Microsoft

Run a list of rolling credits at the end of your PowerPoint presentation

Acknowledge important credentials using PowerPoint's credits effect at the end of your presentation.

After you have dazzled your audience, you might want to thank people for contributing to your presentation in some way. You can recognize them personally, which is a good idea, especially if they're present. You can also consider adding a list of credits to the end of your presentation. It's easy to do using PowerPoint's Credits effect.

The first step is to add a new slide that contains the names of the people you want to thank. You can use the default layout slide and a bulleted text box, to get started quickly. Add the title text and then simply add each person as a bulleted item, adding three or four empty lines between each entry, as shown below, to the text box. As you add items, the font will shrink a bit to accommodate the new lines, but don't worry about that. For now, just get all the names in the text box.

To format the slide, do the following:

  1. Select all of the text in the text box and remove the bullets by clicking the Bullets option in the Paragraph group on the Home tab (or the Formatting toolbar in PowerPoint 2003).
  2. Click the Center option in the same group to center the items between the left and right margins.
  3. Choose 32 from the Font Size dropdown in the Font group. Doing so will force text beyond the bottom margin of your slide, but that's Okay.
  4. Select white from the Font Color dropdown. The text will momentarily disappear. Change the title's font color as well. While doing so, you might want to change the title's alignment or font size, but we're not concerned with the slide's title in this example.
  5. Right-click the slide's background (not inside the text box) and choose Format Background (just Background in PowerPoint 2003). From the Color dropdown, choose black, and then click Close.

Now we're ready to add the Credits effects to the items in the text box, as follows:

  1. Press [Ctrl]+A to select the title and the text box that contains the names. (You want to select all the objects in the slide.)
  2. Click the Animations tab. In PowerPoint 2003, choose Custom Animation from the Slide Show menu.
  3. Click Add Animation dropdown in the Advanced Animation group. If Credits isn't in the Entrance section, select More Entrance Effects. In PowerPoint 2003, click the Add Effects dropdown at the top of the pane, choose Entrance, and then More Effects.
  4. In the resulting dialog, select Credits in the Exciting section, and click OK.
  5. Click Animation Pane in the Advanced Animation group. (The pane should be open already in PowerPoint 2003.)
  6. Select the first item, Title 1, and set this item's Start setting (in the Timing group) to After Previous.
  7. Select the second item and enter a Delay setting of 2 seconds. In PowerPoint 2003, right-click the effect, choose Timing, and set the Delay option in the resulting dialog.

After setting the Credits effect, you're ready to view the slide by pressing [F5]—and watch the title and names roll from the bottom of the screen to the top.

For your convenience, you can download a demo presentation.

About

Susan Sales Harkins is an IT consultant, specializing in desktop solutions. Previously, she was editor in chief for The Cobb Group, the world's largest publisher of technical journals.

19 comments
athineos59
athineos59

that all the volunteers in the spelling police need to find something more constructive to waste their time than being critical... Like they never made a mistake themselves... If they had caught it on time, it wouldn't be there, would it? What about the ones they (the critics themselves) did not catch? Thank you Susan for the information. While not the most important thing to know it is nonetheless something that will impress some people and it has its uses.

ssharkins
ssharkins

Let's take advantage of the situation. Have you ever found a typo in the middle of your live presentation? What did you do? If this hasn't happened to you yet, how do you think you'd handle the situation?

james.vandamme
james.vandamme

...that audiences enjoy animations, but it's not so. Fortunately, most of us went through that phase long ago, about the time of website animations. BTW tthis works on LibreOffice, too.

breault.jean-sebastien
breault.jean-sebastien

"About Susan Harkins Susan Sales Harkins is an IT consultant, specializing in desktop solutions. Previously, she was editor in chief for The Cobb Group, the world's largest publisher of technical journals." Wow, and she still uses Office 2003 on a windows 98 layout and misspelled her PowerPoint presentations. Anyway, it's not that important; I think that over animated PowerPoint presentations can lead to something non-professional.We all saw one day a presentation with ???vroom-vroom???, ???Zaaap??? and other sound and animations in PowerPoint. I remember, each time it was an old grandpa or a very young employee who doesn???t know how computer really work. I always thought it was non-professional.

Geoff_Hoare
Geoff_Hoare

Sorry, but I seem to spend my life looking out for typos in other peoples' presentations.

BALTHOR
BALTHOR

There is a piece of software out there that will allow you to lift the photos from a PDF file.

marybee27
marybee27

I'd like to THINK, but the rest of you may prefer it if I THANK...

ssharkins
ssharkins

You seem to be suggesting that we shouldn't use them at all -- wonder how the general readership feels about that. IMHO, I like limited use, but I wouldn't ban them.

ssharkins
ssharkins

I used PowerPoint 2010 on Windows XP. I wish this small typo wasn't such a distraction for some of you. I don't think I'll even correct it -- kind of makes an interesting side topic. Typos happen. :)

ssharkins
ssharkins

I always wonder this -- I work hard to avoid typos and mistakes, but... being human, I do make them. In this case, it hardly matters -- the point I'm trying to communicate is still made. It's not that I don't care or that I'm lazy or that I'm unprofessional -- I'm just a normal human being like everyone else, who occasionally... misses something. The fact that tr readership is seeing those mistakes doesn't really bother me because most are like me -- they see it, shrug their shoulders a bit, maybe chuckle, and go on.

alfred
alfred

Geof you are not alone. You will never run out of typos. I have just put a similar complaint on ZDNet.

james.vandamme
james.vandamme

The PDF import plug in in LibreOffice does that. Really, I don't know why anybody wastes money on Microsoft Word or Powerpoint.

dgfsadmf
dgfsadmf

Susan, I liked the suggestions in your article; I think it is gracious to thank the contributors to your presentation and if I was in the audience I would think more highly of the presenter for doing that. However, I find your indifferent attitude about publishing a professional article with errors surprising and appalling. Yes, I try not to let errors through, but they seem to get through with some regularity (mostly because I didn???t take the time to re-read my email or document one last time before I sent it). And I am mortified ??? at least briefly ??? when I discover my sloppiness. Your spelling error would have been forgivable if you had simply apologized to your readers for it, but this uncaring attitude towards your audience and peers seems to be at odds with what I took to be the tone of your article.

alfred
alfred

Susan I know all people make mistakes and typos. The point I made in my comment on ZDNet was that spell checkers and proof reading should eliminate most. The ones that will always get through without proof reading are those that are proper words but not the intended one as in your case think instead of thank.

rcstan
rcstan

...are the epitome of making a mountain out of a molehill, and shout ungratefulness for Susan's benevolence in sharing her knowledge with the masses.

ssharkins
ssharkins

I am sorry I missed that typo. A simple typo doesn't elicit those strong emotions in me, but I respect your opinion on the matter.

flotsam70
flotsam70

I like this tip on PowerPoint credits, think you! ;P Please ignore the grammar Nazis and keep writing. They obviously have too much time on there hands. They're nitpicking is probably symptomatic of serious constipation. I would edit a quote from Ratatouille as: "In many ways, the work of a critic is easy, the exception being defecation." By the way, you silly trolls, try plugging this into Word: We'd like to think the following people. In Word 2003, at least, the grammar check didn't catch this. Lest the trolls are daft and incapable of sardonic wit, erroneous grammar in this comment is intentional.

ssharkins
ssharkins

Editing your own work is hard. Our brains know what we meant and therefore, that's what our brains read. You're right, spell and grammar-checkers catch a lot (thank goodness!) and I rely on them. I have several pairs of words that cause me trouble: snake and snack, whip and wipe are just two of them. :) Even knowing this, I still miss them occasionally. I think this is the first time this has happened with think and thank!