Browser

Five tips for faster Web browsing

If you're wasting too much time waiting (and waiting and waiting) for Web pages to load, give these tips a try. You should see an immediate, noticeable boost in speed, making your browsing experience faster and more efficient.

Everyone wants faster Web browsing. After all, who has time to wait for Web pages to load these days? This is especially true if you're a tab-junkie like me. When you live with an open browser containing 10 to 15 tabs running at any given time, you know how crucial it is to have as fast a browsing experience as possible. But how do you manage this? Are there tricks to getting more speed when your pipe is maxed out already? You bet your sweet bits and bytes there are.

Not every solution will work for every user, and not every solution should even be attempted by every user. However, if you like to eke out as much blood as you can from every turnip, let's see how you can squeeze a bit more speed from your browsing experience.

Note: This article is also available as a PDF download.

1: Use a fast browser

Not all browsers are created equal. Some are simply faster than others. The top speed you will find, in the current crop of browsers, belongs to Google Chrome. If you've grown accustomed to Internet Explorer or Firefox, you'll notice a dramatic increase in rendering time using Google Chrome. Of all the ways you can speed up your browsing experience, this is by far the best. Google Chrome also helps speed things up by allowing you to enter search strings in the URL address bar. With this feature, you don't have to add yet another toolbar, thereby slowing down the browser even further.

2: Disable Flash

Flash pretty much saturates Web sites now. It's almost impossible to get away from this technology. Problem is, Flash can be slow, so it directly affects the speed of your browsing experience. You can have Flash turned off by default and then re-enable it to view what you need to view. The biggest problem with this is that some browsers require an add-on to block Flash. For Chrome, you need the extension Flashblock. There's also a Flashblock extension for Firefox. Internet Explorer has a built-in tool you can access by clicking Tools | Manage Add-ons. In the Manage Add-ons dialog box, double-click Shockwave Flash Object. Then, click the Remove All Sites button. This will disable Flash for all sites.

3: Save your temporary Web files on a RAM disk

I wrote an article awhile back on using a RAM disk to help speed up disk-intensive applications. Since the RAM disk will be much faster than your standard hard drive, using it to save all your browsers temporary files will create a faster environment for your browser. However, this solution is not for the newbie, and you will need to use a third-party to better achieve this task.

4: Get rid of all those toolbars

You've seen them in the wild: browsers so filled with toolbars they take up the majority of real estate in the browser window. Most users don't realize those toolbars tend to slow down the browser in many ways. Some toolbars simply take up precious computer memory, while others eat away at bandwidth by sending and receiving data in the background. The math here is quite simple: The more toolbars you have, the slower your browser will run. Some of those toolbars might seem essential. But if speed is really your top priority, you will want to jettison that extra baggage for the speed you will gain.

5: Use tabs, not windows

Too many tabs can cause problems, but they're still your best bet for browsing efficiency. How do tabs speed up your experience? A couple of ways. The first is all about organization. With multiple tabs in a single window, it becomes quite a bit faster to locate the page you need to work on. You don't have to maximize a window, discover that it's not the right one, minimize it, maximize a new window... until you find the correct one. A single window open with multiple tabs is far easier to search. This is not the only way tabs can help you. Browsers like Chrome treat each tab as an individual process (instead of a child process of a parent). So when a Web site causes a tab to crash, you can close that one tab and not lose all the other tabs. This behavior is not a standard at the moment, so you'll need to switch over to the Chrome browser to take advantage of it.

Other tips?

There are hundreds of ways to make your browsing experience faster. But the above list should give you an immediate, noticeable boost in speed. Have you found other ways to speed up your browsing experience? Share your favorite tricks with your fellow TechRepublic readers.

About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

86 comments
Rodgman
Rodgman

Unfortunately, many web sites still rely on Flash. I know because I continually run into them on my iPad. Disabling Flash is generally not a realistic option.

preferred user
preferred user

Chrome settings/content/advanced settings/scroll down check " click to play" Flash and other plug in auto run problems solved . maybe the author should try that a simple elegant solution. no extensions needed to accomplish this. That way when you have a tab open it's not automatically playing a video you did not want to see or hear anyway you have to give it permission .

aandruli
aandruli

Any other browser on a T1 line will beat Chrome on a cable connection. The browser you use has such a slight difference in speed that no one, these days, would notice.

skylight
skylight

Wonder why ZD.net 's email would include it in today's "Downloads Digest"?? Slow day perhaps!!!

skylight
skylight

In my experience both on my home network and at work I find IE and Firefox are both slower, the former substantially slower in fact. At work I needed the HelpDesk to help out with some technical software I use in my work. The Tech Support guy started to use IE 9 because he needed to download a patch. He clicked IE 9 and while waiting for it to load he said it would have been better to have Chrome. I told him it was already there. He immediately shut IE 9 and started Chrome which loaded virtually immediately. I am not a big fan of Google for a few reasons but I have to call a spade a spade. Where Firefox is concerned I have in fact uninstalled it both at work and home because it was creating too many problems and I didn't have the patience to figure everything out. But when I was using it, while it was quicker than IE9 but certainly not faster than Chrome. Maybe browser speed depends on the ISP but even on my laptop it is exactly the same. So I am in complete agreement with the article.

essex133
essex133

I was forced to try a different browser when I could not sign in to eBay using IE9. And yes, I did try resetting IE to see if that would cure the problem but it didn't. So I installed and tried Chrome and Firefox. But there were things I did not like about both of them: When printing pages using Chrome, images would often be missing from the preview - but I could successfully print to my Epson printer or to Microsoft's XPS printer. And Norton Identity Safe worked with Chrome. But in order for Chrome to work properly, I found it necessary to go into settings and delete my browsing history each time I started Chrome, which I found a drag. I have IE set to delete my browsing history each time I close my browser. I also run CCleaner on a regular basis to clear up what's left behind. But I could ONLY print to Microsoft's XPS printer in Firefox if I did NOT select print preview from the File menu first! If I did select print preview from the file menu, the 'save as' dialogue box would freeze every single time. Also Norton Identity Safe is NOT compatible with Firefox, which meant I had to install LastPass as an add-on. But fortunately, the next time I tried resetting IE, I found that I could then sign in to eBay again with it! Now I can once again do print previews and print to any printer I like; I can use Norton ID Safe; and I can have my browsing history deleted every time I close my browser. Result: I'm a very happy bunny!

uthamaputiran
uthamaputiran

You can follow the Tips Below to Fast browsing 1.Install Firefox or Google Chrome Latest Browser version . 2.Clear the Cookies when before and after starting browsing. 3.use the Torrent for download any thing,it would be faster 4.Install internet security to protect your system... 5.Avoid visiting malware sites to know those site install site adviser You can check your internet speed at here http://www.ip-details.com/internet-speed-test/

ScarF
ScarF

I didn't know that you use Jack's signature, but I realised that you must be behind this article since you recommend to turn off the Flash (#2) in the midst of the war between Flash-disabled (aka "iPad") and Flash-enabled (aka "all-of-them-but-iPad") tablets. Anyway, besides the wistles and bells put together - sometimes with too much careless for the client's resources - Flash is used for many other usefull things in a website (e.g. presentations, demos, interactive training, calculators, and - of course - games).

RB1955
RB1955

Most computers I run across have the Browser's Temp files set far too high. To adjust: [example here is for IE8] with browser open, Tools / Internet Options / Browsing History Settings. Set "Disk Space To Use" to somewhere in the 50 Mb - 250 Mb range. Click "Apply". Having a RamDisk also helps, but if the ramdisk is not big enough doesn't help. Make sure RamDisk settings are at least as large as the "Disk Space To Use" file. Set the RamDisk to E:\Temporary Internet Files\ .... this should keep the RamDisk as a temp file that deletes itself when pc/tablet/etc is shut off.

mattohare
mattohare

For me, it's a big mess. I've actually started using Firefox for my research because the search and addressing are separate. That or going explicitly to the website where I want to do the search (Google, Bing, Yahoo or Wikipedia). The author says it's because we can do away with another toolbar. I dumped the only extra toolbar (Google) years ago. That was just after disabling search from my address bar. When the search box appeared next to the address box (and I noticed I could get there with Ctrl+E), my experience got a lot faster. Now, I just need to learn the keystroke to get me into the box. Ctrl+E doesn't seem to do it in FF.

juansdamian
juansdamian

Mr. Scott Lander.. It works for me... suck it!

JCitizen
JCitizen

Adaware plus CCleaner. Guess what? They all got so fast I can't tell the difference!! Get rid of the pesky flash ads, cookies, and the temp-files that queue from them, and you will notice a HUGE difference in not only speed, but whether the page loads at all!!

JimB62
JimB62

I also notice no difference between Chrome and Firefox, Explorer, on the other hand, has been so painfully slow in my experience that I have long ago relegated it to a back up browser in fact, I don't even remember the last time that I used it for anything more than downloading some things from the Microsoft website. Firefox can slow down if you have it loaded down with extensions and toolbars.

eanderson
eanderson

Seriously, while older computers can render static sites and server-generated HTML content with little effort they have a tougher time handling those that make heavy use of JavaScript and/or involve a lot of interaction on the client side.

drdax2301
drdax2301

also FF4 only browser with full HTML5 - and love all the extensions

Gis Bun
Gis Bun

... That Jack suggests Chome. It may be fast [according to him] but buggy as hell. Let alone that [in Windows] it doesn't even install in Program Files. You disable Flash and many site won't function too well. Most news organizations [let alone YouTube and others] require Flash for video content.

lymanp
lymanp

I have been using Opera since Win 3.11 and have always found it a better experience that any other I have tried. It has its quirks, and not all websites support it but I'll use 99% of the time.

awgiedawgie
awgiedawgie

You're pushing Chrome as if they're paying you. What's up with that? I'll just take each of your points in order... 1: While it is blatently obvious that not all browsers are created equal, saying that Chrome is "by far the best" is a very opinionated statement. Weary of IE, I tried Chrome when they first came out, and suddenly found myself liking IE a lot more. Chrome reorganized my favorites the way Google thought was best, with little regard for how I wanted it, and then left me no way to manage them outside of dragging each one individually from where Chrome put it, to where I had it before. When you have several hundred favorites nested several layers deep, that is a totally unacceptable alternative. They haven't given me any real incentive to switch back again. And your remark about being able to enter search strings directly into the URL bar ignores IE9, which now allows you to do the same thing. 2: I won't argue that Flash can be a real pig, but for my own experience, it winds up being more of a nuisance to have to enable it when I encounter a site that needs it. If it were just about the ads, I would be happy to leave it disabled, because I have absolutely no use for ads. 3: The RAMdisk idea actually sounds like something I will look into and try out. 4: No argument here either. I ALWAYS uncheck that irritating little checkbox when I install new software - you know the one that says "yes please install the free [Google/Ask/Yahoo/etc.] toolbar" and the one right below it that says "yes please make that my homepage". The only toolbar (if you want to call it that) that I use is my favorites bar. And personally, my homepage is a blank page. I rarely want to look at the same page every time I open my browser, so why waste time loading one when I'm just going to switch to something else anyway? And finally, 5: Tabs are a great idea, as they do improve organization. But as for your analogy, it's a little ridiculous. I don't know anyone who would minimize one window, then maximize the next, then minimize that one, and maximize the next, etc. It's so much faster to just Alt-Tab from one window to the next. Of course, with Windows 7's thumbnail preview feature on the taskbar, you can even more easily browse not only your tabs in one browser window, but all your open browser tabs/windows without even having to switch tabs. Then I see you're pushing Chrome again. They "treat each tab as an individual process..." Great. But even in IE8, if a tab crashed, it would quite often restart itself without affecting the other tabs. I never actually tried to kill an individual IE8 tab using Process Explorer, but it is possible to do so in IE9. IE9 also allows you to drag an individual tab out of the window to create a separate window, or into another window to make it an additional tab in that window, so Chrome no longer has that advantage over IE either. I'm not foolish enough to say that IE9 is "by far the best," but it is what I use. Every browser has its own set of pros and cons, and depending on your browsing habits and needs, the balance of pros vs. cons will be different for each person. For my needs, the pros vs. cons balance has never been good enough in any other browser to outweigh the irritation of migrating from one to the other.

Jaqui
Jaqui

compared to a REAL browser lynx. no flash no javascript no tables or frames no pictures nothing to slow it down. and no addon toolbars either. worlds fastest browser, with least security flaws.

bzar
bzar

Am I the only one experiencing this? Also, pages actually take much longer to render than Firefox. Definitely not a faster option!

pmishler
pmishler

You state "you???ll notice a dramatic increase in rendering time using Google Chrome." What you mean is "decrease in rendering time" or "increase in rendering speed."

g01d4
g01d4

My guess would be that most computers today have enough resources to handle the issues noted above. When I see a perfomance problem it could be something like the website's waiting on a URL related to one of the ads on the site, i.e. it's not something on the desktop - though I do purge my temp files once in awhile which might be a 6th tip.

Kent Lion
Kent Lion

I installed Chrome because both FireFox and IE often seemed slow and everyone was claiming Chrome was fast. After using Chrome for a couple of weeks I uninstalled it because I too noticed no appreciable difference, and some things I do were more difficult in Chrome.

pgit
pgit

-Disable IPv6 -disable pop-ups -set default to deny ALL scripts, not just flash. (java can be a killer, too) -disable third party cookies, mainly if you have a policy of "ask every time" for cookies from new domains -consider a hosts list to shunt ad web sites to the oblivion of your loopback interface. There are some huge lists of ad servers available on line for this purpose. In Linux especially I see a marked improvement in browser speed by disabling IPv6 system wide. I imagine it has to do with protocols having to time out because there's a bottleneck beyond which IPv6 isn't available. That would be your router in 99% of the situations I've come across. So IPv6 is playing "marco-polo" in the pool all by itself.

monsterke
monsterke

Firefox has been the major competitor for IE for a number of years now and is taking about 50% of the "market-share". With advices coming in to wait before installing IE9 and Version 4 saying hello, I bet the browser "rat-race" is clearly headed by FF. I cannot think of anyone using Chrome on a Mac - And on a PC people installed it just because it was an alternative to IE8 when it first came out. It seems like Jack Wallen has been promised a bottle of Google Champagne to promote Chrome like this... No surprises people - Firefox is the overall best browser

ktaisia
ktaisia

What about startup time. How long it takes for the program itself to startup. Wife uses Chrome, I use firefox. Tried them both on CNN.com as well, all Cache Cleared, What i noticed was that Chrome loaded bits and displayed them as they were loading, Firefox loaded the whole page before displaying it. So I cant judge on this one.

andyraybould
andyraybould

To be fair to the author, it was stated at the beginning "Not every solution will work for every user" Jack may well feel that his browsing experience is quicker with Chrome - you may not. I generally stay with IE but have seen useful tools and add-ins with Firefox that have helped me with particular tasks. Keep writing the articles Jack. IT is about providing answers to specific problems, not providing generic solutions and any article like yours that adds to awareness and debate is a useful tool in itself.

mullachv
mullachv

Opera is by far the fastest, Jack - that should be your first bullet

PQAlex
PQAlex

"The biggest problem with this is that some browsers require an add-on to block Flash. For Chrome, you need the extension Flashblock." This statement is completely FALSE. I design websites both Flash and non-Flash and when I make a Flash website I always have an underlying HTML page for those who choose not to view Flash. Therefore, I test my sites with Flash enabled and disabled, in Chrome, without any special extension. All you have to do to turn off flash in Chrome is go to "Options"->"Under the Hood"->"Content Settings" and then "Disable individual plug-ins", from there just find Flashplayer on the list and click "disable". Simple.

Humgut
Humgut

The statement that Chrome performance 'is by far the best' may have been true when this article was written, but not as of yesterday when Firefox 4 RC1 became the official release. Should have previewed FF4 Jack, before making that exclusive endorsement. I mainly run Fedora 14 Linux and have favoured Firefox 3.6 as my primary browser. I did however find myself cutting over to Chrome at times for more speed, particularly on JavaScript-heavy sites where FF3.6 was noticeably sluggish. Now the long overdue FF4 is my go to browser. It is blisteringly fast and meets or exceeds Chrome performance for anything I throw at it. I'm not disrespecting Chrome, just pointing out that Firefox has caught up and, for my system and uses, has the edge for now. As others have pointed out, performance is hugely dependent on operating system, hardware, and usage patterns, and browsers may shine in some situations and pig-out in others. Another speed tip: beware of all plugins/add-ons/extensions, not just flash or toolbar related ones. Some can be buggy or ill-designed and really drag performance down.

Nsaf
Nsaf

If you have to instal a plugin mutliple times (Java) and even then the browser fails to load it......cough..I mean Chrome...it is useless.

jayflex
jayflex

From my experience Opera is much faster than Chrome. Also, recommending to search from the address bar is poor advice at best. Disable Java?? What good is speed if you have so many sites that no longer function without Java? Not one of the better articles to come from Tech Republic.

blarman
blarman

Browsers - just like any other program - depend on RAM. Want faster load times? Not only should you disable toolbars, but disable some of the add-ons like the Adobe Download Manager, unneeded Java Consoles, and other hooks. Also disable startup items like printer toolboxes (HP is (in)famous for these), Updaters (Java, Adobe, etc.) and other startup items. The leaner your system runs, the less task-switching that happens and the more your computer can concentrate on the one program with focus.

blarman
blarman

Browsers - just like any other program - depend on RAM. Want faster load times? Not only should you disable toolbars, but disable some of the add-ons like the Adobe Download Manager, unneeded Java Consoles, and other hooks. Also disable startup items like printer toolboxes (HP is (in)famous for these), Updaters (Java, Adobe, etc.) and other startup items. The leaner your system runs, the less task-switching that happens and the more your computer can concentrate on the one program with focus.

Beta Breaker
Beta Breaker

My browser experience with IE and FireFox was significantly improved by switching to OpenDNS, rather than using the default AT&T supplied DNS.

ezrydr84
ezrydr84

I tried Google Chrome - nothing special there but good old Google of course had to put their Google Updater software on my computer. (like they do with ALL their crap). I have network of approx 300 computers and inevitably when I get a call from a user that their system is slow I find that they have installed Google Earth, or Chorme or Toolbar (usually from an Adobe download - thank you very much ADOBE) and Google Updater is busy hogging system resources. Add to that all the poisened serach results you get when you use Google for your search engine and I simply have nothing good to say about them. Just as point of observation in my own environment - I estimated that approx 90% of the drive-by malware problems come from using Google as a search engine. At least Yahoo tried to do some filtering and warning of potential maliscious web sites.

leo8888
leo8888

This one is never mentioned but we have been using it on all workstations in our office and it runs very well. It has a clean interface and a built in email client which is another plus. Adding the NoScript add-on also makes it very secure and gives you complete control over what actually loads when you visit a page. For the small percentage of sites that refuse to work (usually those with active-x) we just default back to I.E. but for general browsing SeaMonkey with NoScript is fast and secure. I agree 100% with the suggestion to remove toolbars. Every time I am cleaning up a pc for a client if I see lots of toolbars I suggest they be uninstalled. The clients are always pleased with how much cleaner and faster their browsers run, regardless of which one they use. Most of the time toolbars get installed along with some other software they installed and they don't even remember where they came from. Bundling un-needed crap with almost everything these days is one of my pet peeves.

ess
ess

are due to the ISP's. Most ISP's do not have their networks configured properly to the internet backbone and/or internally on their system. End of Story.... New Story... Try and find a good ISP in AMERICA. Can't......why....!!! Their run by sporting white trophies on the wall, that.....are non-inclusive of wisdom...!! End of second Story....!!! You gota love America... Home of the free & the brave & the IDIOTS...!! It's not our network system sir, it must be a problem on your computer system..!! Yea right..!! Then they say..... Sir it appears your the only one having a problem.!!! When they say that, you know right off, their lying.!! Third story...... I sent my ISP trace route data showing them they have a problem. Sir our systems are running normally right now, it must be a problem with your computer. What they failed to realize from the report I sent them, was the trace route's were to my IP and two friends on the their network system. Three different IP address on their system all showing the same issue..!! i.e. 2 gigaethernet0.baycarehs5.bbnplanet.net (63.208.3.2) 0 msec 0 msec 0 msec 3 * * * 4 72-31-194-9.net.bhntampa.com (72.31.194.9) [AS33363] 4 msec 8 msec 8 msec 5 * * * 6 tengig1-0-0-orld53-cts1.noc.bhn.net (72.31.194.33) [AS33363] 4 msec 8 msec 8 msec 7 * * * 8 * * * 9 * * * 10 * * * 11 * * * 12 * * * 13 * * * 14 * * * 15 * * * 16 * * * 17 * * * timeout ! Kinda says it all....doesn't it.!! And of course browsing is a clear indication the problem exists. They either have a lot of equipment down, or a mis-configuration..!! Take your pick.!! Been battling this for three years, in the last month it has gotten much worse, and I expect their network to go down at any time, hopefully. Then they might fix it.!! Then again, they might not.!! Their IDIOTS WITH sporting white trophies on the wall remember.!! YUP their Religiously RIGHT..!! What else is new.....

jhinkle
jhinkle

I've noticed that TR pushes a lot of Google products, especially in your daily emails for Google Apps. This article, along with other articles I've seen states that Chrome is simply the fastest without providing any kind of current bench marking. Here's a link to a current bench mark from Tom's hardware, see for yourself how page loads rank for each browser (from 03/21/2011) - Spoiler, no one browser is simply the best. http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/internet-explorer-9-chrome-10-opera-11,2897-5.html I'm wondering are you posting these articles because you get paid to by Google, or if you are genuinely trying to write a tech article with no technical details. PS: You completely skipped Opera. Despite it's obscurity Opera has been one of the best browsers around for a long time. Judging from other posts a lot of other people know that Opera has been, and continues to be, a very well designed browser.

codepoke
codepoke

The rest is somewhere between subjective, unverifiable, and trivial.

robkraft
robkraft

I'm sure there will be plenty of arguments and discussions about which browser is fastest. The best browsers are all close in speed. But what we can all agree on, I think, is which browsers to avoid. For Windows XP users, you should run Chrome 10 or Firefox 4. Both of those browsers are noticeably faster than IE8. For Windows 7 users, IE9 has speed comparable to the latest version of Chrome.

kpdriver
kpdriver

Firefox is by far the best browser for speed and usefulness, combined.

drdax2301
drdax2301

Yep very true. FF4 (been running beta 12) is a vast improvement. Lost a few of my fav themes but excellent browser. So many ad-ons too. SEO Quake my fav.

ricrac
ricrac

First thing, go back to school and learn the difference between "their" and "they're". Then, learn proper sentence construction and learn to proofread. Maybe then someone will take you seriously. I find it very difficult to lend any credence to someone who is obviously illiterate and definitely has a chip. Won't mention about his data being flawed. Too many morons with access.

seanferd
seanferd

These are not good tools, in general, for checking on internet stuff. Not sure what you think your traceroute means, but it kinda says nothing.

jhinkle
jhinkle

Wow, you really have a chip on your shoulder about your ISP. Seeing as how I've worked as a Network and Systems Admin for 2 ISP's I'll clue you in on a few things. 1) If you believe your ISP is that bad you have the right to switch, seeing as how you're equipment states your in Tampa I'd assume you have more than one option. 2) Saying most ISP's have misconfigured there equipment is wrong, if that was the case then most ISP's would have been shut down by now. Saturation in the provider market is strong almost everywhere nowadays so one bad ISP will always be eaten by a better one based on customer satisfaction, I've seen it happen several times now, it's the nature of the game. 3) The traceroute you sent actually shows good return times. The most likely explanation is that your ISP has decided to block ICMP traffic at it's core. This is generally done to stop certain types of virus traffic, DDOS attacks, and a variety of other small attacks. It's usally only done at the core because that's your primary ingress point and will be the best place to block icmp without causing issues with tools monitoring the network. 4) You may know how to do a traceroute but that doesn't mean you actually know anything about WAN's. Include the fact that you've turned a simple forum thread into a bitch session and I'd say the reason no one wants to deal with you is because you have no clue as to what's actually going on and you're most likely the problem. Maybe you should take some time to run bandwidth tests both on and off network. I would also recommend shutting down your bit torrent client, netflix, pandora, and any bandwidth hogging programs. 5) Not once during your bitch session did you bother to mention what type of internet access you have and what package you've purchased. How fast is it, and how much bandwidth are you using regulary? Finally, I'm not sure why I decided to respond to your rant, maybe it's years of listening to people like you pointing the finger. But the final call on this is if your ISP is that bad then switch, or maybe you don't want to because you're worried it is actually your problem and you just don't know what you're talking about.

JCitizen
JCitizen

ever hear of a typo? I always misspell their - there - and they're, because I fat finger the keyboard. Big deal! X-(

ess
ess

@ jhinkle ..........Having a bad hair day are you. Cable Internet and cable Digital TV pixilate's, even sometimes on the analog TV's. LAST month they screwed something up and it's all in the trash now. System here is fairly large and has been tested thoroughly. They have been out here 70+ times to do their dog and pony show. You know, as you worked for an ISP, they snip a wire, replace the good end, change an amp, change whatever can be changed out, and when all is said and done, still doesn't work. Why...because the problem isn't on site, it's their network system. It's the blind lead the blind, even the supervisors.!! I have the same problems on customers & friends systems that use this ISP. As far as us changing ISP's, not possible. The other ISP's are way worse.!! DSL & SAT aren't exactly premium options 2Mb down LOL. But some of our customers did go DSL. They were warned.!! On a bad day I get 5Mb down, good day 38Mb down. I pay for 40Mb. Poor RF signal will give poor results. Which is only one of the problems. Signal has been good of late, they tweeked something on their network and now thins aren't so good. Fact...some...very few...traces complete, so if they do have ICMP blocked then they don't have it blocked across the board. Which again says they don't have things config'ed properly if ICMP blocked is the case. Keep in mind, I do have some experience, I remote admin systems around the world. Europe has one of the better systems. Hops around Europe are single digit, hops from them to America are mostly triple digit. America sucks.!! 4G Cell phones, a joke!! 5) Not once during your bitch session did you bother to mention what type of internet access you have What you couldn't tell from the traceroute..!! Here I'll give you a clue....bhn!! Why did you work for two ISP's, they weren't good enough, or you weren't good enough..!! LOL Like I said, their Religiously RIGHT..!! IDIOTS..!!

stevec
stevec

... justify some typos, but not their, there and they're. Those keys are well-removed from each other. Not to mention "they're" has more characters than the others.

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