Windows

How do I delete hiberfil.sys and reclaim the hard disk space?

The Hibernate feature in Microsoft Windows creates a hiberfil.sys file. Here is how you delete that file and reclaim the hard disk memory.
Editor's note: If you have ever used the Hibernate feature in Microsoft Windows, then you have created the hiberfil.sys file in the system root directory. If you use Hibernate all the time, this is how it is supposed to be, but if you do not use Hibernate, you can reclaim some hard disk memory space by deleting the file and turning off Hibernate. TechRepublic's Head Technology Editor, Bill Detwiler, is going to show us how.

This How do I blog post was adapted from a post in the TR Dojo Blog and is available in PDF format in a free TechRepublic download.

Hiberfil.sys and Windows Hibernate function

To understand why hiberfil.sys exists, we must look at the Windows Hibernate function. When you activate Hibernate, Windows takes a snapshot of your current session (all your running programs, open files, etc.) and writes that information to your hard drive. Hibernate was designed to speed up shutdowns and restarts and save power on laptops.

Figure A

Windows hiberfil.sys
Hiberfil.sys, as the name suggests, is the file to which Windows saves the snap-shot data. Thus, the file is always equal in size to the total amount of available RAM on the computer (Figure A). On a computer with plenty of free disk space, having such a large file just hanging around usually isn't a problem. But if you're running low on hard drive space and never use the Hibernate feature, hiberfil.sys is unnecessarily eating up valuable disk real estate.

Disabling Windows Hibernation

As I noted earlier, you can manually delete hiberfil.sys, but it will just come back. To permanently remove the file, you must disable the Windows Hibernate function. You can do this through either the Windows GUI or the command line.

Windows XP

On Windows XP systems, you can easily disable Hibernate through the GUI using the following steps:

  1. Open the Control Panel and access Power Options.
  2. Select the Hibernate tab in the Power Options Properties dialog box.
  3. Clear the Enable Hibernation check box (Figure B) and click OK.

Figure B

Windows XP - Power Options - Hibernate

If you would prefer to disable Hibernate through the command line, you can use the steps outlined below.

Windows Vista and Windows 7

Completely disabling Hibernate through the GUI on Windows Vista and Windows 7 is significantly more difficult than on Windows XP. The Hibernate settings are still stored under the Control Panel's Power Options applet, but they are buried under each power plan's advanced power settings submenu. In fact, I was unable to remove hiberfil.sys by altering the appropriate Power Options (Allow Hybrid Sleep and Hibernate After) on either Windows Vista or Windows 7 (Figure C).

Figure C

Windows 7 Power Options - Advanced Settings - Sleep and Hibernate

The only surefire method of disabling Hibernate, and thus removing hiberfil.sys, on Windows Vista and Windows 7, is through the command prompt and the following steps:

  1. Open a command prompt with administrative privileges.
  2. Enter "powercfg.exe -h off" (Figure D).
  3. Exit the command prompt.

Figure D

Windows powercfg.exe

As soon as you clear the check box or execute the above powercfg.exe command, Windows should delete hiberfil.sys. If not, you can manually delete it.

Re-enabling Windows Hibernate

To turn the Hibernate function back on, simply recheck the Enable Hibernation setting under Power Option Properties or enter "powercfg.exe -h on" at a command prompt with administrative privileges.

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About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

63 comments
pa79th
pa79th

Does not work. Gives an error message about running a batch command.

leo8888
leo8888

Just one more in my long and growing list: "Completely disabling Hibernate through the GUI on Windows Vista and Windows 7 is significantly more difficult than on Windows XP". So far every tweak or settings change I attempt on Win7 PC's requires much more work to achieve the same result I could easily accomplish on WinXP boxes. MS is slowly taking away more and more control from admins and power users in favor of pretty screens and useless "features". It is very frustrating to have to learn complicated new ways of doing things that should/could be easy. OK I'm done bitching for now. ;-)

DesertOutlaw
DesertOutlaw

Just create a new power profile and disable it.

abookcliff
abookcliff

I SUSPECT STRONGLY,BUT HAVE NOT PROVED IT, THAT,THE HIBERFILE CAN AND DOES BY VIRTUE OF THE WAY IT WORKS--SAVE FILES FROM BEFORE CHANGES ARE MADE(UPDATES ETC) AND RETAIN THEM, THUS LEADING TO POTENTIAL PROBLEMS WITH THE WAY A SYSTEM RUNS AFTER RESUME. IT MAY BE PRUDENT TO EMPTY THAT CACHE FROM TIME TO TIME(OR SET IT TO CREATE A COMPLETELY FRESH CACHE EACH TIME) JUST TO AVOID ANY ISSUES THAT COULD THUS BE CREATED . THAT COULD POSSIBLY RELIEVE SOME INCREASED MEMORY USEAGE ISSUES OVER TIME

ddhayes
ddhayes

tried doing powercfg.exe -h off and got message saying i don't have permission to enable/disable the hibernate feature. I am an admin on my PC. Thoughts?

jimkovacs
jimkovacs

I disable it on every machine i meet. Keep them AWAKE !!!

Vicious Circle
Vicious Circle

I use the Hybrid Sleep setting on my Win7 Desktop at home, and the way I understand that is that it puts the computer in sleep mode, but also writes the hiberfil.sys in case there is a power outage or other power problem. So, to my thinking if you use Sleep, make sure it isn't hybrid sleep before trying to delete this file as well.

PeterM42
PeterM42

Thanks for that tip. Interesting how an OS (the much hyped Vista 6.1 aka Windows 7) which is supposed to make life easier for users can actually, in some ways, be more difficult than XP.

redem20102010
redem20102010

Great and work fine for me on my Windows Vista.

MSajidH
MSajidH

Very Good Article... Thanks

thegreat1-4ever
thegreat1-4ever

I use standby all the time with my laptop..is that the same as hibernation??

catester
catester

What is "hard disk memory space"?

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

Do you use the Hibernate feature in Windows? Do you prefer it over the Sleep feature? Why?

Rhodent
Rhodent

They make simple things more complicated, and their new shiny interfaces offer less and less flexibility. I've had it for a month & a half, and I miss Vista still. Time to brace m'self and finally make the move to Linux.

vyper
vyper

Maybe but W7 is so much more stable in my opinion

awgiedawgie
awgiedawgie

I'll be done bitching when they're done screwing things up.

jim.aldinger
jim.aldinger

I have Windows 7 Ultimate and I got the same error when I tried to issue the powercfg.exe -h off command.

Technous285
Technous285

I too disable "Hibernation" (along with "Sleep" and "Standby") on all my machines, including my laptop. If I'm going to need to power down a system for some reason, might as well save everything, close it all and shut the whole thing down so I ~KNOW~ there's no power being used when it's not needed.

pjboyles
pjboyles

Using the command line to disable hibernation disableds hybred sleep.

michaels.perry
michaels.perry

Standby uses some power all the time! It will flatten batteries but not as quickly as it does when the PC is in full use without a charger/'brick'. It is not the same as OFF or Hibernate. In hibernate mode the PC is turned OFF after the file has been created. If you are running only on batteries, there will be no power used after the shutdown into hibernate. If you are using a mains-powered system, or a charger/'brick', then the low voltage side is turned off but there will be a small amount of mains power used to keep the charger/'brick' active. Unplugging is safe and will not harm your PC after it has entered hibernate and that will reduce power consumption to zero.

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

That might be an accurate description. I agree the wording is misleading, RAM=Memory, HDD=storage. On the other hand, it is an image of the present memory content, and it is in HDD storage. So ... idunno.

michaels.perry
michaels.perry

The article misleads in that the first screen grab shows the files stored on disk, and hyberfil.sys on the machine uses about 4 GB of hard disk space. It uses zero RAM. During use, the PC uses RAM as a means of storing data needed by the OS and programs and it highly dynamic, plus it is volatile so 'forgets' everything when the power is turned off. The HDD (Hard Disk Drive) is 'permanent' storage, is not dynamic (except the page file) and it is not volatile so it 'remembers' everything when the power is turned off. As the hyberfil.sys file is stored on HDD it is available as a 'snapshot' of the system when Hibernate was selected, hence it is easy and quick to restart. Many systems will not have 4 GB of RAM so the size of hiberfil.sys is partly dictated by the ammount of system RAM (volatile memory). Hibernate has its uses and uses little or no power as it turns off the power supplies. On a laptop it will use zero power, on a desktop it will turn off the low voltage side of the power supply leaving only the primary (mains) side running at a low consumption state unless the power socket/outlet is switched off/unplugged.

Zwort
Zwort

An interesting question. Speaking from my perspective in the neurosciences, when I power down at night (and it's already been shown that there is a loop between the prefrontal area and the basal ganglia that acts in a similar way to a swap file, when the task is too much for the available 'space'), where do I dump my OS for fast reactivation, and just how long does it take to reactivate BIOS-LOGOS first thing, assuming no neural pollution from alcohol, or other damaging substances? Is there a similarity to a GUI OS waking up on a button press? A memory of the OS itself, in working mode, dumped onto the HD. Hmm.

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

And it asks for a login on wake from sleep, but not on a wake from hibernate. I haven't immediately found a way to impose the same policy on both. Is this something that's true in general?

Celldweller1591
Celldweller1591

Just goto Windows main menu and lick a small button just on right side of Shotodwn button and you will see restart,sleep,hibernate etc. Click Hibernate and done. Hibernate.sys file takes about 1.5 gb space or so from your hard disk. Its better to use sleep mode if you are short of psace ;). you can try this also : -Right-click on a blank area in the Desktop -Click New and select Shortcut -In the Type the location of the item text box, type 'shutdown.exe /h' -In the Type a name for this shortcut, type Hibernate, and click Finish

Andrzej_Ladosz
Andrzej_Ladosz

Once I had that experience with Windows XP Pro on the laptop some time ago: I put laptop in Hibernation. It was on normal power, battery was fully charged and in relatively good condition (i.e. it does hold the charge for long time and is able to power laptop for quite long time without recharge). When I wanted to restart it - IT DID NOT WANT TO START!!! Many tries - NO LUCK. PC dead like a stone. On battery or mains - no difference. Nothing on the display, all LEDs off. Only green indicator that the battery is full and not charging. After changing underpants for clean ones I prepared to remove hard disk to connect it to desktop as external drive in hope to recover data - if it was still there. Just in case and last hope - I disconnected battery charger once more and REMOVED BATTERY. After few minutes (eternity then) I plugged battery back in and pressed "Power switch". Lights came on - Glory to God - and laptop started. Through tears I did not see if it was wake-up from Hibernation or standard, full boot. I think it was that latter. Since then - Hibernation on any laptop or desktop are and will be something I immediately switch off and keep checking if it stays as such. In my opinion: 2, 3 or even 10 minutes waiting for computer to boot up is much shorter than recovering from emotional stress, not to mention the data. If you believe my dramatization of the story - you can also include the time to do washing of soiled underwear... Imagine reaction of somebody (VIP maybe?) who got his first computer with Windows 7 and who has difficulty differentiating the ends of the screwdriver in such situation, maybe 10 minutes before important presentation thousands of km from his/her own office. My own first, bigger shock (in computing anyway) was "unexpected", but perfectly correct, result of using FDISK command under DOS 2-something?. I also built and upgraded more PCs than many people have seen. Not many things can surprise me in this business, but this one did - and BIG TIME!!! Andrzej

vaughanm
vaughanm

I use Hibernate so that the comp is as I left it when I left it and the power is off, and it has a fast start up.

Dave O
Dave O

Hibernate lets me boot up my laptop in 10-15 seconds. Otherwise, booting takes 3-4 minutes to get everything loaded. To me, that difference is an eternity. I never use sleep. It uses power.

Somewhiteguy
Somewhiteguy

On my laptop it's a necessary evil. If I'm traveling and need to close the laptop to get on the plane only to pick up where I left off it's a great feature. I like it over sleep because if I don't get to my laptop on the plane for whatever reason (space, sleep, etc.) it doesn't wear down my battery by being on in my bag. On all my desktop computers, I'd advise to turn it off. Sleep is a better option than hibernate, and just having a good screen-saver is better than sleeping on the desktop.

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

Mostly because my system takes forever to start up and shut down, but I don't like leaving the system powered, for fear of electrical mishaps in various forms.

Mark A. Lewis
Mark A. Lewis

It may be a re-post, but it is the first time I've read it. I'm going to use the tip.

lindsayt
lindsayt

Press Start. Type CMD. Hold down CTRL + Shift and press Enter Type powercfg.exe -h off This should work for you.

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

I have two machines, one with an english-language windowsXP, the other with a localized version. The englishlanguage version has sleep, but the other one has standby, so I thought it's a translation equivalent. But I could be wrong.

awgiedawgie
awgiedawgie

In a way the Hard Disk is a kind of RAM. You can access any part of the hard drive in mere milliseconds. Although the term RAM means Random Access Memory, and the means by which you access either the RAM or the HDD is anything but random. The Hard Disk grew out of a need to have large amounts of non-volatile memory that could be accessed directly. Tape drives allowed for the large amount of storage, but were not suited to easy access, and the tapes had a very short lifespan because of the constant winding and unwinding. Floppy disks and RAM allowed for the easy access, but floppy disks were fragile and had very little storage, and RAM is volatile, meaning it goes blank when the power is turned off. And until recently, RAM-drives (or Solid State Drives) that could hold hundreds of GB were not readily available to the public. And so the hard drive was born. Instant access to first millions, then billions, and now trillions of bytes of data was suddenly possible in a sealed compartment protecting it from dust and other contamination. My first hard drive was 10MB. Now I have individual documents that are bigger than that!

Mark A. Lewis
Mark A. Lewis

It does look ambiguous and the graphic also caught my attention. It would have been better to label the graphic 4 GB instead of 4 GB RAM to avoid the confusion. After reading the entire article, it was my understanding that the writer's system had 4 GB RAM and the size of the .sys file size matched. It looks like the graphic was an attempt to show the RAM-to-diskspace match, not that the file was actually RAM. I never use hibernate on my desktop and plan to use this tip to regain diskspace.

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

You have a digital brain? You should upgrade to the decentralized emergent system, that way your whole memory space is also your processor space which is also your hard-wired OS and personality emulator.

awgiedawgie
awgiedawgie

Good information for those who need to know how to engage hibernation, but not applicable here. The question addressed by the article was how to get rid of the file that hibernation creates, and to do that you have to disable hibernation.

awgiedawgie
awgiedawgie

Did you just say "lick a small button"?!? Sorry, I couldn't resist that one :D

awgiedawgie
awgiedawgie

I say that because I have had the exact same experience you had (minus the soiled undergarments), but I did not have hibernation active. Mine happened during a normal (or what should have been normal) shutdown-powerup cycle. But I agree with you on the CMOS. Removing the power cord/battery and holding the power button does not deprive the CMOS of any power. It does, however, deprive the motherboard in general (and thereby any residual settings) of power, since the CMOS battery is only for the CMOS. I have even once had to resort to dismembering my laptop, disconnecting the keyboard and the monitor, and initiating a powerup and then a forced shutdown (press and hold power button until it shuts down), and then reassembling everything. When I restart, I get the idiot menu that says "Windows did not successfully start, and do you want to have a cow, man?" If you are trying to restore from hybernation at this point, you will also be greeted with the options of re-trying the restore sequence, or deleting the restore data (hyberfil) and starting Windows normally. I like that my Compaq laptop has something called "hybrid sleep" mode, which uses almost no power (I can leave it in sleep for over 24 hours and still be able to powerup), but it doesn't take forever to go to sleep (like hybernation did), and literally takes only a few seconds to powerup. I have discovered that Windows takes a really long time to write and read a 4GB hyberfil, but with all my software, a powerup from a dead stop takes even longer. So for me, sleep mode is essential, and hybrid sleep is ideal.

IndianaTux
IndianaTux

That is something that happens to all PCs from time to time. You just have to reset the CMOS, which is done just as you described, but sometimes requires the additional step of holding the power button for 10 seconds with the battery/power source removed. I've seen it happen on everything from laptops to cell phones/blackberrys, and even handheld RF barcode readers, both old and new. I would also suspect outdated drivers to be a possible contributor to your experience. Having the most up-to-date BIOS can also remedy some hibernation issues. I use hibernate almost every day. I also suggest to my laptop users (we have all Lenovo laptops deployed) that they hibernate before taking their laptop off the dock to a meeting, and hibernating at the end of their meeting, then resuming windows after they put it back on the dock. The Lenovo hardware and the Intel graphics chips seem to handle this sequence much better than the quirky "Undock Computer" option found in Windows XP and Windows 7. The undocking option doesn't always restore multiple-screen configurations properly when re-docking the machine while powered on, and sometimes results in external keyboard or mouse being unresponsive until a reboot. Using hibernate, the settings are restored properly 95-99% of the time.

scubajeff2
scubajeff2

Thats why Im up at 4am typing this... my HP HDX 20 takes right at 3 minutes, so I use hibernate on it as well- with win7 maybe 5 seconds and Im ready to log in.

awgiedawgie
awgiedawgie

If you don't have a surge protector that includes protection for incoming lines other than just power (telephone, ethernet, coax, etc.), get one. If you disconnect your computer from everything when you power down or hybernate, peachy. But what about when you are using it? If you are using it at the time of an "electrical mishap," you are just as much at risk as the computer itself. As long as your computer is connected to any of these lines, it is at risk for "electrical mishaps." We had a computer at work that had its modem and NIC fried during an electrical storm, even though the power cord was protected. Fortunately, no one was using it. It doesn't do much good to protect the power supply, only to leave the rest of the machine vulnerable. And to protect yourself even further, install a UPS/Line Conditioner. Even in locations that have their own back-up generators for power outages, that millisecond between the power going out and the generator kicking in will be enough to make you very unhappy. The UPS will maintain a constant voltage going into your equipment. Power dips, brown-outs, etc. may not be enough to shut your machine off, but repeated power fall-offs will affect your hard drives, for one. A UPS will also give you time to shut down everything safely if the power does go out.

Realvdude
Realvdude

Even powered off, any computer with a soft power switch (not a switch on the primary power line) the power supply and motherboard are still powered on at a low level. You may spare the hard drive and perhaps an addon card, like a graphics card, but everything else is still at risk. I also hibernate because of the startup time and usually only shut down when I won't be using it for a few days. My work computer has a program scheduled to open at the beginning of the work day, which brings the computer out of hibernation even before I get to it.

awgiedawgie
awgiedawgie

If you are clicking a shortcut to the command prompt - on the Desktop, Start Menu, etc. - you can right-click the shortcut and choose 'Run as Administrator.' It has the same effect as pressing Ctrl-Shift-Enter from the Start Menu's Search box. In both cases, assuming you still have User Account Control active, you will be required to confirm using the Administrator Mode.

awgiedawgie
awgiedawgie

Standby/Sleep is simply a mode in which the computer uses only the power absolutely necessary to keep the RAM alive and to power the input devices that can be used to awaken it - typically the keyboard, in some cases the mouse, and on laptops, opening the lid. Hybernation does in fact, as has been mentioned, shut the computer off completely, after making an exact copy of the contents of the RAM, and storing that copy in the hyberfil.sys file, and setting a flag in the startup routine that tells Windows to restore the RAM to that previous state, rather than starting Windows normally.

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

That first machine I used had an 8" Floppy, not a 5 1/4", those came way later. LP-sized almost, extraordinary.

awgiedawgie
awgiedawgie

... how they can fit a million times the amount of data in a fraction of the space. My first computer was an IBM PC. Not an AT or an XT - just a PC. Dual 5-1/4 floppies, one parallel port, one serial port (that was extra - to connect the digitizer tablet), and a DIN-5 port to connect a cassette player as a storage device. Never did use that feature. Already had had too much experience with the cassette not returning the same data you put into it. Also had an external 8 inch floppy drive. I don't recall how much it all cost (memory gets a little fuzzy going back that far). (OK, technically, my first computer was a little Trash-80 almost-a-computer that you hooked to the TV - about the size of a portable DVD player, and with fewer functions than my pocket calculator) The hard drive came a few years later. That monstrosity took up the space of two modern CD/DVD drives (but then each 5-1/4 floppy drive took up that much, too). I'm guessing from your post that it was considerably smaller than the one you had. Also had (and still have) an HP plotter the size of New York, for printing out blueprints. That was around 6,000 dollars itself. Ahh, such fond memories - makes me feel all warm and fuzzy... and old :)

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

My dad bought a 1MB used peripheral HDD for the then equivalent of 6000 USD. That alone was bigger than the six years old desktop computer I have now. But before that it worked perfectly well using 5 1/4" Floppies.

awgiedawgie
awgiedawgie

... far more (and far too many) cases of people being prescribed medication for psychiatric 'problems' for the rest of their lives. I believe - perhaps wrongly - that the vast majority of those are unable to stop their medication because it is treating a symptom, rather than solving a problem. Of course, the medical community at large has no real incentive to solve problems, because that would mean fewer office visits, and so would mean 'no Porsche for Christmas this year.' There was, however, a specific case I was thinking of in which a friend of mine was prescribed medication as a child to stimulate her brain's production of a hormone (for lack of a better term) that was out of balance. After several years, she was able to taper off the meds completely. Her body had begun producing the hormone consistently on its own. In fact, in her case, staying on the medication would have created an imbalance in the other direction, because she would have then had too much of the hormone. Hers was one of the rare cases that saw the doctors finding and treating the root cause, instead of only the symptoms.

Rhodent
Rhodent

Modern mental health treats EVERYTHING as chemical imbalance - it promotes their agenda. Unfortunately, it is like shooting the messenger instead of fixing the problem. Of course, emotional imbalance will be represented chemically in the brain, but it is not the cause. It doesn't even make sense, since instead of explaining why a person is ill they just write it off to some mysterious "imbalance", put the genetic buzz on it (equally cryptic & popular) and go on selling their "cure". And, BTW - in most cases a time-limited course of medical treatment is not adequate. For almost all conditions, you will need to be taking meds all your life.

awgiedawgie
awgiedawgie

Well played. I stand corrected. As with much in life, the line between the two is not hard and fast. I have vivid memories from when I was two, and I've talked with other people who have no memory of anything before they turned five. I believe much of that has to do with how much a child's mind is stimulated from birth. My parents would read to me and my three siblings literally from the day we were born. My brother is a perfect example of your referencing children who can read by the age of two. All four of us were reading before we turned four, but he was reading adult-level books like Poe and Tolstoy by three, and he could explain what he was reading. Reading to children is an excellent way to get their minds going. It stimulates not only the visual and auditory, but also their imaginations. It makes them think, unlike television - the universal babysitter - which can reduce a person's mind to pudding if left unchecked. As for the hysteria, I don't doubt that some cases have been caused by repressed traumatic memories, even from the womb. Others truly are a result of a chemical imbalance, and have been successfully treated with medication that corrects the body's production of hormones and other chemicals. Once that has been stabilized, the medication can quite often be eliminated.

Rhodent
Rhodent

Dr. Janov claimed that individual cells could store memory of trauma. I'm sure the higher the organism, the more sophisticated are it's memory storage mechanisms.

Rhodent
Rhodent

I think if we want to discuss human cognition and memory we're gonna have to put the computer analogies aside. So, why not go off topic for a couple of posts. First, I don't have enough knowledge to enter the discussion about brain parts and how they function. But I am pretty sure the line between "lower learning" and "higher learning" isn't so sharp and definite, as you (and a large portion of the contemporary scientific community, I know) maintain. Learning comes from experience. Instincts are genetic, inbuilt, but we learn not only by calibrating our motor controls and various other biological or mechanic functions, but also by storing experience for future reference and analysis. Mental disorders were referred, at least in part, by the ancient Greeks as "Hysteria", something that originated in the womb. They are not biological defects, but rather remembered trauma, acting from the subconscious. A child of 2, it it gets burned by a hot oven, will learn to avoid it in the future. There's more: what about those 2 year-old's who can learn how to read? Exceptionally intelligent children, to be sure, but still. And what about people re-experiencing, in regressive therapy (Primal Therapy, for example), things such as their birth and even sensations they had while still in the womb?

awgiedawgie
awgiedawgie

There is a vast difference between learning memory and memories of events. A child begins learning even before birth, like kicking his mother whenever he hears his father's voice. But until his memory center has developed, he cannot consciously recall memories, and so, when he does begin to recall them, he cannot recall what happened before that. Learning memory is something akin to BIOS or ROM, where the fundamentals of basic operating are stored, such as walking and chewing gum at the same time, eating, not wetting the bed, etc. Children, until the hippocampus has developed sufficiently, have no concept of what they are learning or why, just as the BIOS has no idea what is being programmed into it. Memories of events, distinguishing right from left, which fork to use for the salad, washing your hands after you blow your nose, etc. are all society-specific, and must be learned in a more cognitive, conscious, and coherent fashion, like RAM or your hard drive. Similar to a CPU telling the difference between how Windows works and how a Mac works. Both could conceivably function in the same box, like being bilingual. Of course, the ability to remember which is which has to be stored in a semi-permanent manner, like installing the OS to the hard drive. But to recall where you left off requires RAM, which is emptied when you shut off the power, so to simulate it we use that almost conscious part of the memory that is hyberfil.sys.

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

There's no CPU, no OS, no RAM... Those are all functions of digital computers. The human brain is beyond a neural net which is but an emulation of the real thing. The neural net may use digital signalling because it is in fact not a neurological organ, rather an electronic device. The neuron doesn't have just two states, in fact, most of its "information" storage has to do with the strength of it's connections, and that's wholly analog stuff, and then, the neuron isn't all there is to the brains function, there's loads of supporting cells that make the picture even more complex. And no, children learn all the time. "Data" is stored even prenatally, there's just no need to reorganize data for the first many years because the amount of storage is humongous. And storage and memory and programming and hardware are largely indistinguishable from each other, the network grows into a physical shape that also engenders "softish" properties.

Rhodent
Rhodent

"FWIW memories in human children do not begin to form until around 3 years old, when the hippocampus has matured sufficiently" I am not sure of that at all. If you have no means of remembering, how can you learn? I'll start buying all those tidbits of wisdom modern psychiatry is trying to sell the public when they demonstrate they can be effective at things other than pill-pushing.

Zwort
Zwort

Heh. How else do you suppose a brain works? Do you have any idea of what is involved in, e.g., a GABA cascade? FWIW memories in human children do not begin to form until around 3 years old, when the hippocampus has matured sufficiently. Am I to conclude from that your words that children have no personality? But you are right; anthropomorphism is not just something we extend to fellow apes, but to ourselves also. Much of what passes for cognition of events takes place after reactions have occurred. So perhaps it was once rightly said that we should not refer to ourselves as "I" but "it".

Zwort
Zwort

Also BBFN to passwords and BIOS setup if you remove the CMOS battery, which I had to do to a machine that locked up in the frigging BIOS of all things (even the display was distorted) a few days back, even after disconnection and pressing the power button to discharge the residue charge. The problem? A lot of oxide on between the chip and cooling tower. Oops. The machine had no dust in because they are all cleaned regularly.

Andrzej_Ladosz
Andrzej_Ladosz

... on desktops. I believe that it does not rely on power supplied by PS or battery; it can survive months or years without losing BIOS settings. To reset it I short relevant jumpers - not removing power. Resetting CMOS would change some of its settings - which it did not. Whatever happened was linked to hibernation and that gave me a fright I like to avoid. Time saved - minutes the most - is not worth it.

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

I thought the sleep function keeps the RAM up-and-running, with following power drain. At least, this laptop doesn't seem to drain battery while hibernating, and that's neat.

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