom of the tech industry for at least 10 years, forgive me if I don't get too excited about it just yet. I have seen this all before. We started with Mainframes and selling processor time and storage space. Moved to everyone buying equipment, and now we are moving back to the centralized storage and buying the time/space we need. While that certainly works for some business models and some types of data there are downsides. One of the biggest in my opinion is the lack of control, and the increased exposure to data theft. HIPPA and other regulations can definitely stand in the way of "The Cloud". Some of these "Cloud Providers" even go so far to tell you that they will mine through your data, and a couple even go so far as to say the data is not yours, they own it. Yeah, I know that is what I want to do with the most valuable resource my company has, pay someone to rifle through it and, potentially at least, reduce it's value. Law firms, hospitals, financial firms, DOD contractors are some examples that aren't likely to move to 'The Cloud' there simply isn't enough security there. We have already seen what happens when "The Cloud" has problems. Amazon had issues a while back, Microsoft has had major issues too in the past. When companies don't have access to their data and applications for a couple of days they will rethink the strategy of putting everything in the cloud. For a small company it may appear to make sense, but then there is that recurring cost to keep your information in "The Cloud". Those recurring costs can really kill a small business. They often have some capital and or a loan to get a business started, but when they hit a slump, can't make a payment, and the 5 years worth of data they had in The Cloud "Disappears" they will certainly need to rethink that strategy. The Cloud has one MAJOR flaw. In order to use it you MUST cede control to a third party. I just don't see most of corporate America being willing to hand over their most valuable resource to a third party who will be able to go through it, may sell it, and will delete it if they miss a payment or two. Wait until the DOJ requests a companies information and the "Cloud Provider" says, "oh, ok here you go". I know some use encryption, but how much faith do you put in someone else encrypting, storing and securing your information? Then you have CISPA and all the other cyber laws coming down the pike that means I no longer have control over my data. With a flip of the switch I lose my data (or it is copied) and handed over to the NSA. No thank you, for me and my clients, we will be keeping their most valuable resources secured locally and not "In the Cloud". That doesn't mean we won't allow secure access from the net, but I will not recommend handing data over to a third party anytime in the near future. Much like SaaS it is little more than a gimmick designed to make steady income for others and a steady drain on your wallet.

vonmoltke
vonmoltke

more of an OP-ED piece, than anything... Did the author hack cell phones in our 51st state (England) ?

Goob
Goob

I will never take my business to the cloud. I will never buy software that is cloud based. They will have to pry my cold, dead fingers from the rack.

rusty66dba
rusty66dba

I have been in IT for 22 years. When I first started, all I heard was that the MainFrame is going away. Well, here I am 22 years later and M/F is still chugging along and thriving. There may be the addition of more wide jobs vs deep, but there will always be a need for the specialist who can troubleshoot major issues, especially in environments expecting 99.999% uptime. Just my 2 cents!

brian_tuley
brian_tuley

The assumption here is that the ENTIRE infrastructure moves to the cloud... no more domain controller, local storage, nothing... Clearly that's wrong. Security is managed locally WITH active directory AND domain controllers. Some ancillary processes / server may move to the cloud, but not the entire infrastructure... Maybe when everyone has 1000Gig connections to the internet and ISP's have the backbone for millions on businesses with 1000Gig connectivity, but till then- you're just a prognosticator who fails to see details or logistics

pgallagher
pgallagher

didn't gartner about 4-5 years ago say that in 2012 secretaries would be doing the work of IT because they will all be tech literate or something along those lines.....it was a running joke here everytime there was a network or OS crisis we'd say go get the secretary....yeah that'll get it fixed real fast....... also there was no say about the network or cloud storage admin....if the cloud grows they will need sys admins there instead of in the company......nothing was stated about the amount of jobs that would open up from the cloud - job specifically like network, sys admin etc.....so not so fast lets see what pans out

Darren B - KC
Darren B - KC

Where it says ???If you are a server, storage or network admin, there may be fewer of those...", I don't get it. Sooo, the cloud doesn't use servers, storage, or networks??? Why do I constantly get the feeling that we're being spoon fed this mythical idea that "the cloud" is some magical place where data just "exists" without humans ever touching it?!??! Seriously, who on top of the IT ladder is sucking on the crack pipe?

mrevivo
mrevivo

I remember application service providers (ASP) and zero administration by Microsoft etc. Over the years, I keep seeing different attempts by the giants in the IT industry to gain control of IT operations in the world, including data, but what no one seem to address, is Intelectual Property (IP) this is a HUGE issue that needs to be addressed before any data can be even considered on the cloud. I know of many companies that are responsible for protecting very sensitive and personal data, i.e. the health and financial industries, do you think they will store the data on the cloud which in turn end up in india, china or even outside the border of wherever they are??? think again!!! the privacy laws are different in each country and these companies have leagal obligation to protect the data, and must be the owner of the data at all times, how will they fix that? not in a million years. Also, what about a single point of Failure? the internet goes down and the business is down. Will banks be on the cloud? do you want your financials to be in india for example? think again. I do know, that in canada, all the ISPs are fighting to "put the meter on" which means, start charging by the bit, can you imagin if all your data in on the cloud? what will your internet bill look like? Just some thing to think about>

darren_1065
darren_1065

The Cloud has some unique aspects but I think a lot of this is just hype. There is no perfect OS, no perfect Programming Language, no perfect network or storage device, and no perfect cloud - perfect in a way that fits every situation. The Cloud is another tool, that's it. Right now it's the big buzz that keeps the "managerial" side of technology relevant. Two years from now we'll still have a cloud, more mature, and comfortable in it's place alongside the rest of our tools. And we'll have the next big craze, some other buzz word that will drive, not necessarily innovation, but more sales for big providers.

NunyaBZ
NunyaBZ

I'm tired of reading this. I swear these articles are written to give CIOs and other pointy hairs reasons to outsource and get rid of all jobs. The "cloud" is such an idiotic buzzword it has started making me physically ill when I hear someone say it. As my department has moved towards virtualization, all thats happened for us is a more difficult and more frustrating work load - all the while with our CIO reducing our staff numbers because "it's all in the cloud now, you don't need these people". Yah, don't need them as I've watched my workload increase 20% in the last year. Ugh.

jhorton
jhorton

As has been pointed out rather well in other posts, this is yet another in a very long line of predictions for the industry based almost entirely on buzzwords. While I agree that new skills are going to be required and that the demand for such will be extremely high, the good old skills never really go away. The 'cloud' still needs sysadmins (after all, what the hell good is a virtualized infrastructure unless you can actually use it?) and, more importantly, sysadmins on both sides of the cloud. Whenever I read an article like this, I do not smell the winds of change; rather, it is the stench of dead material, often rehashed with the latest buzzwords inserted. In short, doom and gloom is not around the corner (something the author says as well) but instead new opportunities for us to do what we do best - learn, adapt, and incorporate.

Organic53
Organic53

Wow, glad to hear that TechRepublic has gotten rid of SysAdmins. I guess cloud machines just run by themselves with no help. What a moron this Elias character is, but then he is trying to sell his services

klashbrook
klashbrook

All it will take is one huge cloud outage (aka cloutage) to make everyone jump back off the cloud bandwagon and bring it all back on-premise. Imagine the upcoming day when a widespread internet outage knocks all those municipalities and hospitals off their googleapps or office365 for a couple of days. The cloud is nowhere to store mission-critical applications or services needed to run your business. Imagine most major corporations or agencies not having email for three days. Total chaos.

ljgibson
ljgibson

Same as before. Trying explaining to the CEO why your call centre cannot access the accounts of customers because the ISP is down. Guess what action they will take to change that! Yes they will get their data back from the cloud and run a local server. What is likely to happen is transforming the local servers to cloud compatible devices and automatically making the backups to the foreign cloud servers (in India or other countries) using very very stong encryption to cover off site data protection regimes.

coffeeshop
coffeeshop

While it's true that the "Cloud" exists, people are starting to overlook the fact that all the data is still stored in a physical location or locations. The convenience of the cloud comes at the cost of, among other things, security and accountability. If I put something "on/in the cloud", I don't necessarily know where it's being stored, how secure that equipment is, or who to call when there's an issue concerning that data. Furthermore, I don't want someone else storing data on my servers without several control measures in place. Now, as far as the importance of multiple skill sets, I'd say that's accurate, especially now that many companies are having to do more with less, and the jack-of-all-trades is going to be a viable competitor for future jobs.

trsolo
trsolo

I've been in IT for a very long time, my take on cloud services is they are great until they are down, or a router in between you and the cloud goes out and you face an interuption, which typically happens right when it's critical. There will still be plenty of smart businesses who want in-house storage/servers et. al. Nice article but take it for what it is, an opinion...

s.leathwood
s.leathwood

While the 70/35 change may occur in smaller organizations, infrastructure will still need to be managed in larger private cloud architectures. And even for small business "The Cloud" only moves that infrastructure elsewhere. Someone has to manage it. This is the same flawed logic as the other modern cliche "Post PC Era". Again resources are just being shifted elsewhere, and lets not forget the programmers that will design and create the apps for the non PC devices will need to do so on PCs of some type.

wismerda01
wismerda01

the server, storage and network specialists? Ruling out offshore cloud providers seems like the jobs would just migrate.

Alphonse
Alphonse

hmmm, come to think of it another technology more IT Experts needed some how. and remember it will come along with its worries as well. I guess we should be thinking on how to make the internet better,secure and more interactive. Then most companies will go all online needing just a web master/developer. EASY GOOOOOOOOO. WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

doing stupid things because they think it is falling.

The_Real_BSAFH
The_Real_BSAFH

You leave the word bitch in but take out the word c.h.i.n.k when used in a correct phrase? Dear sweet Jesus, please come get me as I can't take these politically correct morons anymore...

tech
tech

But a local hospital just experienced a 4 day outage, and there info was local, not on the 'cloud'. While I am not involved in any way, what I have heard is that they suffered a virus infection of some sort. But it didn't affect just the hospital, also the lab and most of the local doctors offices. Just sayin. without good management and policy in place, your data is at risk no matter where it is stored.

cybershooters
cybershooters

It should be called "subscriptions" rather than "cloud", it's just a way of Microsoft, etc. making more money.

gechurch
gechurch

The article doesn't explicitly state it, but I thought it was obvious that while yes, there will need to be sysadmins working for cloud providers, that doesn't mean that the overall number of sysadmins will remain the same. There are economies of scale by moving to the cloud. And when you are hosting as many servers as cloud providers do it becomes worthwhile to write software to automate a lot of things (like failover, duplication, monitoring and recovery etc). This means that the number of servers a single sysadmin can look after in the cloud should be far higher than the number an equivalent sysadmin in a private company can. Please give more thought to articles before you start calling people morons. This isn't Slashdot.

dl_wraith
dl_wraith

I think the autofilter took the ch- out but not the beeyatch. Let's try it here to see: Ch - Chink chink chink chink Bi - Bitch? EDIT: What the hell, TR? methinks your profanity filter needs reviewing. :)

dl_wraith
dl_wraith

I tawt I taw a pooty dat! I diiiid! I diiid see a pooty dat!! Funny that the filter didn't get your chinks. Chinked, chinking, chinked, chink. Pussycat, pussy-cat, pussy cat. EDIT: ha! Thought so. And so the profanity filter gives up it's weaknesses :)

andrew232006
andrew232006

My neighbors dog had puppies last week. I warned him to get that bitch spaded. But he never listens. He's the anonying type who always walks around with a pocket full of change. You can hear the chinks from his pocket a mile away. The constant chinking is very distracting. That's why I don't carry change. My pockets have never chinked. But he only thinks of himself. He actually bought a donkey and put it in his backyard. Now I have to listen to that ass every morning. And it's started to dig a hole under my fence. Don't even get me started on his cat.